Zeldas adventure

Zelda's Adventure

The game was critically panned by critics and even fans of the Zelda franchise for its graphics and terrible controls.

Wired magazine said that the graphics were some of the worst they had ever encountered. Scott Sharkey of 1UP.com called the box art of Zelda's Adventure one of the fifteen worst ever made.

Despite giving positive reviews for The Faces of Evil and The Wand of Gamelon, neither Danny Cowan of 1UP.com nor RetroGamer's John Szczepaniak would extend them to Zelda's Adventure, which Szczepaniak described as "demonstrating arbitrary and illogical design, sloppy visuals, nearly non-existent music, excruciatingly high difficulty, and cumbersome loading and controlling."

The gameplay for Zelda's Adventure has also been portrayed as a trial-and-error effort to guess which items can be used to defeat which enemy. Cowan called Zelda's Adventure "practically unplayable" due to the jerky frame rate, unresponsive controls, and long load times, summarizing his review with a warning to "avoid this game at all costs." In discussing the popular online conception that Zelda's Adventure is superior to The Wand of Gamelon and The Faces of Evil, RetroGamer pointed to the top-down perspective as fomenting misinformation regarding the game's similarities to the original Zelda when, according to RetroGamer, the game is actually not worth playing.

Sours: https://crappygames.miraheze.org/wiki/Zelda%27s_Adventure

Zelda's Adventure

This article describes a subject that is or may be outside the core Zelda canon.
This article is a stub. You can help the Zelda Dungeon Wiki by expanding it.

Zelda's Adventure

Zeldas-Adventure-Box.png

Zelda's Adventure is a game that was made by Philips Media and released for the Philips CD-i. After Philips and Nintendo parted ways, Philips was left with a four-game contract which included one Mario game (Hotel Mario) and three The Legend of Zelda titles. Zelda's Adventure was the final title released as part of its contract, with the previous two being Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon and Link: The Faces of Evil. Zelda's Adventure is not considered canon in the The Legend of Zelda series.

The game utilizes sprites and other graphics elements taken from real-world photographs and video. Every screen of the game was produced via dioramas, which were then photographed from the top. Not much else is known about this game, since physical copies of the game, as well as the CD-i itself, sell for hundreds of dollars today, limiting attempts to gain more information.

Some have criticized the game for its long load times and low-quality graphics[citation needed], while a few have praised it for being the only CD-i Zelda game with the traditional Zelda formula of top-down graphics, an expansive scrolling overworld, and several dungeons, each with its own item and boss, within the overworld.[citation needed]

Map

Overworld Map of Zelda's Adventure

Video


Speedrun in 1:37:11 by MC Gamer

Sours: https://www.zeldadungeon.net/wiki/Zelda%27s_Adventure
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Zelda's Adventure is a video game developed by Viridis and released for the Philips CD-i in 1995. It is the third The Legend of Zelda series game released for the console, following the release of Link: The Faces of Evil and Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon a year prior, which were developed separately by Animation Magic. Zelda's Adventure boasts an entirely unique design in comparison to the previous CD-i Zelda titles, emphasizing the difference in production between Viridis and the developer of its predecessors.

A product of a compromise between Nintendo and Philips due to their failure to release a CD-ROM based add-on to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System,[2]Zelda's Adventure, alongside the other two, are the only licensed The Legend of Zelda games developed for and released on a non-Nintendo system. The games have been subject to much criticism, and Nintendo does not recognize them as canon to The Legend of Zelda series.[3]

Story

The lands of Hyrule and Tolemac, a region in southeastern Hyrule,[4] are in the middle of an Age of Darkness; Ganon (referred to in-game as "Gannon") had captured Link and began exerting his influence over the land.[5] He had stolen the seven Celestial Signs and hidden them away in Tolemac's Shrines, guarded by his followers, the Shrine Keepers.[6] In need of a brave warrior to save the kingdom, the astronomer Gaspra summons Princess Zelda as his champion to undertake the dangerous task of relocating the Celestial Signs, to rescue Link, and to ultimately defeat Ganon and return peace to Tolemac.[7] He gives her a magic pendant and bids her good luck.

Along the way, Zelda is guided by Gaspra and Shurmak,[8] who both give her advice on solving Tolemac's puzzles and navigating the land. Zelda journeys through Tolemac as she confronts the Shrine Keepers and takes back the Celestial Signs, while meeting many other helpful and tricky characters along the way. She eventually finds the final Celestial Sign, but she is stopped by Ganon and is sent falling down an opening at the Vision Henge.[9] Zelda again faces the Shrine Keepers in a string of rematches before finally facing Ganon himself. She defeats him, and he disappears in a twister as his realm shatters. With Ganon's defeat, Link is rescued and peace is restored to Hyrule and Tolemac as the kingdom enters an "Age of Lightness".[10][11]

Gameplay

Princess Zelda serves as the game's protagonist, making Zelda's Adventure the second game in the series where the eponymous princess is playable. Unlike the previous two CD-i Zelda games, which are platforming side-scrollers similar to The Adventure of Link, Zelda's Adventure incorporates a similar top-down view reminiscent of most conventional 2D Zelda games. The land of Tolemac and its Shrines are divided into individual screens, in a very similar vein to the overworld and dungeons in The Legend of Zelda. Instead of a Sword, Zelda uses a Wand to combat enemies with. This Wand can acquire a plethora of Spells for added offense, some of which are required to defeat certain enemies and bosses. Casting these Spells costs a certain number of Rupees per use, similarly to the items in the previous CD-i Zelda games.

Zelda's Adventure also differs from the other two games in that it has dungeons, which are notably absent from The Faces of Evil and The Wand of Gamelon. Zelda must locate the Shrines where the Celestial Signs are guarded, which are to be completed in a specific order. The entrances to the dungeons will be barricaded otherwise should Zelda try to visit them out of order. Maps and Compasses can also be found in these Shrines to navigate them, akin to the dungeons in canon Zelda games.

As with the other two games, full motion video cutscenes are used to provide story. These cutscenes are used much less extensively than in the previous games, and are filmed live-action as opposed to animation. Character interaction is mainly achieved through the use of voice acting, as many characters will verbally speak to Zelda when approached on the overworld.

Development

Zelda's Adventure, along with the previous titles The Faces of Evil and The Wand of Gamelon, were the result of a compromise between Nintendo and Philips. After an attempt to produce a CD-ROM based add-on for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System with Philips failed, Nintendo reached a compromise and gave Philips the license to five of their franchises' characters for use for the Philips CD-i.[12]Zelda's Adventure was developed separately from the other two titles by Viridis Corporation.

As Viridis was given very little budget to work with, the development team had to get creative. Unlike the previous Zelda CD-i games, the idea was to build a game using top-down aesthetics similar to The Legend of Zelda with realistic-looking graphics. However this goal faced numerous difficulties and challenges with the team's limited budget as well as the CD-i's memory limitations.[13] One issue was the top-down motion capture necessary for all of the human characters, as Viridis could not afford to rent a studio. The team instead resorted to hanging a mirror on the office ceiling and have a camera on the floor point up to it to record the actors.[13] The human characters were all played by the in-office staff.[14] The walking animations were achieved by having the actors walk on a motorized treadmill. For the FMVs, one of the walls in the office was painted a bright blue to achieve the use of blue screen.[13] The indoor backgrounds and enemy sprites were created from clay models and props made by Jason Bakutis, which were then filmed on blue screen.[15] The background seen in Gaspra's FMVs were one of the clay props used.[16]

The overworld background terrains were taken from a combination of photo shoots of the Los Angeles area, photos of Hawaii taken by helicopter prior to the start of the project, as well as holiday vacation photos taken from other members of staff. A few of the artists were also sent with cameras to take macro photos of various textures for the in-game scenery.[16] The game's music was composed by in-house composer Mark Andrade, who also played Gaspra in the live-action FMVs. The character was instead voiced by Hal Smith. Zelda in the opening cutscene was played by office receptionist Diane Burns.[14]

Due to the console's limited memory and other hardware issues, the development team faced many frustrating difficulties with putting the game together. The highly-detailed backgrounds and sprites had to be reduced in size and color,[15] and at one point, the game's music and sound effects had also took up extra kilobytes of RAM.[16] These issues became a contributing factor as to why the game loads slowly when moving between screens.[16]

The game took two years of testing at Philips, longer than it took to develop, before finally being released.[16] Philips had stopped publishing CD-i games in North America by the time Zelda's Adventure was finished, and as a result the game was exclusively released in Europe.[1]

Trivia

Listings

Characters

Bosses

Enemies

Places

Dungeons

Items

Spells

Credits

External links

References

  1. 1.01.1The final CD-i releases by Philips Interactive Media of America were Flashback and Chaos Control, Interactive Dreams, published July 26, 2019, retrieved October 27, 2019.
  2. ↑Nintendo-Philips Deal Is a Slap at Sony - NYTimes.com
  3. ↑Eiji Aonuma Addresses Those Horrible 'Zelda' CD-i Games | MTV Multiplayer
  4. ↑"Zelda must set out on her journey deep into the uncharted southeastern region of Hyrule, known as Tolemac." (Zelda's Adventure manual, pg. 2)
  5. ↑"It is the Age of Darkness. The evil Gannon has captured the young hero Link." (Zelda's Adventure manual, pg. 2)
  6. ↑"Ah, the scroll of Shurmak, bearer of sad news these many years ago. And so it was that Gannon, Lord of Darkness, had taken over Tolemac. He has stolen the treasured celestial signs and captured Link! A brave warrior will have to be found to face this evil monster." — Gaspra (Zelda's Adventure)
  7. ↑"And so I found this champion of strength and courage, it is you, Princess Zelda. With this magic pendant go forth, and with each Sign you gather so too will you gain knowledge. Find your magic Wand, use it wisely and listen to your allies along the way. Go now my princess, restore the Celestial Signs and rescue Link!" — Gaspra (Zelda's Adventure)
  8. ↑"I am Shurmak your guide. I have known you since you were a child. You were given a difficult challenge. You will have to go far and overcome great danger. Stay calm and use your knowledge and strength to defeat your enemies. Remember what you learn along the way and persevere." — Shurmak (Zelda's Adventure)
  9. ↑"Zelda, life is always one order more horrifying than you expect. The great evil Ganon spoiled your victory. Make haste! Do not let him out of your sight." — Gaspra (Zelda's Adventure)
  10. ↑"Once she succeeds, she gains the knowledge and strength to rescue Link and brings the magical land of Hyrule into the Age of Lightness." (Zelda's Adventure manual, pg. 2)
  11. ↑"Princess Zelda, you've succeeded. Your victory has brought peace and light back to Tolemac." — Gaspra (Zelda's Adventure)
  12. "In a tribute to Nintendo's drawing power, Philips N.V. of the Netherlands has reached an agreement for Nintendo to provide its games for Philips's new interactive compact disk player, which lets users manipulate characters on a television screen. The arrangement is expected to give the Philips machine an edge over competing products." — Eben Shapiro, Nintendo Goal: Bigger-Game Hunters, NYTimes.com, published June 1, 1991, retrieved September 15, 2015.
  13. 13.013.113.2Interactive Dreams: Philips + Viridis = Zelda
  14. 14.014.1"Then Viridis was contracted to make Zelda’s Adventure for Phillips CD-i. We all wore many different hats when working on this game. They would use everyone in the office as characters in the game. The receptionist Diane Burns ended up being Zelda in the cut scenes and I ended up being casted as Gaspra." — Mark Andrade, Zelda's Adventure - My First Video Game Development Job, Sputnik Games (Archive), published September 3, 2014, retrieved March 19, 2018.
  15. 15.015.1Interview with Zelda's Adventure {Philips CD-i) Model and Prosthetic Maker Jason Bakutis - Nintendo Player
  16. 16.016.116.216.316.4Interactive Dreams: Zelda, Voyeur, and a man who worked on both CD-i projects...
Sours: https://zelda.fandom.com/wiki/Zelda%27s_Adventure

Zelda's Adventure  (CDi)

Release Date: 12/30/1995

Format:NTSC-U/C

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i)

As the brave warrior, Princess Zelda, it's your mission to thwart the enemy, Gannon, who has captured Link and taken over Tolemac. On the way to freeing Link, you'll journey deep into the Seven Shrines of the Underworld. You will acquire powerful weapons as you fight evil characters in your attempt to restore the Age of Lightness to this magical land.

Sours: https://www.estarland.com/product-description/cdi/Zeldas-Adventure/53366

Adventure zeldas

Zelda's Adventure

1995 video game

Zelda's Adventure is an action-adventurefantasyvideo game developed by Viridis Corporation and released for the Philips CD-i console system based on The Legend of Zelda franchise. Set in the land of Tolemac ("Camelot" spelled backwards), the game follows a non-traditional storyline, in which Link has been captured by the evil lord Ganon, and Zelda must collect the seven celestial signs in order to rescue him.

Released nearly 8 months after the first two Zelda CD-i games, Zelda's Adventure uses a different game engine from Faces of Evil and Wand of Gamelon. Whereas the first two CD-i games were patterned on the side-scrolling Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, Zelda's Adventure took the top-down The Legend of Zelda, A Link to the Past, and Link's Awakening as its models. Zelda's Adventure is the only Legend of Zelda game to feature live-action cutscenes. Reception for the game was negative, and whereas some critics have given more nuanced reviews of the first two games, modern criticism for Zelda's Adventure is one of the worst video games.

Gameplay[edit]

Unlike the previous two CD-i Zelda games, which take the side-scrolling view from Zelda II, Zelda's Adventure is played with the overhead view found in The Legend of Zelda.[2] Playing as Princess Zelda, the aim is to fight through the Seven Shrines of the Underworld to collect the celestial signs, and bring the land of Tolemac to an Age of Lightness.[2][3]

Unlike the other two games, Zelda's Adventure was created by Viridis, an entirely different company, with a change in style and gameplay.[2][3] Level design is very much like the original The Legend of Zelda and The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, with an overworld that allows access to individual dungeons.[3][4] The FMV sequences that present the plot are live action instead of animated.[4]

Plot[edit]

Ganon has kidnapped Link and stolen the seven celestial signs, creating an "Age of Darkness" in the kingdom of Tolemac.[5]Princess Zelda (Diane Burns) is recruited by the court astrologer Gaspra (Mark Andrade) to collect the signs to defeat Ganon and save Link.[6]

Guided by the words of Shurmak, Zelda must first travel through the forest to the Shrine of Rock,[7] where she encounters Llort, a greedy minion of Ganon who protects the first celestial sign.[8] Gaspra appears to congratulate Zelda and direct her to the Shrine of Illusion where she faces Pasquinade to earn the second celestial sign.[9][10] Guided by the inhabitants of Tolemac, Zelda then makes her way to the mountains to conquer the Shrines of Air[11] and Destiny[12] before crossing the great south sea to challenge Agwanda at the Shrine of Water for the fifth sign.[13][14] Gaspra directs Zelda once more to the Shrine of Power in the southeast where her strength is tested,[15] before travelling to the Shrine of Fire where she will face Warbane.[16][17] As Zelda reaches to collect the final celestial sign Ganon's claw stops her, and she is drawn into his lair for the final battle.

In the game's final scenes, peace returns to Tolemac. Link is revealed to be safe, holding hands with Zelda where the entrance to Ganon's lair once stood, the land now thriving with new growth.[18]

Development[edit]

In 1989, Nintendo signed a deal with Sony to begin development of a CD-ROM-based system known as the "Nintendo PlayStation" or the SNES CD to be an add-on to the Super Nintendo Entertainment System that would allow for FMV and larger games.[19][20] However, Nintendo broke the agreement and instead signed with Philips to make the add-on, which caused Sony to spin off their add-on into its own console called the PlayStation.[19][21][22] Witnessing the poor reception of the Sega Mega-CD, Nintendo scrapped the idea of making an add-on entirely.[19][20] As part of dissolving the agreement with Philips, Nintendo gave them the license to use five of their characters, including Link, Princess Zelda, and Ganon, for games on Philips's console called the CD-i, after the partnership's dissolution.[20][23] Contracting out to independent studios, Philips subsequently used the characters to create three games for the CD-i, with Nintendo taking no part in their development except to give input on the look of the characters[20][24] based on the artwork from Nintendo's original two titles and that of their respective instruction booklets.[25] Philips insisted that the development studios utilize all aspects of the CD-i's capabilities including FMV,[26] high-resolution graphics, and CD-quality music.[25] Because the system had not been designed as a dedicated video game console, there were several technical limitations, such as laggy controls (especially for the standard infrared controller),[26] and numerous problems in streaming-audio, memory, disc access, and graphics.[25] Viridis was tasked with observing A Link to the Past and basing Zelda's Adventure's gameplay on it, though was told to still show off the CD-i's capabilities, meaning that the game still used Redbook audio and animated cutscenes.[27]

The backgrounds for Zelda's Adventure were created from videos of scenery near Santa Monica Boulevard in West L.A., footage of Hawaii taken from a helicopter, and the developers' vacation photos.[28] This decision was responsible for much of the game's RAM usage, causing backgrounds to scroll slowly and causing extreme frustration to the game's developers. The CD-i's technical abilities were so limited that the use of one or two kilobytes of system RAM caused arguments amongst the developers.[28] Photos of the characters were shot using mirrors mounted on the ceiling, which was so low it precluded mounting the camera. All of the game's human characters were played by the in-office staff. The characters sprite walking animations were done by having the actors walk on a motorized treadmill.[29] The game's music composer Mark Andrade also played the part of Gaspra in the game's cutscenes, while his voice was provided by Hal Smith. Zelda in the game's cutscene was played by office receptionist Diane Burns, while her sprite was played by Annie Ward.[28] The houses and interiors built for the cut scenes were built as scale models.[28] The model artist was Jason Bakutis, who had worked in Hollywood on movies like Critters 3 and Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare.[30] Developers have stated they were not influenced by the first two CD-i Zelda games.[28]Zelda's Adventure spent two years in testing, longer than it took to develop the game.[28] Much more music was composed for the game than was used.[28] Developers had difficulty making sure all the areas of the game had proper background masking.[28] There were plans at one point to hire Echo & the Bunnymen to do the music.[30]

Intending to push the capacities of the CD-i to its limits, development initially progressed with a goal of 600 screens and 160 NPCs. At this early stage, Viridis president Lee Barnes suggested that playthrough time might take as much as 300 hours.[31] These development figures were reduced in the final product which had only a handful of NPCs and whose playthrough time has been placed by one commentator at only 12 hours.[32]

The majority of the game's programming was done by one person - Randy Casey. Randy was responsible for programming all of the game and all associated tools. Additional programming for the inventory system and game progress tracking, dubbed "FRP engine" was done by Gavin James. There is conflicting information about the game's budget—one developer claims there was "no budget at all"[29] while Bakutis claims (possibly facetiously) it had "at the time, the biggest budget ever for a video game".[30]

Reception[edit]

Zelda's Adventure was widely panned by critics. The graphics of Zelda's Adventure were called "blurry and digitized".[21][33]Wired magazine said that the graphics were some of the worst ever encountered.[21] The game's acting was criticized as unprofessional. Another flaw that has been identified is that the game could not produce both sound effects and music at the same time.[33] Scott Sharkey of 1UP.com called the box art of Zelda's Adventure one of the 15 worst ever made.[34]Zelda's Adventure was released as the Philips CD-i was being discontinued and has become very rare over time, as have the first two Philips Zelda games; Zelda's Adventure is regularly sold for over $100.[33][35]

Despite giving positive reviews for Faces of Evil and Wand of Gamelon, neither Danny Cowan of 1UP.com nor RetroGamer's John Szczepaniak would extend them to Zelda's Adventure, which Szczepaniak described as demonstrating arbitrary and illogical design, sloppy visuals, nearly non-existent music, excruciatingly high difficulty and cumbersome loading and controlling. Gameplay for Zelda's Adventure has also been portrayed as a trial-and-error effort to guess which items can be used to defeat which enemy.[36] Cowan called Zelda's Adventure "practically unplayable" due to the jerky frame rate, unresponsive controls and long load times, summarizing his review with a warning to "avoid this game at all costs."[33] In discussing the popular online conception that Zelda's Adventure is superior to Wand of Gamelon and Faces of Evil, RetroGamer pointed to the top-down perspective as fomenting misinformation regarding the game's similarities to the original Zelda when, according to RetroGamer, the game is actually not worth playing.[36]USgamer staff ranked Zelda's Adventure as the second worst The Legend of Zelda game, noting that it is counted separately from the other CD-i games due to being less terrible than the others. They considered it a "well-meaning attempt" to recreate the original The Legend of Zelda on the NES, as well as crediting it for being one of few video games to let players play as Zelda, but felt that the lack of experience on the designers' part as well as the CD-i's technical limitations made it a "dreadful" game to play.[37]IGN writer Peer Schneider was excited that a new developer was chosen instead of the one behind Wand of Gamelon and Faces of Evil, though still felt it was not worth playing despite being an improvement over the other two games. He recommended it only for "die-hard Zelda fan[s]."[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^Zelda's Adventure - CD-i - IGN → "Release Date: 1994" & ESRB rating E (USA)
    Zelda's Adventure (1995) CD-i release dates - MobyGames → 1995 in EUR
    Zelda's Adventure Release Information for CD-I - GameFAQs → 1995 in USA&EUR
  2. ^ abc"IGN: Zelda's Adventure". IGN. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  3. ^ abc"Zelda's Adventure for CD-i". MobyGames. Retrieved 2008-04-15.
  4. ^ abZelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). "Overview: Zelda's Adventure". Zelda Elements. Archived from the original on 2008-03-06. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  5. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Opening sequence.
  6. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Opening sequence.
  7. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media.
  8. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Inside the Shrine of Rock.
  9. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Sequence after the Shrine of Rock.
  10. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Entrance to the Shrine of Illusion.
  11. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media.
  12. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Sequence after the Shrine of Air.
  13. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Sequence after the Shrine of Destiny.
  14. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Entrance to the Shrine of Water.
  15. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Sequence after the Shrine of Water.
  16. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Sequence after the Shrine of Power.
  17. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Marketplace in Great Wimbish.
  18. ^Viridis (1994). Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i). Philips Media. Level/area: Closing sequence.
  19. ^ abcZelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). "Overview: CDi Series". Zelda Elements. Archived from the original on March 6, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  20. ^ abcdGameTrailers Staff (2006-10-22). "The Legend of Zelda Retrospective Zelda Retrospective Part 3". GameTrailers. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  21. ^ abcKohler, Chris (2008-03-24). "Game|Life The Video, #7: Nintendo and CD-i". Wired. Archived from the original on April 1, 2009. Retrieved 2008-04-07.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  22. ^GameSpy Staff (2008-01-01). "Nintendo: From Hero to Zero". GameSpy. Archived from the original on 2008-04-04. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  23. ^Wilson, Mark (2007-06-05). "This Day in Gaming, June 5th". Kotaku. Archived from the original on 2008-06-08. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  24. ^Zelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). "Overview: Link: The Faces of Evil". Zelda Elements. Archived from the original on March 14, 2009. Retrieved 2008-04-07.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  25. ^ abcThe Making of... Zelda: 'Wand of Gamelon' & 'Link: Faces of Evil'. Retro Gamer. Issue 27. p. 52-57. August 2006.
  26. ^ abZelda Elements Staff (2008-01-01). "Overview: Zelda: The Wand of Gamelon". Zelda Elements. Archived from the original on February 20, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  27. ^ abSchneider, Peer (January 26, 2002). "Hyrule Times Vol. 13: Zelda's Adventure". IGN. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
  28. ^ abcdefghBas (2007-03-08). "Zelda, Voyeur, and a man who worked on both CD-i projects..." Interactive Dreams. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  29. ^ ab"Philips + Viridis = Zelda".
  30. ^ abc"Nintendo Player – A Not-For-Profit Classic Gaming Fansite - Interview with Zelda's Adventure (Philips CD-i) Model and Prosthetic Maker Jason Bakutis". www.nintendoplayer.com.
  31. ^"New Nintendo Titles are in the Pipeline." CDi Magazine. Pg.4.
  32. ^Szczepaniak, John. Your Weekly Kusoge #03 - Zelda's Adventure - CDi (1995). HardcoreGaming101. 2011.
  33. ^ abcdCowan, Danny (2006-04-25). "CDi: The Ugly Duckling". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on 2012-07-20. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  34. ^Sharkey, Scott (2007-03-30). "Hey Covers...You Suck!". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on 2012-10-19. Retrieved 2008-04-07.
  35. ^Stuart, Keith (2007-04-19). "Technology: Gamesblog: Yesterday's games could be gold dust to collectors. The games are internet memes on Youtube". The Guardian. p. 3.
  36. ^ abThe Making of... Zelda: 'Wand of Gamelon' & 'Link: Faces of Evil' - Deserving Damnation. Retro Gamer. Issue 27. p. 57. August 2006.
  37. ^"Best Zelda Games Ranked Worst to Best". USgamer. June 4, 2019. Retrieved July 8, 2021.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zelda%27s_Adventure

I even went to the salon several times in the evening, but did not notice anything suspicious. At the same time, he himself had significant progress in his relationship with Nadezhda. The secretary of their company. Today is the day when they will have the opportunity to be alone.

He was returning from editing and his partner Temur asked to leave earlier, as he was in a hurry somewhere.

Similar news:

Fatigue showed itself, it made me sleepy. But I firmly decided to finish everything today. Yana. Do you want some tea. - I shouted to my friend and looked at her.



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