45 super

What Is the .45 Super Cartridge?

A Dash of History...

To explain the .45 Super cartridge, it might be best to give a little history lesson on its direct descendant, the venerable .45 ACP (Automatic Colt Pistol). The .45 ACP was designed in 1904 by John Browning, specifically for his new M1911 automatic pistol, which would go on to become the standard service weapon of the United States military from 1911 to 1985. That particular weapon is also the basis for modern 1911 style weapons.

The .45 Super is a modern redesign of the .45 ACP cartridge. It utilizes stronger powders, and strengthened brass, without losing any of its original dimensions, leaving it the same size as the original .45 Super cartridge.

Why Redesign What Works?

As it is with technology, what was new in 1904 is nearly ancient in the modern world. The .45 ACP is no exception to that rule. Since its creation, newer, more powerful forms of smokeless powder have been created, as well as more modern cartridges. While still considered one of the most reliable cartridges for home defense due to its size, the .45 ACP struggles to match other rounds in terms of power and speed in comparison with case capacity.

The reason is actually quite simple. In 1904, when the cartridge was first designed, the more powerful smokeless powders in use today had not yet been invented. The case walls and brass webbing were designed to handle the powder of the time, nothing more. That translates into the modern day pressure specifications of 21,000 PSI for .45 ACP, and 34,084 and 37,500, for 9mm and 10mm respectively. As you can see, the 9mm and 10mm can handle pressures just shy of double that of the .45 ACP.

What this translates to is that the .45 ACP cartridge uses less of its modern day potential for its size than more modern rounds. To give you an example, here is a picture of the different cartridges side by side, along with a chart detailing the ballistics data of the cartridges:

9mm, .45 and .44 Magnum Ballistics Chart

Company and CaliberTypeGrainMuzzle Energy (ft/lbs)Muzzle Velocity (ft/s)

Magtech 9mm

FMJ

115

330

1135

Federal 9mm

FMJ

115

356

1180

Blazer 9mm

JHP

115

335

1145

Magtech 9mm

JHP

115

340

1155

Buffalo Bore +P 9mm

FMJ-RN

124

465

1300

CorBon +P 9mm

JHP

115

466

1350

***

***

***

***

***

CorBon +P Pow'R'ball .45 ACp

FMJ

165

550

1225

Buffalo Bore +P .45 ACP

JHP

185

543

1150

***

***

***

***

***

Hornaday FTX .44 Magnum

JHP

225

993

1410

CorBon .44 Magnum

JHP

225

911

1350

As you can see, the .45 ACP, despite being one of the larger rounds being compared, is only slightly more powerful than the equivalent 9mm overpressure round. The solution that Dean Grennell, a well known firearms writer, came up with was the .45 Super, a modernized version of the .45 Magnum utilizing .451 Detonics brass, necked down to the proper size.

You would think that, being the same size as the .45 ACP, and more powerful, that you would have heard more about it, and it would have become standard for .45 ACP weapons. Chances are, if you're reading this, you haven't. The reason for that is also related to the original design of the .45 ACP, or rather, its platform, the M1911.

The second problem facing the .45 ACP and the weapons originally designed to fire it, is the lack of support in the barrel for the case head. This is acceptable, for the lower pressure .45 ACP rounds, but attempting to fire a .45 Super round out of an unmodified .45 ACP weapon can cause the .45 Super shell casing to bulge, and then burst, causing catastrophic failure in the firearm. In other words, weapons blowing up are bad, don't do it.

Firearms manufacturers came up with two solutions to this problem. The first, to create weapons specifically designed to handle and support the .45 ACP. The second, to design barrels for auto-loading pistols like the 1911 and Glock that support the shell casing fully. Many of the people I know have opted for the latter option, just like myself.

The .45 Super Cartridge

So, while we've established what the .45 Super is, and is not, it seems fairly clear that it is more than a little trouble to find a weapon that can fire it, or to set a weapon up to fire it. One might wonder, then, what exactly was accomplished by redesigning the cartridge? To that I reply: Take a look at these statistics on Buffalo Bore .45 Super ammunition....

.45 Super Ballistics Chart

Company and CaliberTypeGrainMuzzle Energy (ft/lbs)Muzzle Velocity (ft/s)

Buffalo Bore .45 Super

JHP

185

694

1300

Buffalo Bore .45 Super

FMJ-FN

255

654

1075

As you can see, it allows a significant increase in power and performance, in a weapon of the exact same size. In my case, out of the exact same weapon. That is not to say it does not have other drawbacks aside from the time spent converting the weapon. The ammunition is rather hard to find. Unless you reload your own ammunition, Buffalo Bore is the only company that I know of that currently sells .45 Super ammunition. Ironically, because .45 ACP is so expensive, Buffalo Bore's .45 Super ammunition is actually almost on part with .45 ACP price, however.

Thank you for reading, and I hope the information contained helped someone out there gain a better understanding of this strange, unique, and powerful cartridge. As always, any comments, corrections, and questions are appreciated and welcomed.

This content is accurate and true to the best of the author’s knowledge and is not meant to substitute for formal and individualized advice from a qualified professional.

Comments

CD Morrissy on January 01, 2018:

You do NOT need a "fully supported barrel" firing factory power level .45 Super; the cases on Underwood ammo (for example) use a case with thicker brass and there is NO bulging issues at all, in a standard .45 acp 1911 barrel. I've shot hundreds of 185 gr (1300 fps/695 ftlbs) rounds with NO bulging whatsoever.

Zachary palermo on February 14, 2017:

Back in October I was looking to for a good 45 auto load for deer hunting, I did some research and the 45 super kept coming up, so I looked into it and after reading your article on how to convert a glock 21 to 45 super I decided to try it with mine. I used a 24 pound recoil spring with a stainless steal guide rod, and a loan wolf barrel, the gun shot high with the new barrel so i got an adjustable sight, which was only $20. All together the conversion cost me about $150. I purchased 45 super ammo from a company called underwood ammo, them an Buffalo bore were the only two companies I could find which sold the round and underwood was a little cheaper. Now my block 21 can fire standard 45 auto loads, 45+p loads and 45 super loads reliably, making it an excellent all around handgun

TomBlalock (author) from Hickory, NC on January 30, 2015:

Way late reply, due to work hiatus, but I seem to remember the XD's being ready right out of the box for it. That Glock reliability does come with a few quirks, and the slide angle is one of them.

gunny45acp on August 01, 2014:

Very interesting stuff! Thanks for the article.

We're the owners of an XD-45 as well as a XDS-45, and interesting to me that the XD doesn't require any barrel mods to use the 45 Super.

Considering the age of this article, I'm going to do some more research on the 45 Super rounds, and see what current availability is. I'd love to give it a try in the XD.

Do you suppose the Super would be usable in the XDS-45 without any mods to that weapon? Personally, I would think so, but...

Thanks again!

Ed Palumbo from Tualatin, OR on January 26, 2014:

Interesting Hub! I've appreciated the .45 ACP since I was 18, but I enjoy working with and handloading a broad spectrum of centerfire cartridges.

TomBlalock on November 30, 2012:

Ack, I meant the xdm-45. That applies to both, however.

TomBlalock on November 30, 2012:

A .45 Super cartidge can be fired with no modification at all from a XD-45. However, I would recommend a heavier recoil spring in your XD-45 if you're planning to actually shoot .45 Super regularly out of it. The frame does take a tiny bit of battering without that heavier spring on it.

You can use an aftermarket barrel if you so choose, but it isn't a necessity.

isaac on November 30, 2012:

can the 45 xdm be converted for 45 super rds and where do i find a kit - thx

TomBlalock (author) from Hickory, NC on June 02, 2012:

I highly recommend it. Be happy to answer any questions you have on the matter, as well. Just let me know if I can help!

TomBlalock (author) from Hickory, NC on May 03, 2012:

Thanks for the compliment, and the welcome. My camera is a Nikon Coolpix P90, and it's REALLY not condusive to indoor pictures. The internal program it uses to balance light and focus the picture just doesn't handle the indoors very well at all. I'm surprised the pictures were even useable, personally.

Luis E Gonzalez from Miami, Florida on May 03, 2012:

Very interesting and great images!

Welcome to HubPages

Sours: https://skyaboveus.com

.45 Super

.45 Super
TypePistol
Place of originUnited States
DesignerDean Grennell
Designed1988
Produced1988—Present
Parent case.451 Detonics Magnum[1]
Bullet diameter.451 in (11.5 mm)
Neck diameter.473 in (12.0 mm)
Base diameter.476 in (12.1 mm)
Rim diameter.480 in (12.2 mm)
Rim thickness.049 in (1.2 mm)
Case length.898 in (22.8 mm)
Overall length1.275 in (32.4 mm)
Primer typeLarge pistol
Maximum pressure28,000 psi (190 MPa)
Bullet mass/typeVelocityEnergy
185 gr (12 g) JHP1,300 ft/s (400 m/s)694 ft⋅lbf (941 J)
200 gr (13 g) JHP1,200 ft/s (370 m/s)639 ft⋅lbf (866 J)
230 gr (15 g) FMJ1,100 ft/s (340 m/s)618 ft⋅lbf (838 J)
Test barrel length: 5 inches (130 mm)
Source(s): MidwayUSA

The .45 Super is a powerful smokeless powdercenter fire metallic firearmcartridge developed in 1988 by Dean Grennell, a well-known writer in the firearms field as well as managing editor of Gun World magazine.[2][3] It is dimensionally similar to the .45 ACP round but has a thicker case wall and is loaded to higher pressures, which offers an average 300 feet per second (91 m/s) improvement in muzzle velocity over the .45 ACP.[4] The cartridge was co-developed by Tom Fergerson and Ace Hindman.[5]

Development history[edit]

In 1988, a Gun World article detailed Grennell's efforts to update the .45 ACP for the 21st century, a difficult endeavor due to the inherent design limitations of the veteran round.[6] Introduced in the early 20th century, the .45 ACP has a relatively large case capacity which was dictated by the relatively low pressure powders in use at the time of its development; as a result, it operates in the modest range of 19,900 – 22,000 copper units of pressure (CUP). In contrast, current day cartridges using modern nitrocellulose powders generating higher pressure can produce CUP in the 28,000 – 39,000 range.[6] As it was originally designed for lower pressures, the .45 ACP case has relatively thin walls and weak case head and web specifications; it cannot reliably contain increased pressures. The layout of most M1911 pistols' chambers presents yet another challenge in that the case head is not fully supported in the cartridge feed ramp area;[2] pushing the envelope in this critical area with too much pressure risks a catastrophic failure, resulting in a case bursting in the chamber.[6] To rule out such a dangerous possibility, Grennell chose to use brass formed from the stronger and more modern .451[1]Detonics, shortened to the overall length of the .45 ACP design.[2] Support for the case head was also addressed by adopting a new chamber and barrel design which supports the base area of the case.[6] Other areas of the model 1911 pistol design were also strengthened, including the addition of a heavier recoil spring and a strengthened firing pin redesigned to prevent primer material from flowing into the firing pin channel under high chamber pressures.[2]

Manufacturers such as Heckler & Koch GmbH currently offer pistols rated to fire .45 Super ‘out of the box’.[6] The Smith & Wesson Model 4506 and other models in the third generation 4500 series leave the factory with springs for the .45ACP, but feature full support for the .45 Super load when upgraded with a stronger spring. Although they will chamber, the firing of .45 Super rounds in non-rated standard .45 ACP automatics is not recommended, as doing so risks a case failure in the unsupported chamber and at the very least batters the slide and almost certainly shortens the life of the pistol.[6][7]

.450 SMC[edit]

The .450 SMC is a .45 ACP wildcat cartridge for use in robust .45 ACP firearms that uses a modified .308 Winchester case with a small rifle primer adapted for use in modern .45 ACP firearms. Only 1911 pistols or heavier firearms with upgraded heavier springs are recommended. A small rifle primer .308 Winchester case is first cut down then resized to .45 ACP specs ,then primed with a small rifle primer as opposed to using the lower pressure pistol primer. Using the higher pressure small rifle primer with .308 Winchester brass designed to withstand higher pressure rifle charges, gives this .45 ACP wildcat a safe and substantial power increase to the standard .45 ACP. It supports higher pressure due to the use of a parent case originally designed for rifle charges.

Ballistics[edit]

A number of bullet weight and velocity combinations are offered in .45 Super, including a 185-grain (12.0 g) bullet propelled at 1,300 ft/s (400 m/s), a 200-grain (13 g) at 1,200 ft/s (370 m/s) and a 230-grain (15 g) at 1,100 ft/s (340 m/s).[3][7] as well as other weight/velocities provided by Super Express cartridges and Buffalo Bore, such as 255-grain (16.5 g) at 1,050 ft/s (320 m/s).

Current status[edit]

Sedalia, Missouri-based Starline Brass company eventually began marketing factory-manufactured brass cases for the chambering, taking the round out of the obscure wildcat cartridge realm. In addition, Ace Custom .45's Inc. of Cleveland, Texas, trademarked the .45 Super name in 1994 and used to market factory .45 Super pistols, as well as gunsmith adaptations of .45 ACP pistols, and .45 ACP conversion kits. Ace Custom .45's Inc has since gone out of business and their website is down.[8] Texas Ammunition, Underwood Ammo,[9] and Buffalo Bore[10] offer factory loaded ammunition which is marketed by Ace Custom and others.[3][6] The Dan Wesson .460 Rowland will also chamber a .45 Super.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab"Short History of the .451 Detonics Magnum". Z3BigDaddy. August 5, 2012.
  2. ^ abcd"1911 Hot Rods" Handguns Magazine website. Accessed March 11, 2008.
  3. ^ abc"VERSATILITY AND POWER THE ‘45SUPER’ CONCEPT"Archived February 17, 2008, at the Wayback Machine Ace Custom .45s website Accessed March 11, 2008.
  4. ^".45 Super" Everything Development Company website. Accessed March 11, 2008.
  5. ^Cengage Learning
  6. ^ abcdefg".45 Automatic" Notpurfect website. Accessed February 25, 2008.
  7. ^ ab"Starline Product Information & Descriptions"Archived April 24, 2008, at the Wayback Machine Starline Brass website. Accessed March 11, 2008.
  8. ^"Acecustom45s.com". www.acecustom45s.com. Retrieved September 21, 2015.
  9. ^"45 Super | Underwood Ammo | Pistol Ammunition | Self- Defense | Ammo". www.underwoodammo.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2015. Retrieved September 21, 2015.
  10. ^"Buffalo Bore .45 Super Ammo".
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.45_Super
  1. Church christmas stage design ideas
  2. Amx 32
  3. Shrooms reddit

.45 Super Results in fps

.45 Super and .450 SMC (Short Magnum Cartridge) are two relatively recent variations on the classic .45 ACP cartridge.  They were designed to gain more power from the cartridge than it was originally designed to produce, using modern smokeless powder and more robust case specifications.  And these rounds achieve this goal, producing about 100% greater muzzle energy for a given bullet weight over standard pressure .45 ACP rounds, and about a 50% increase over .45 ACP +P (over-pressure) rounds.

This increase in velocity/energy comes with higher chamber pressure, however.  The increased pressure means more stress on the firearm, resulting in increased wear and potential failure of the gun.  While the .45 Super/.450 SMC cartridge will fit into any standard .45 ACP firearm, you should exercise discretion in using those cartridges, either limiting how much you use them and/or upgrading your firearm to handle the increased pressure.  Be safe.

Of the 12 types of ammunition listed below, only the Double Tap ammo was the .450 SMC configuration (which is identical to the .45 Super cartridge, except that it has a small primer).  All the others are .45 Super.

Click here for a Muzzle Energy graph for the tests in this caliber.

 

Other Resources

BBTI is not the end-all of ballistics testing, just one more component available for the common good.  In addition to extensive discussion about ballistics to be found at many gun forums, here are some other great resources pertaining to ballistics testing you should check out.  (And if you would like to recommend a site to list here, please send an email.)
  • BrassFetcher:  excellent resource, with an emphasis on bullet performance in ballistic gelatin
  • The Box O' Truth:  testing ammo penetration through various barriers
  • Terminal Ballistics Research:  Specializes in the research of cartridge & projectile performance, using hard data gathered from 20 years of hunting game.

Acknowledgements

We'd like to personally and specifically thank Pat Childs at Fin & Feather in Iowa City, as he not only helped get most of our ammunition and other supplies, he was the brilliant gunsmith who worked with us to make this insane project much more practical.  Without his help all of this would have been much more difficult and perhaps impossible.  Anyone who uses our data owes him a debt of gratitude.

And thanks to our spouses, who were not just tolerant but enthusiastically supportive of this rather nutty project.

Disclaimer

This project, and all of its results, is only our fault.  We (well, Jim K, mostly) paid for everything ourselves, and we did not receive any kind of sponsorship or remuneration from anyone.  We did all the work.  We used products we were either familiar with, or because they were what was available, and mentioning them by name does not constitute an endorsement of any kind.  Furthermore, the data is provided purely for entertainment purposes - to better facilitate arguments over what ammo or caliber or gun is "best."  How you use the data is entirely up to you.  And if you think you could do better, feel free to spend the money and do the work and publish your own results.  Or not.  Your choice.

 

Sours: http://www.ballisticsbytheinch.com/45super.html

The 45 Super*

 
  45 Super 

(Click Above for More Gun Related Links)  


    I am a big fan of the 45 Super cartrige.  I first ran across it in Dean Grinell's book "The Book of  the 45".  The concept is
    simple: take the .45 acp and update it to modern ballistics by giving it thicker brass to withstand higher pressures. This is the same basic process used to upgrade the .38 acp to the .38 Super cartridge. 
    Here is what Wikipedia has to say about it:

    The .45 Super is a large and powerful smokeless powder center fire metallic firearm cartridge developed in 1988 by Dean Grennell, a well-known writer in the firearms field as well as managing editor of Gun World magazine. Born of a desire to update and improve the 1906 era .45 ACP, the .45 Super cartridge is dimensionally identical with the older .45 ACP round. A notable difference is that it has a thicker case wall than its ACP brethren cartridge, and the Super is loaded to higher pressures, which makes it a substantially more powerful round than the standard .45 ACP. It offers an average 300 foot per second (ft/s) improvement in muzzle velocity.  The cartridge was co-developed by Tom Fergerson and Ace Hindman.

    In 1988, a Gun World article detailed Grennell's efforts to update the .45 ACP for the 21st Century, a difficult endeavor due to the inherent design limitations of the veteran round. Introduced in the early 20th Century, the .45 ACP has a relatively large case capacity which was dictated by the relatively low pressure powders in use at the time of its development; as a result, it operates in the modest range of 19,900 – 22,000 Copper units of pressure (CUP). In contrast, current day cartridges using modern nitrocellulose powders generating higher pressure can produce a CUP in the 28,000 – 39,000 range. As it was originally designed for lower pressures, the .45 ACP case has relatively thin walls and weak case head and web specifications; it cannot reliably contain increased pressures. The layout of most M1911 pistols' chambers presents yet another challenge in that the case head is not fully supported in the cartridge feed ramp area; pushing the envelope in this critical area with too much pressure risks a catastrophic failure, resulting in a case bursting in the chamber. To rule out such a dangerous possibility, Grennell chose to use brass formed from the stronger and more modern .451 Detonics, shortened to the overall length of the .45 ACP design. Support for the case head was also addressed by adopting a new chamber and barrel design which supports the base area of the case. Other areas of the model 1911 pistol design were also strengthened, including the addition of a heavier recoil spring and a strengthened firing pin redesigned to prevent primer material from flowing into the firing pin channel under high chamber pressures.

    Manufacturers such as Heckler & Koch (USP and HK45), and Springfield Armory, Inc. currently offer pistols rated to fire .45 Super ‘out of the box’. Although they will chamber, the firing of .45 Super rounds in non-rated standard .45 ACP automatics is not recommended, as doing so risks a case failure in the unsupported chamber and at the very least would batter the slide and almost certainly shorten the life of the pistol.

    The .450 SMC is a variant of the .45 Super with a smaller primer pocket, which is touted as being stronger due to having more brass in the web area.

    A number of bullet weight and velocity combinations are offered in .45 Super, including a 185-grain (12.0 g) bullet propelled at 1,300 ft/s, a 200-grain (13 g) at 1,200 ft/s, and a 230-grain (15 g) at 1,100 ft/s. as well as other weight/velocities provided by Super Express cartridges and Buffalo Bore, such as 255grain at 1050 ft/s.

    Sedalia, Missouri based Starline Brass company eventually began marketing factory manufactured brass cases for the chambering, taking the round out of the obscure wildcat cartridge realm. In addition, Ace Custom .45’s Inc. of Cleveland, Texas trademarked the .45 Super name in 1994 and currently markets factory .45 Super pistols, as well as gunsmith adaptations of .45 ACP pistols, and .45 ACP conversion kits. Texas Ammunition and Buffalo Bore offer factory loaded ammunition which is marketed by Ace Custom and others. The Dan Wesson 460 Rowland will also chamber a .45 Super.

My recent conversion of a Smith & Wesson M&P

What is the 45 Super?
 How to convert a Glock 21 to 45 Super

Glock 21sf  45 Super: 1000 rounds and many pigs later

RealGuns.com 45 Super Conversion

10mm Envy?  Try a .45 Super Conversion

Data from the defunct Triton Site



* ".45 Super®" is a Trade Mark of Ace Custom 45's Inc.

E-mail:[email protected]
Sours: http://www.45super.com/

Super 45

Use them as reflective plates. And call Violetta. Phaetooon. dear. whimper, whimper, whimper.

The top should be with a cutout, the tummy should also be visible. The skirt is no longer than 12. 7 cm, and is even shorter in the room. I felt so comfortable on her shoulder, her breasts.

Now discussing:

Oh, Arkady Fodionovich, you have finally hired yourself another assistant. Don't you watch the news, Tanya. Doctors advise to start immediately after a girl has a sexual interest.



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