2011 wrangler

2011 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sport CRD Review

JEEP WRANGLER REVIEW

Vehicle Style: 4x4 wagon
Price: $43,000
Fuel Economy (claimed): 8.3 l/100km
Fuel Economy (tested): 11.2 l/100km

OVERVIEW

It’s not for the faint hearted, Jeep’s Wrangler. But while built for the rough and tumble of the trail, it’s now a more user-friendly package.

The 2011 update even included some interior refinements to make the open top Jeep seem almost car-like... almost.

But while creature comforts are improved, the Wrangler is really all about one thing: under its skin is an off-roader capable of taking you places other light-duty SUVs can only dream about.

INTERIOR  |  RATING: 2.5/5

Quality: Interior fittings in the Wrangler look rugged and feel like they could withstand a thorough beating. There is no plush padding though; hard plastics are the order of the day. Perfect for their intended purpose.

Comfort: Though the seats are firm and don’t offer a lot of support, they hold up well on longer trips.

Rear passengers get a fairly upright seat with a short cushion and limited visibility (you may have to expect some grumbles from back there sooner into the journey).

Equipment: Remote central locking, heated electric door-mirrors, 17-inch alloy wheels, six-speaker CD/MP3/DVD audio, leather-trimmed steering wheel and gear knob, removable canvas roof, power windows and air-conditioning.

Storage: Rear cargo space is awkwardly shaped thanks to the Wrangler’s roll bars and optional Infinity sub-woofer.

With seats folded there’s a handy 935 litres of space, plus a removable under-floor bin, lockable centre console and net-pockets in doors and dash.

ON THE ROAD  |  RATING: 2.5/5

Driveability: Wrangler’s 2.8 litre intercooled diesel looks good on paper with 147kW of power and 460Nm of torque from as low as 1600rpm.

On the road though it needs a decent prod to get things moving, with a kerb weight of almost two tonnes (1987kg) dragging it down.

But, once rolling, the Wrangler feels strong with a thick torque band constantly on call.

That said, the five-speed auto is off-the-pace; its ratios are too widely-spaced and with shift patterns that don’t always flatter the engine. The available manual-mode is more responsive and a better way to modulate gear-shifts.

Refinement: Refinement is a hit-and-miss affair in the Wrangler. Engine clatter intrudes into the cabin at idle, and the nuggety tyres can roar up a storm on the freeway.

Wind noise is hard to pick (no mean feat considering the three-piece fibreglass roof fitted to our test car), and body rigidity is excellent.

Suspension: Solid axles and coil springs are employed front and rear giving 257mm of ground clearance. The high-pressure gas shock-absorbers are tuned for increased feel at low speed (for off-road situations), softening as speed rises.

The system works well, without the fidgety feel of some four-wheel-drives.

Braking: Weight truly is the enemy of the Wrangler, hampering its braking performance. On gravel though, the ABS tuning for the four-wheel disc-brakes works very well.

SAFETY 

ANCAP rating: Not tested.

Safety features: Dual airbags, electronic stability control, ABS brakes, electronic roll mitigation, height adjustable, pretensioning front seatbelts, and high-tensile steel roll bars are standard. Side airbags for front passengers are available as an option.

WARRANTY AND SERVICING

Warranty: 3 years/100,000km

Service costs: TBC

HOW IT COMPARES  |  VALUE FOR MONEY RATING:  4/5

Land Rover Defender 110 ($48,990) – Cast from the same ‘function-before-form’ mould, the Defender casts aside mod-cons for pure go-anywhere ability.

Less power and torque and not quite as trendy, but built to work hard no matter what’s thrown at it.

Mitsubishi Challenger LS 2.5DT ($47,490) – Challenger offers a more car-like experience, but is also very capable off-road. Rear seat passengers will appreciate the additional space and refinement. (see Challenger reviews)

Toyota FJ Cruiser ($44,990) – The petrol V6 powertrain may not suit everyone but the bold FJ Cruiser offers the same rugged, adventurous, lifestyle-oriented experience as the Wrangler.

Based on Prado mechanicals, the FJ is both refined and capable off-road. (see FJ Cruiser reviews)

Note: all prices are Manufacturer’s List Price and do not include dealer delivery or on-road costs.

TMR VERDICT  |  OVERALL RATING: 3/5

Despite its popularity in and around Australian cities, the Wrangler never quite feels truly at home in town.

This is a no-compromise off-roader, and steep climbs, muddy ruts and winding gravel trails are where it does its best work.

As an affordable way into the world of off-road adventuring, Jeep’s rugged Wrangler is hard to beat.

Sours: https://www.drive.com.au/reviews/2011-jeep-wrangler-unlimited-sport-crd-review/

Jackson Hole, Wyo.—Jeep will be the first to tell you the Wrangler is a unique vehicle. There is virtually no competition for it in the marketplace, and it has such a loyal and passionate following that it's the envy of the industry. The Wrangler JK (like the CJ, YJ, and TJ before it) has been Jeep's icon vehicle for several decades but toss recent ownership and economic crashes into the mix and you can see why this vehicle has been slow to make significant changes. We'll have to wait for a major update, but in the meantime, Jeep has subtly updated the iconic Wrangler with a new interior. Clearly, these first steps are small ones, but they seem to be headed in the right direction.

The Specs

Mike Manley, president and CEO of Jeep, knows he has a difficult task in front of him: Keep Jeep true to its heritage without ignoring the changing needs and desires of today's customers. Last year, Mr. Manley said they would "touch" every model in the lineup to improve in some way or completely redesign. We've checked out the new Grand Cherokee and see it as a huge step for Jeep in the segment and the industry (that's why we named it one of our Best of 2011 picks). On a more subtle note, Jeep's design team has tackled the angular and spartan 2011 Wrangler interior.

Mechanically, there is nothing new about either the two-door or four-door models (internally designated the JK) for 2011. All Wranglers still use the aging 3.8-liter V6, rated at 202 hp at 5400 rpm and 237 lb-ft of torque at 4000 rpm, with a choice of four-speed automatic or six-speed manual transmissions, as well as front and rear live axles suspended by coil springs. Both Wranglers have a 15/19-mpg EPA rating, even though the four-door model weighs about 250 pounds more. For the most part, the changes to the 2011 model are centered on the dash layout. The head of Jeep Design, Mark Allen, wanted to soften up the interior by using more flexible and padded materials. Gone are the hard plastics on door handles and center console, replaced by soft-touch materials and new moldings. Headrests, as well, have been reshaped and designed to feel.

However, the biggest improvements and changes have come in the center stack and the front dash. The new design incorporates a more organic look, meaning there are fewer hard edges or sharp angles, instead following a more wavy look with rounded shapes moving over gauges, around vents, and surrounding grab handles. Technically, none of the controls or switches are moved, but just about everything Mark Allen could touch was redesigned to be easier to adjust or feel more substantial to the touch. In addition, redoing the entire instrument panel meant that engineers had the chance to make a few changes to the amount of insulation they could pack into certain areas, as well as modify the firewall a bit to reduce the number of holes for wiring. In the end, the use of new, softer materials, more insulation, a change in overall design and fewer holes in the firewall meant the inside of the new Wranglers not only looks better and is easier to use but is also quieter.

It's also worth noting, although it may not seem like a big difference, that all Sahara-model hardtops can now be color-matched to the rest of the vehicle. The new hardtops offer slightly better soundproofing and have almost 25 percent more glass area, helping to improve driver visibility as well as providing better interior lighting. Another improvement we like is the new standard steering wheel that offers audio and other vehicle-information controls, along with a few hidden Jeep Heritage details designed into the front windshield glass. Other new options include heated seats and mirrors, power mirrors and a 115-volt power outlet.

The Drive

Both two-door and four-door Wranglers have four different models (Sport, Sport S, Sahara and Rubicon) and range in price from $23,500 (2DR) to as high as $40,000 with all the options (4DR, nav, leather, premium audio, hardtop, etc). Most of our time was spent moving back and forth between a two-door Sahara and a four-door Rubicon, and it was a good thing, too. On the private ranch where Jeep set up its winter driving event, there was about 2 feet of snow on the ground and both 4x4 routes on the property had us following rock-strewn creek beds, a section through a dense wooded forest, and too many deeply rutted mud baths to count. With temperatures hovering around 25 degrees and a fast-approaching storm blanketing the Teton mountains on the horizon, we knew we were going to be pushing the Wranglers.

The nasty terrain we had to navigate had us selecting four-wheel-drive low range several times, as the Rubicon's aggressive tires dug into the frozen earth in one spot, throwing mud up the side of the body, then broke over a small hill climb, sliding on the snowpack. Rugged terrain is what the Wrangler JK platform and heavy-duty axles are designed for, and the front and rear locking differentials and sway-bar disconnect was a wonder to behold as it flexed over boulders, dropping tires into deep ruts. Thank goodness our Rubicon Wrangler was equipped with the extra-low (4:1) low-range gear and 4.10:1 axle ratios to overcome the anemic 202-hp V6 engine that is long overdue for an upgrade. In fact, Jeep's overall lineup offers three different V6 engines in three different models—the new PentaStar 3.6L (rated at 290 hp) in the new Grand Cherokee, the 3.7L (rated at 210 hp) in the Liberty and the 3.8L (rated at 202 hp) in the Wrangler. No doubt Jeep is planning to clean these issues up in the near future, but Jeep isn't giving away timing just yet; however, we'd guess the PentaStar will go into the full Wrangler lineup pretty quick, possibly even near the end of the 2011 model year.

The Bottom Line

This mid-cycle refresh to the 2011 Jeep Wranglers isn't likely to get a lot of attention, because most of the changes (admittedly all inside the vehicle) fall under the styling category. There's no doubt that the softer touch points, more organic look and easier-to-use knobs and buttons will be more appealing to new buyers, but make no mistake here: This is still a rugged SUV with deep old-school heritage, designed for off-pavement punishment rather than daily driving ride and comfort. We'd guess the creature-comfort attention Jeep is giving to the long-unrefined interior implies there may be bigger exterior and engineering changes in the next redesign, tentatively scheduled two years from now. We'll have to wait and see.

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Sours: https://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/reviews/a6250/2011-jeep-wrangler-test-drive/
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What Is It?

It’s the fanciest damn Jeep Wrangler you’ve ever seen. For 2011, all Wranglers get a new, more upscale interior in place of the previous assemblage of Playskool-grade plastics, and the optional hardtop can be painted body color on Sahara editions like our test vehicle. Available new features include heated seats, heated power mirrors, automatic climate control, and a steering wheel with buttons for the radio, cruise control, and Bluetooth phone connection. Stability control is now standard, there are more power outlets in the cabin, and the rear windows have been enlarged, too. It seems the Wrangler is all growed up.

How Does It Drive?

Well, maybe not all growed up. Driving a Wrangler on the road still feels a bit like sprinting down a cobblestone street while wearing wooden clogs, so the Jeep isn’t very competitive if you’re looking at it from a purely dynamics standpoint. (Previous four-door Wranglers we’ve tested have turned in appalling 0.61-g skidpad and 217-foot 70-to-0-mph braking figures.) But piloting a Wrangler has always had a charm all its own, and this 2011 is no different, offering more of a man-and-machine connection than about anything else on sale today. Although the new interior duds make comparisons to less-hard-core SUVs—the ones people drive to Starbucks and never take off-road—more relevant than ever, this remains a one-of-a-kind vehicle that’s fun in almost any weather and over almost any terrain, category five hurricanes and lava fields (just barely) excluded.

Increased sound deadening means less noise than before makes it to occupants, which is a good thing, because the groaning coming from the weak-sauce 202-hp, 3.8-liter V-6 is extremely unpleasant. The optional four-speed automatic in our Wrangler is an abomination, too—better to stick with the six-speed manual, which is at least more entertaining. A much better powertrain—namely, Chrysler’s new corporate V-6, likely available with a six-speed automatic—will arrive next year, and it should cure the Wrangler’s glacially slow acceleration.

How Does It Stack Up?

Against more on-road-centric competition—so, everything else—the Wrangler is less civilized and not as dynamically capable. As we said, the interior invites such comparisons more than ever, but if you’re after a grocery getter, the Wrangler still isn’t for you. This is a vehicle for people with adventure on their minds, even if it’s not on their agenda; it’s just that those folks now get to enjoy more modern amenities and quality interior materials. The soft-touch surfaces and attractive design are great, and we particularly like the brand touchstones sprinkled throughout the cabin, including the Jeep grille logo on the windshield above the rearview mirror and the “Since 1941” insert for the front passenger’s dash-mounted grab handle. Plus, with the painted hardtop and fender flares, the Sahara Unlimited sort of—sort of—looks like a Mercedes-Benz G-wagen. From the back. If you squint.

What’s the Cost?

In the case of our test vehicle, pretty high. The Unlimited Sahara starts at $30,695, and ours had an additional $5800 worth of options, including the $385 Connectivity Group (USB port, voice control), a $490 set of front side airbags, the $825 automatic transmission—charging that much for a four-speed seems criminal—and automatic climate control, which costs $895. In addition, the heated front seats run $250, remote start is $200, and the painted hardtop is $1715. Finally, we had a chance to experience Chrysler’s new nav system as part of the $1035 Media Center pack, which includes a 6.5-inch touchscreen and a hard-drive-based music storage setup. The nav is powered by Garmin software and works very well; it’s as easy to use as Garmin’s aftermarket units.

The final tally was $36,490, which is a lot of moola in Wrangler-land. The same money can buy any number of more civilized options, but if customers decide a Wrangler is exactly what they want, then the amount is far less obscene. After all, where else are they going to get all-terrain invincibility, buckets of personality, four-door rooflessness, and an interior this well done? Nowhere but this Jeep.

Specifications

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, 4-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door convertible

PRICE AS TESTED: $36,490 (base price: $30,695)

ENGINE TYPE: pushrod 12-valve V-6, iron block and aluminum heads, port fuel injection

Displacement: 231 cu in, 3778 cc
Power: 202 bhp @ 5200 rpm
Torque: 237 lb-ft @ 4000 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 4-speed automatic

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 116.0 in
Length: 173.4 in
Width: 73.9 in Height: 70.8 in
Curb weight (C/D est): 4600 lb

PERFORMANCE (C/D EST):
Zero to 60 mph: 11.5 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 18.3 sec
Top speed (governor limited): 99 mph

FUEL ECONOMY:
EPA city/highway driving: 15/19 mpg


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This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a15124825/2011-jeep-wrangler-unlimited-sahara-4x4-review/

Be Smart, Check in Advance. CARFAX — Your Vehicle History.

CARFAX — Your Vehicle History Expert

Sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but that's not the case when buying a used car. As an independent vehicle history provider, at CARFAX we've made it our mission to tell you everything you need to know by uncovering as many events as possible from the previous life of a used car. Our primary goal is to help you get to know your next car from the inside out before deciding to make an investment that will be part of you and your family's everyday life. We believe your next car shouldn't be hiding anything from you.

CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

But more than anything else, we don't want you or your family unknowingly sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle that isn't 100% safe. This is why we strive to take these vehicles off the road, which not only makes the used car market safer but our streets safer too.

CARFAX — 35+ Years of Experience in Vehicle Histories

CARFAX was founded in the US in 1984 and expanded into Europe in 2007. Around 100 team members spread across six European offices process vehicle information from 22 countries.

Fostering strategic partnerships with registration authorities, law enforcement agencies, government departments, insurance companies, inspection centers and numerous other leading companies around the world has enabled us to compile a unique international database for vehicle histories. We use this database to help make the used car market more transparent. We give everyone in the process of buying a used car access to what is currently the world's most comprehensive source for vehicle history reports, and is growing day by day.

We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Research-2011-Jeep-Wrangler_z2277

Wrangler 2011

Be Smart, Check in Advance. CARFAX — Your Vehicle History.

CARFAX — Your Vehicle History Expert

Sometimes what you don't know can't hurt you, but that's not the case when buying a used car. As an independent vehicle history provider, at CARFAX we've made it our mission to tell you everything you need to know by uncovering as many events as possible from the previous life of a used car. Our primary goal is to help you get to know your next car from the inside out before deciding to make an investment that will be part of you and your family's everyday life. We believe your next car shouldn't be hiding anything from you.

CARFAX Vehicle History Reports contain over 28 billion historical records from 20 European countries, the US and Canada, which are updated daily with new information.

Even if you live in a country we don't collect vehicle data from, it's still always worth checking the Vehicle Identification Number without obligation. The used car import and export market is booming and many owners would be surprised to find out exactly what happened to their vehicle during its previous life abroad.

Privacy for Customers — Transparency over Vehicles

Let's be clear: Although we strive to find every detail of a vehicle's life so far, we are focused only on the vehicle's history, and do not collect any information on previous owners. The information we provide relates solely to the vehicle, its odometer reading, any accidents that have been covered up, where the vehicle comes from and much more — it never gets personal. We've uncovered irreparable damage several times in the past, but other times our vehicle history checks draw a blank — and sometimes that's actually a good thing.

Second Hand — Not Second Best

Did you know that considerably more used cars are sold than new cars? We think this second-hand system is nothing short of fantastic. However, it goes without saying that it gives rise to different methods and tactics: Some sellers will disguise a car that's been in an accident under a fresh coat of paint, tamper with the odometer or conceal theft. This is one of the less appealing aspects of buying second hand. Our goal is to establish trusting relationships between buyers and sellers, since this is the best way to help customers make the right decision. Your new car should be reliable and make you feel safe, as well as make you feel like you haven't paid too much.

But more than anything else, we don't want you or your family unknowingly sitting behind the wheel of a vehicle that isn't 100% safe. This is why we strive to take these vehicles off the road, which not only makes the used car market safer but our streets safer too.

CARFAX — 35+ Years of Experience in Vehicle Histories

CARFAX was founded in the US in 1984 and expanded into Europe in 2007. Around 100 team members spread across six European offices process vehicle information from 22 countries.

Fostering strategic partnerships with registration authorities, law enforcement agencies, government departments, insurance companies, inspection centers and numerous other leading companies around the world has enabled us to compile a unique international database for vehicle histories. We use this database to help make the used car market more transparent. We give everyone in the process of buying a used car access to what is currently the world's most comprehensive source for vehicle history reports, and is growing day by day.

We remain neutral and independent despite our partnerships — our sole purpose is help customers make an informed choice and ensure their safety and the safety of their family. This includes never collecting any personal details — we do not accept any PII from data sources amongst the information we provide about a vehicle. We ensure that data protection laws are observed at all times. Furthermore, we always collect our data in compliance with legal and regulatory frameworks — in all the countries in which we are active. We expressly distance ourselves from illegal activities such as data theft, scraping and hacking.

Sours: https://www.carfax.com/Used-2011-Jeep-Wrangler_z2277

Store as soon as possible. But somewhere in the middle of the road from my house to the grocery supermarket there was a shopping center, even if it. Was not very large, but it was already my sixth story, in which I will describe another sexual adventure that happened to me.

Those who have not read my previous stories will briefly remind about myself. I am an ordinary Ukrainian girl.

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Although she was ashamed to play with him, did not mind when I pleased her, along with him. Its use partially satisfied my perversion cravings, but only for a short time. The next step was to purchase a video camera, on which I began to shoot my naked wife and our lovemaking.



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