Psalms 34

Psalms 34 DEFAULT

Psalm 34 – Praise from the Cave

This psalm is titled A Psalm of David when he pretended madness before Abimelech, who drove him away, and he departed. A fugitive from Saul, David went to the Philistine city of Gath but found no refuge there and narrowly escaped. Those events are recorded in 1 Samuel 21:10-22:1. Following that, David went to the cave at Adullam where many desperate men joined him. This joyful and wise psalm seems to have been written from that cave, and sung in the presence of those men.

The structure of this psalm is an acrostic, or nearly so. Each verse begins with another letter of the Hebrew alphabet, except for the letter waw. The purpose of the acrostic format in this psalm mainly seems to be as a device used to encourage learning and memorization.

Abimelech was probably a title given to rulers among the Philistines; the ruler’s proper name was Achish (1 Samuel 21:10).

A. Calling God’s people to praise.

1. (1-2) A life overflowing with praise.

I will bless the LORD at all times;
His praise shall continually be in my mouth.
My soul shall make its boast in the LORD;
The humble shall hear of it and be glad.

a. I will bless the LORD at all times: Given the title of this psalm and its historical setting, we see David triumphant and relieved at God’s rescue when he was held by the Philistines (1 Samuel 21:10-22:1).

i. “He may have acted like a fool, but he was not so foolish as to neglect praise of him who was his only true wisdom. He may have been hiding in a dismal cave, but this psalm tells us that in his heart he was hiding in the Lord.” (Boice)

ii. Praise shall continually be in my mouth: “Not in my heart merely, but in my mouth too. Our thankfulness is not to be a silent thing; it should be one of the daughters of music.” (Spurgeon)

b. My soul shall make its boast in the LORD: David might have boasted in himself. The 1 Samuel account describes how David cleverly won his freedom by pretending madness, but he knew that the working of the thing was due to God, not his own cleverness.

i. “What scope there is for holy boasting in Jehovah! His person, attributes, covenant, promises, works, and a thousand things besides, are all incomparable, unparalleled, matchless; we may cry them up as we please, but we shall never be convicted of vain and empty speech in so doing.” (Spurgeon)

ii. Yet in a sense, David had little to boast of, from a human perspective. He had to humiliate himself like a madman to escape the Philistines, whom he had foolishly sought refuge among – even bringing Goliath’s sword with him to Gath!

iii. Therefore this is a humble boast of David, boasting in the LORD and even a bit in his own humiliation. “Paul, in his great passage on boasting, may have remembered this saying and this episode, and so recalled his own ignominious escape from another foreign king (2 Corinthians 11:30-33), and the lessons learned in such straits.” (Kidner)

iv. “The seeming idiot scribbling on the gate is now saint, poet, and preacher; and, looking back on the deliverance won by a trick, he thinks of it as an instance of Jehovah’s answer to prayer!” (Maclaren)

c. The humble shall hear of it and be glad: David won his freedom by a radical display of humility. Other humble people would be glad to hear how God blessed and rewarded David’s humility.

i. It’s significant that he calls the people of God in general the humble. It is as if being proud were a denial of God Himself – and in a sense, it is.

2. (3-7) The testimony of the delivered one.

Oh, magnify the LORD with me,
And let us exalt His name together.
I sought the LORD, and He heard me,
And delivered me from all my fears.
They looked to Him and were radiant,

And their faces were not ashamed.
This poor man cried out, and the LORD heard him,
And saved him out of all his troubles.
The angel of the LORD encamps all around those who fear Him,
And delivers them.

a. Oh, magnify the LORD with me: David knew there was something magnetic about the true praise of God. When one genuinely praises God, he or she wants to draw others into the practice of praise. If it is good for one to exalt His name, then it is even better to do it together with His people.

i. David thought praising God was to magnify Him – that is, to make Him larger in one’s perception. Magnification does not actually make an object bigger, and we can’t make God bigger. But to magnify something or someone is to perceive it as bigger, and we must do that regarding the LORD God.

ii. “As not sufficient to do a great work himself, he calleth in the help of others.” (Trapp)

iii. “The Christian, not only himself magnifies God, but exhorts others to do likewise; and longs for that day to come, when all nations and languages, laying aside their contentions and animosities, their prejudices and their errors, their unbelief, their heresies, and their schisms, shall make their sound to be heard as one, in magnifying and exalting their great Redeemer’s name.” (Horne)

b. I sought the LORD, and He heard me, and delivered me from all my fears: David’s simple testimony is still powerful thousands of years later. David sought the LORD – looked to Him in loving trust. God then heard His servant, with the implication that He heard him with love, sympathy, and action. God responded when He delivered David from all his fears.

i. Commentators are divided regarding whether or not David sinned when he feigned madness among the Philistines, or if he was obedient and guided by God. Morgan observed, “There does seem to be incongruity between David feigning madness to save his life, and this exalted outpouring of praise to God as the Great Deliverer.”

ii. “Wherein, whether he sinned or not, is matter of dispute; but this is undoubted, that God’s favour and his deliverance at that time was very remarkable, and deserved this solemn acknowledgment.” (Poole)

iii. “Even when I was in the enemies’ hands, and playing my pranks as a mad-man amongst them, I prayed secretly and inwardly.” (Trapp)

iv. Even if David sinned in feigning madness, God delivered him and did not abandon him. “It is easy to understand how, in the quietness and solemnity of that cave of refuge, he recovered, and that with new power, his sense of the Divine care and wisdom and might and sufficiency. So he sang.” (Morgan)

c. They looked to Him and were radiant, and their faces were not ashamed: In moving from “I” to “They,” David indicates that this experience was not his alone. Many others have known and will know what it is to set the focus of their loving trust upon God and receive His help.

i. They looked to Him: “The more we can think upon our Lord, and the less upon ourselves, the better. Looking to him, as he is seated upon the right hand of the throne of God, will keep our heads, and especially our hearts, steady when going through the deep waters of affliction.” (Smith, cited in Spurgeon)

ii. And were radiant: The idea is that they draw radiance from God’s own glory. Later, the Apostle Paul would explain much the same thought: But we all, with unveiled face, beholding as in a mirror the glory of the Lord, are being transformed into the same image from glory to glory, just as by the Spirit of the Lord (2 Corinthians 3:18). This radiance is evidence that one has truly looked to Him.

iii. “Radiant is a word found again in Isaiah 60:5, where it describes a mother’s face lighting up at the sight of her children, long given up for lost.” (Kidner)

iv. And their faces were not ashamed: David also knew that God would never forsake the one who trusts in Him. God would give him confidence in the moment and vindication in time.

d. This poor man cried out, and the LORD heard him: David again emphasized his personal experience of these truths. He was the one. He was the poor man who cried out to God, and God graciously answered.

· A cry is short, and not sweet.

· A cry is brief, and bitter.

· A cry is the language of pain.

· A cry is a natural production.

· A cry has much meaning and no music.

i. Acting the madman among the Philistines, David certainly was the poor man. “To get the force of David’s words one has only to recall his peril and his abject clowning to save his life.” (Kidner)

e. The angel of the LORD encamps all around those who fear Him: David narrowly escaped death among the Philistines. He was still a hunted, wanted man with King Saul determined to kill him. A rag-tag group of desperate losers gathered to him at Adullam. David was at a genuine low point; yet he was still filled with praise and trust, even knowing that God had an angelic camp all around him.

i. The triumph and joy of this song is so clear that it is easy to forget the life context of the psalm. “It is for people who find themselves at the absolute low point in life, which is where David was. Or find themselves between a rock, which in this case was King Saul, and a hard place, which was King Achish. It is for you when everything seems against you.” (Boice)

ii. David’s protection was real, even if it was invisible. He could not see the angelic presence around him, but it was real. Many times in the Old Testament, the angel of the LORD was an actual material appearance of Yahweh Himself (as in Judges 13). We don’t know if David meant an angelic being sent by God, or God Himself present with the believer. Both are true.

iii. “The fugitive, in his rude shelter in the cave of Adullam, thinks of Jacob, who, in his hour of defenceless need, was heartened by the vision of the angel encampment surrounding.” (Maclaren)

iv. Psalm 34:7 is one passage that gives support to the thought of a guardian angel for everyone, or perhaps at least for believers. One can’t say that this passage proves the idea, but it is consistent with it. “Let the consideration of these invisible guardians, who are also spectators of our actions, at once restrain us from evil, and incite us to good.” (Horne)

3. (8-10) An invitation to share the joyful testimony.

Oh, taste and see that the LORD is good;
Blessed is the man who trusts in Him!
Oh, fear the LORD, you His saints!
There is no want to those who fear Him.
The young lions lack and suffer hunger;
But those who seek the LORD shall not lack any good thing.

a. Oh, taste and see that the LORD is good: After telling of his own experience, David challenged the reader (or singer) of this psalm to experience God’s goodness for himself or herself. It could only come through a personal encounter, in some ways similar to a taste or to see.

i. Taste and sight are physical senses, ways in which we interact with the material world. In some ways, faith is like a spiritual sense, and with it we interact with the spiritual world. To taste and to see are like trusting God, loving Him, seeking Him, looking unto Him.

ii. “Taste, i.e. consider it seriously, and thoroughly, and affectionately; make trial of it by your own and others’ experiences. This is opposed by those slight and vanishing thoughts which men have of it.” (Poole)

iii. “As he that feels the fire hot, or as he that tasteth honey sweet, ye need not use arguments to persuade him to believe it; so here, let a man but once taste that the Lord is good, and he will thenceforth, as a new-born babe, desire the sincere milk of the word.” (Trapp)

iv. “Both Hebrews 6:5 and 1 Peter 2:3 use this verse to describe the first venture into faith, and to urge that the tasting should be more than a casual sampling.” (Kidner)

v. “There are some things, especially in the depths of the religious life, which can only be understood by being experienced, and which even then are incapable of being adequately embodied in words. ‘O taste and see that the Lord is good.’ The enjoyment must come before the illumination; or rather the enjoyment is the illumination.” (Binney, cited in Spurgeon)

b. Blessed is the man who trusts in Him: David was sure that the one who did taste and see – or, who trusted in God – would not be forsaken. God would make him blessed.

c. Oh, fear the LORD, you His saints: David thought that to fear the LORD was much like trusting Him and experiencing His goodness. This fear is the proper reverence and respect that man has for Deity. If you really experience God’s goodness, if you really experience the blessedness of trusting Him, you will also have an appropriate fear of the LORD.

d. Those who seek the LORD shall not lack any good thing: Even one as strong as the young lions may lack and suffer hunger; but David testified of God’s greater provision.

i. “The word ‘lions’ may be a metaphor for those who are strong, oppressive, and evil.” (VanGemeren)

ii. “Were there lions prowling around the camp at Adullam, and did the psalmist take their growls as typical of all vain attempts to satisfy the soul?” (Maclaren)

iii. David experienced a good thing from God in his deliverance among the Philistines. He knew that the good thing was not due to his own strength or might; it was the goodness of God extended to those who seek the LORD.

iv. “Although God doth usually take a special care to supply the wants of good men, and hath oft done it by extraordinary ways, when ordinary have failed, yet sometimes he knows, and it is certainly true, that wants and crosses are more needful and useful to them than bread, and in such cases it is a greater mercy of God to deny them supplies than to grant them.” (Poole)

v. “Paul had nothing, and yet possessed all things.” (Trapp)

B. Teaching the people of God.

1. (11-14) Living in the fear of the LORD.

Come, you children, listen to me;
I will teach you the fear of the LORD.
Who is the man who desires life,
And loves many days, that he may see good?
Keep your tongue from evil,
And your lips from speaking deceit.
Depart from evil and do good;
Seek peace and pursue it.

a. Come, you children, listen to me: Following David’s deliverance from feigned madness among the Philistines, many who were in distress, in debt, or in discontent gathered to him at the cave at Adullam (1 Samuel 22:1-2). It’s reasonable to think that David taught these men his own recent lessons of faith, including the fear of the LORD.

i. As David describes the fear of the LORD, it is rooted in action, not religious feelings. “David is saying that the fear of the Lord is doing right, that is, that it involves obedience.” (Boice)

b. Who is the man who desires life: David taught his unusual group of followers what one must do to see God’s blessing on his life – to live in the fear of the LORD.

· Keep your tongue from evil: David taught his men – rough as they were – that they should not speak evil.

· And your lips from speaking deceit: David taught them that a particular form of evil to avoid is that of lying and deceit.

· Depart from evil and do good: David spoke to his men about simply directing the life away from evil and toward good.

· Seek peace and pursue it: David taught his men to think not only in terms of war and battles, but in terms of peace, and the pursuit of it. Peace with God and among men should be sought.

c. And loves many days, that he may see good: David’s instruction of his men at the cave at Adullam was very much in light of the Old Covenant, by which he and the rest of Israel related to God. Under the New Covenant, God’s blessing is in Jesus Christ and received by faith, not only by our own obedience.

i. “To teach men how to live and how to die, is the aim of all useful religious instruction. The rewards of virtue are the baits with which the young are to be drawn to morality. While we teach piety to God we should also dwell much upon morality towards man.” (Spurgeon)

2. (15-16) Living under the watchful eye of God.

The eyes of the LORD are on the righteous,
And His ears are open to their cry.
The face of the LORD is against those who do evil,
To cut off the remembrance of them from the earth.

a. The eyes of the LORD are on the righteous: David continued to instruct his men, teaching them about the watchful eye and attentive ear of God upon His people. This was another aspect of the reward for those who lived the obedience described in Psalm 34:13-14.

b. The face of the LORD is against those who do evil: It was important for David’s men to also know that – particularly under the Old Covenant – there were not only blessings for obedience, but curses for disobedience. Those stuck in their evil and rebellion could find their remembrance gone from the earth.

3. (17-18) God, the helper of the humble.

The righteous cry out, and the LORD hears,
And delivers them out of all their troubles.
The LORD is near to those who have a broken heart,
And saves such as have a contrite spirit.

a. The righteous cry out, and the LORD hears: David reminded his men at the cave at Adullam that God’s attentive care is upon the righteous. David’s testimony was that God had delivered him out of all his troubles.

b. The LORD is near to those who have a broken heart: This teaching from David was wonderful for the men at the cave at Adullam to hear. They – being in debt, distressed, and discontent – were likely those with a broken heart and a contrite spirit. They were objects of God’s favor and salvation, not His scorn.

i. “Those whose spirits are oppressed, and even broken, with the greatness of their calamities…. Those whose hearts or spirits are truly and deeply humbled under the hand of God.” (Poole)

ii. “A bird with a broken wing, an animal with a broken leg, a woman with a broken heart, a man with a broken purpose in life – these seem to drop out of the main current of life into shadow. They go apart to suffer and droop. The busy rush of life goes on without them. But God draws nigh.” (Meyer)

iii. “Broken hearts think God is far away, when he is really most near to them; their eyes are holden so that they see not their best friend. Indeed, he is with them, and in them, but they know it not.” (Spurgeon)

iv. A contrite spirit: “‘The beaten-out spirit’…the hammer is necessarily implied; in breaking to pieces the ore first, and then plating out the metal when it has been separated from the ore.” (Clarke)

4. (19-22) God’s care for His righteous ones.

Many are the afflictions of the righteous,
But the LORD delivers him out of them all.
He guards all his bones;
Not one of them is broken.
Evil shall slay the wicked,
And those who hate the righteous shall be condemned.
The LORD redeems the soul of His servants,
And none of those who trust in Him shall be condemned.

a. Many are the afflictions of the righteous: David spoke from his own experience to his men at the cave at Adullam. Though he was relatively young, he had still suffered many afflictions, even as a righteous man.

i. “‘Many are the afflictions,’ but more are the deliverances.” (Maclaren)

b. But the LORD delivers him out of them all: This was the principle that answered the previous statement. Indeed, the righteous had many afflictions; yet God’s deliverance was real in David’s life and still is real in the experience of many of God’s people.

c. He guards all his bones; not one of them is broken: David could look at his own body and see that though he had endured many battles, accidents, and hardships – yet not one bone was broken.

i. According to the Gospel of John, David spoke not only of his own experience. He also spoke prophetically of the Messiah to come, Jesus Christ. John explained that the Roman soldiers who supervised the crucifixion of Jesus came to His body on the cross, expecting to hasten and guarantee His death in the traditional way – breaking the legs of the crucified victim. When they looked carefully, they learned that Jesus was already dead and they pierced His side to confirm it. John wrote, for these things were done that the Scripture should be fulfilled, “Not one of His bones shall be broken” (John 19:36).

ii. “Christ’s bones were in themselves breakable, but could not actually be broken by all the violence in the world, because God had fore-decreed, a bone of him shall not be broken.” (Fuller, cited in Spurgeon)

d. Evil shall slay the wicked, and those who hate the righteous shall be condemned: David had confidence in more than the rescue of the righteous. He was also confident that the wicked and those who hate would be judged.

i. Evil shall slay the wicked: “Either, 1. The evil of sin. His own wickedness, though designed against others, shall destroy himself. Or, 2. The evil of misery. When the afflictions of good men shall have a happy issue, [the affliction of the wicked] shall end in their total and final destruction.” (Poole)

e. None of those who trust in Him shall be condemned: David could proclaim that God would rescue the soul of His servants, and they would be found in a place outside God’s condemnation.

i. Many centuries later the Apostle Paul would write, There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus (Romans 8:1). Even under the Old Covenant, David knew something of this freedom from condemnation.

(c) 2020 The Enduring Word Bible Commentary by David Guzik – ewm@enduringword.com

Sours: https://enduringword.com/bible-commentary/psalm-34/

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1 (A Psalm of David, when he changed his behaviour before Abimelech; who drove him away, and he departed.) I will bless the LORD at all times: his praise shall continually be in my mouth.

2 My soul shall make her boast in the LORD: the humble shall hear thereof, and be glad.

3 O magnify the LORD with me, and let us exalt his name together.

4 I sought the LORD, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears.

5 They looked unto him, and were lightened: and their faces were not ashamed.

6 This poor man cried, and the LORD heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles.

7 The angel of the LORD encampeth round about them that fear him, and delivereth them.

8 O taste and see that the LORD is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in him.

9 O fear the LORD, ye his saints: for there is no want to them that fear him.

10 The young lions do lack, and suffer hunger: but they that seek the LORD shall not want any good thing.

11 Come, ye children, hearken unto me: I will teach you the fear of the LORD.

12 What man is he that desireth life, and loveth many days, that he may see good?

13 Keep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile.

14 Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.

15 The eyes of the LORD are upon the righteous, and his ears are open unto their cry.

16 The face of the LORD is against them that do evil, to cut off the remembrance of them from the earth.

17 The righteous cry, and the LORD heareth, and delivereth them out of all their troubles.

18 The LORD is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and saveth such as be of a contrite spirit.

19 Many are the afflictions of the righteous: but the LORD delivereth him out of them all.

20 He keepeth all his bones: not one of them is broken.

21 Evil shall slay the wicked: and they that hate the righteous shall be desolate.

22 The LORD redeemeth the soul of his servants: and none of them that trust in him shall be desolate.



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Sours: https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Psalms-Chapter-34/
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In Praise of God's GoodnessPs 34 Hebrew title: By David, who left the presence of Abimelech after pretending to be mad and being sent away by him.34 Title: 1 Sam 21.13–15

1I will always thank the LORD;

I will never stop praising him.

2I will praise him for what he has done;

may all who are oppressed listen and be glad!

3Proclaim with me the LORD's greatness;

let us praise his name together!

4I prayed to the LORD, and he answered me;

he freed me from all my fears.

5The oppressed look to him and are glad;

they will never be disappointed.

6The helpless call to him, and he answers;

he saves them from all their troubles.

7His angel guards those who honour the LORD

and rescues them from danger.

834.8: 1 Pet 2.3Find out for yourself how good the LORD is.

Happy are those who find safety with him.

9Honour the LORD, all his people;

those who obey him have all they need.

10Even lions go hungry for lack of food,

but those who obey the LORD lack nothing good.

11Come, my young friends, and listen to me,

and I will teach you to honour the LORD.

1234.12–16: 1 Pet 3.10–12Would you like to enjoy life?

Do you want long life and happiness?

13Then hold back from speaking evil

and from telling lies.

14Turn away from evil and do good;

strive for peace with all your heart.

15The LORD watches over the righteous

and listens to their cries;

16but he opposes those who do evil,

so that when they die, they are soon forgotten.

17The righteous call to the LORD, and he listens;

he rescues them from all their troubles.

18The LORD is near to those who are discouraged;

he saves those who have lost all hope.

19Good people suffer many troubles,

but the LORD saves them from them all;

2034.20: Jn 19.36the LORD preserves them completely;

not one of their bones is broken.

21Evil will kill the wicked;

those who hate the righteous will be punished.

22The LORD will save his people;

those who go to him for protection will be spared.

Good News Translation® with Deuterocanonicals/Apocrypha (Today’s English Version, Second Edition) © 1992 American Bible Society. All rights reserved. Anglicisation © The British and Foreign Bible Society 1976, 1994, 2004.
The copyright for the derivative work of Anglicisation pertains only to the text within the Good News Translation (GNT) that British and Foreign Bible Society adapted for British literary usage, consistent with Section 103(b) of the United States Copyright Act, 17 U.S.C. § 103(b).
Bible text from the Good News Translation (GNT) is not to be reproduced in copies or otherwise by any means except as permitted in writing by American Bible Society, 101 North Independence Mall East, Floor 8, Philadelphia, PA 19106-2155 (www.americanbible.org). All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage or retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Sours: https://www.biblesociety.org.uk/explore-the-bible/read/eng/GNB/Ps/34/
Psalm 34 (Taste and See That He Is Good) by The Psalms Project (Lyric Video)
Psalm 34
1
Psalm 34 Of David. When he pretended to be insane before Abimelech, who drove him away, and he left. [1]
1
I will extol the LORD at all times; his praise will always be on my lips.
2
My soul will boast in the LORD; let the afflicted hear and rejoice.
3
Glorify the LORD with me; let us exalt his name together.
4
I sought the LORD, and he answered me; he delivered me from all my fears.
5
Those who look to him are radiant; their faces are never covered with shame.
6
This poor man called, and the LORD heard him; he saved him out of all his troubles.
7
The angel of the LORD encamps around those who fear him, and he delivers them.
8
Taste and see that the LORD is good; blessed is the man who takes refuge in him.
9
Fear the LORD, you his saints, for those who fear him lack nothing.
10
The lions may grow weak and hungry, but those who seek the LORD lack no good thing.
11
Come, my children, listen to me; I will teach you the fear of the LORD.
12
Whoever of you loves life and desires to see many good days,
13
keep your tongue from evil and your lips from speaking lies.
14
Turn from evil and do good; seek peace and pursue it.
15
The eyes of the LORD are on the righteous and his ears are attentive to their cry;
16
the face of the LORD is against those who do evil, to cut off the memory of them from the earth.
17
The righteous cry out, and the LORD hears them; he delivers them from all their troubles.
18
The LORD is close to the brokenhearted and saves those who are crushed in spirit.
19
A righteous man may have many troubles, but the LORD delivers him from them all;
20
he protects all his bones, not one of them will be broken.
21
Evil will slay the wicked; the foes of the righteous will be condemned.
22
The LORD redeems his servants; no one will be condemned who takes refuge in him.
  1. This psalm is an acrostic poem, the verses of which begin with the successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet.


Sours: http://web.mit.edu/jywang/www/cef/Bible/NIV/NIV_Bible/PS+34.html

34 psalms

Psalm 34

This article is about Psalm 34 in Hebrew (Masoretic) numbering. For Psalm 34 in Greek Septuagint or Latin Vulgate numbering, see Psalm 35.

Psalm 39
Lilien Psalm 34.jpg

Psalm 34 by Ephraim Moses Lilien

Other name
  • Psalm 33
  • "Benedicam Dominum in omni tempore"
Writtenby David
LanguageHebrew (original)

Psalm 34 is the 34th psalm of the Book of Psalms, beginning in English in the King James Version: "I will bless the LORD at all times: his praise shall continually be in my mouth." The Book of Psalms is part of the third section of the Hebrew Bible, and a book of the ChristianOld Testament. In the slightly different numbering system in the Greek Septuagint version of the Bible, and in its Latin translation, the Vulgate, this psalm is Psalm 33. In Latin, it is known as "Benedicam Dominum in omni tempore".[1] Psalm 34 is attributed to David. The Psalm's subtitle, A Psalm of David when he pretended madness before Abimelech, who drove him away, and he departed,[2] derives from when David was living with the Philistines, but the account of this event in 1 Samuel 21 refers to the king as Achish, not Abimelech.[3] The psalm is an acrostic poem in the Hebrew Alphabet, one of a series of songs of thanksgiving. It is the first Psalm which describes angels as guardians of the righteous.

The psalm is a regular part of Jewish, Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican and other Protestant liturgies. It has inspired hymns based on it, and has been set to music.

Text[edit]

Hebrew Bible version[edit]

Following is the Hebrew text of Psalm 34:[4]

Verse Hebrew
1 .לְדָוִד-- בְּשַׁנּוֹתוֹ אֶת-טַעְמוֹ, לִפְנֵי אֲבִימֶלֶךְ; וַיְגָרְשֵׁהוּ, וַיֵּלַךְ
2 .אֲבָרְכָה אֶת-יְהוָה בְּכָל-עֵת; תָּמִיד, תְּהִלָּתוֹ בְּפִי
3 .בַּיהוָה, תִּתְהַלֵּל נַפְשִׁי; יִשְׁמְעוּ עֲנָוִים וְיִשְׂמָחוּ
4 .גַּדְּלוּ לַיהוָה אִתִּי; וּנְרוֹמְמָה שְׁמוֹ יַחְדָּו
5 .דָּרַשְׁתִּי אֶת-יְהוָה וְעָנָנִי; וּמִכָּל-מְגוּרוֹתַי הִצִּילָנִי
6 .הִבִּיטוּ אֵלָיו וְנָהָרוּ; וּפְנֵיהֶם, אַל-יֶחְפָּרוּ
7 .זֶה עָנִי קָרָא, וַיהוָה שָׁמֵעַ; וּמִכָּל-צָרוֹתָיו, הוֹשִׁיעוֹ
8 .חֹנֶה מַלְאַךְ-יְהוָה סָבִיב לִירֵאָיו; וַיְחַלְּצֵם
9 .טַעֲמוּ וּרְאוּ, כִּי-טוֹב יְהוָה; אַשְׁרֵי הַגֶּבֶר, יֶחֱסֶה-בּוֹ
10 .יְראוּ אֶת-יְהוָה קְדֹשָׁיו: כִּי-אֵין מַחְסוֹר, לִירֵאָיו
11 .כְּפִירִים, רָשׁוּ וְרָעֵבוּ; וְדֹרְשֵׁי יְהוָה, לֹא-יַחְסְרוּ כָל-טוֹב
12 .לְכוּ-בָנִים, שִׁמְעוּ-לִי; יִרְאַת יְהוָה, אֲלַמֶּדְכֶם
13 .מִי-הָאִישׁ, הֶחָפֵץ חַיִּים; אֹהֵב יָמִים, לִרְאוֹת טוֹב
14 .נְצֹר לְשׁוֹנְךָ מֵרָע; וּשְׂפָתֶיךָ, מִדַּבֵּר מִרְמָה
15 .סוּר מֵרָע, וַעֲשֵׂה-טוֹב; בַּקֵּשׁ שָׁלוֹם וְרָדְפֵהוּ
16 .עֵינֵי יְהוָה, אֶל-צַדִּיקִים; וְאָזְנָיו, אֶל-שַׁוְעָתָם
17 .פְּנֵי יְהוָה, בְּעֹשֵׂי רָע; לְהַכְרִית מֵאֶרֶץ זִכְרָם
18 .צָעֲקוּ, וַיהוָה שָׁמֵעַ; וּמִכָּל-צָרוֹתָם, הִצִּילָם
19 .קָרוֹב יְהוָה, לְנִשְׁבְּרֵי-לֵב; וְאֶת-דַּכְּאֵי-רוּחַ יוֹשִׁיעַ
20 .רַבּוֹת, רָעוֹת צַדִּיק; וּמִכֻּלָּם, יַצִּילֶנּוּ יְהוָה
21 .שֹׁמֵר כָּל-עַצְמוֹתָיו; אַחַת מֵהֵנָּה, לֹא נִשְׁבָּרָה
22 .תְּמוֹתֵת רָשָׁע רָעָה; וְשֹׂנְאֵי צַדִּיק יֶאְשָׁמוּ
23 .פֹּדֶה יְהוָה, נֶפֶשׁ עֲבָדָיו; וְלֹא יֶאְשְׁמוּ, כָּל-הַחֹסִים בּוֹ

King James Version[edit]

  1. I will bless the LORD at all times: his praise shall continually be in my mouth.
  2. My soul shall make her boast in the LORD: the humble shall hear thereof, and be glad.
  3. O magnify the LORD with me, and let us exalt his name together.
  4. I sought the LORD, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears.
  5. They looked unto him, and were lightened: and their faces were not ashamed.
  6. This poor man cried, and the LORD heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles.
  7. The angel of the LORD encampeth round about them that fear him, and delivereth them.
  8. O taste and see that the LORD is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in him.
  9. O fear the LORD, ye his saints: for there is no want to them that fear him.
  10. The young lions do lack, and suffer hunger: but they that seek the LORD shall not want any good thing.
  11. Come, ye children, hearken unto me: I will teach you the fear of the LORD.
  12. What man is he that desireth life, and loveth many days, that he may see good?
  13. Keep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile.
  14. Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.
  15. The eyes of the LORD are upon the righteous, and his ears are open unto their cry.
  16. The face of the LORD is against them that do evil, to cut off the remembrance of them from the earth.
  17. The righteous cry, and the LORD heareth, and delivereth them out of all their troubles.
  18. The LORD is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and saveth such as be of a contrite spirit.
  19. Many are the afflictions of the righteous: but the LORD delivereth him out of them all.
  20. He keepeth all his bones: not one of them is broken.
  21. Evil shall slay the wicked: and they that hate the righteous shall be desolate.
  22. The LORD redeemeth the soul of his servants: and none of them that trust in him shall be desolate.

Structure[edit]

The psalm could be structured in the following manner:[5]

  1. Vers 2-4: Hymn introduction
  2. Vers 5: Basic praising, preaching the fate of the Psalmist
  3. Vers 6-11: teaching, which is evident from his fate
  4. Vers 12-22: didactic poem 1.Vers 12: psalmist is now "teacher"
  5. Vers 13-15: Question - answer:
  6. Vers 16-22
  7. Collection of wise sayings.

It is an acrostic poem in the Hebrew Alphabet, with each letter of the Hebrew alphabet beginning a verse in sequential order; the lone exception is waw ( ו ), which begins the second clause of verse six. Verse 22, the concluding statement, begins with pe, outside the acrostic scheme. The Old Testament scholar Hermann Gunkel felt that the acrostic nature of the Psalm made any historical, or theological analysis impossible.[6] This psalm is an acrostic of confidence as is Psalm 25 with which it has many similarities.

Uses[edit]

Judaism[edit]

New Testament[edit]

Some verses of Psalm 34 are referenced in the New Testament:

Catholicism[edit]

According to the Rule of St. Benedict around 530,[13] this psalm was traditionally performed at the office of Matins Monday with monasteries.[14][15]

Currently, in the Liturgy of the Hours, Psalm 34 is recited Saturday from the first and third weeks and for the holy celebrations, the median time. It is often taken to church as a responsorial psalm.[16]

Musical settings[edit]

Heinrich Schütz composed a choral setting on a German metred paraphrase of Psalm 34, "Ich will bei meinem Leben rühmen den Herren mein", as part of the Becker Psalter.

Several musical settings focus on the verse 8, "Taste and see", which is suitable as music for the Eucharist. Vaughan Williams set it, titled "O taste and see", for soprano and mixed choir with organ introduction, for the Coronation of Elizabeth II in Westminster Abbey on 2 June 1953.[17] It was included as No. 3 of the 2015 album Psalms II by Shane & Shane, and as No. of the 2017 album Fractures by Sons of Korah.

References[edit]

  1. ^Parallel Latin/English Psalter / Psalmus 33 (34)Archived 7 May 2017 at the Wayback Machine medievalist.net
  2. ^Sub-title, NKJV Version
  3. ^1 Samuel 21:10–15
  4. ^"Psalms Chapter 126 תְּהִלִּים". mechon-mamre.org. Retrieved 22 August 2021.
  5. ^Corinne Lanoir in Römer, Macchi et Nihan 2009, p. 346.
  6. ^Herman Gunkel, Die Psalmen, (61986), 142f.
  7. ^The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 376
  8. ^The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 141
  9. ^The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 195
  10. ^The Complete Artscroll Siddur page 119
  11. ^ abcKirkpatrick, A. F. (1901). The Book of Psalms: with Introduction and Notes. The Cambridge Bible for Schools and Colleges. Book IV and V: Psalms XC-CL. Cambridge: At the University Press. p. 838. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  12. ^Nolland, John. The Gospel of Matthew: a commentary on the Greek text. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2005 p. 199
  13. ^Règle de saint Benoît, traduction de Prosper Guéranger, (Abbaye Saint-Pierre de Solesmes, réimpression 2007) p. 46.
  14. ^Psautier latin-français du bréviaire monastique (1938/2003) p. 137.
  15. ^La distribution des Psaumes dans la Règle de Saint Benoît.
  16. ^The main cycle of liturgical prayers takes place over four weeks.
  17. ^"O Taste and See (Vaughan Williams, Ralph)". IMSLP. Retrieved 29 May 2020.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Psalm 34.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psalm_34
The Brooklyn Tabernacle Choir - Psalm 34 (Live)

Psalm 34:1–22

1 I will extol the Lord at all times;t

his praise will always be on my lips.

2 I will gloryu in the Lord;

let the afflicted hear and rejoice.v

3 Glorify the Lordw with me;

let us exaltx his name together.

4 I sought the Lord,y and he answered me;

he deliveredz me from all my fears.

5 Those who look to him are radiant;a

their faces are never covered with shame.b

6 This poor man called, and the Lord heard him;

he saved him out of all his troubles.c

7 The angel of the Lordd encamps around those who fear him,

and he deliverse them.

8 Taste and see that the Lord is good;f

blessed is the one who takes refugeg in him.

9 Fear the Lord,h you his holy people,

for those who fear him lack nothing.i

10 The lions may grow weak and hungry,

but those who seek the Lord lack no good thing.j

11 Come, my children, listenk to me;

I will teach youl the fear of the Lord.m

12 Whoever of you loves lifen

and desires to see many good days,

13 keep your tongueo from evil

and your lips from telling lies.p

14 Turn from evil and do good;q

seek peacer and pursue it.

15 The eyes of the Lords are on the righteous,t

and his ears are attentiveu to their cry;

16 but the face of the Lord is againstv those who do evil,w

to blot out their namex from the earth.

17 The righteous cry out, and the Lord hearsy them;

he delivers them from all their troubles.

18 The Lord is closez to the brokenhearteda

and saves those who are crushed in spirit.

19 The righteous person may have many troubles,b

but the Lord delivers him from them all;c

20 he protects all his bones,

not one of them will be broken.d

21 Evil will slay the wicked;e

the foes of the righteous will be condemned.

22 The Lord will rescuef his servants;

no one who takes refugeg in him will be condemned.

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Sours: https://biblia.com/bible/niv/psalm/34/1-22

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Psalm 34

King James Version

34 I will bless the Lord at all times: his praise shall continually be in my mouth.

My soul shall make her boast in the Lord: the humble shall hear thereof, and be glad.

O magnify the Lord with me, and let us exalt his name together.

I sought the Lord, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears.

They looked unto him, and were lightened: and their faces were not ashamed.

This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him, and saved him out of all his troubles.

The angel of the Lord encampeth round about them that fear him, and delivereth them.

O taste and see that the Lord is good: blessed is the man that trusteth in him.

O fear the Lord, ye his saints: for there is no want to them that fear him.

10 The young lions do lack, and suffer hunger: but they that seek the Lord shall not want any good thing.

11 Come, ye children, hearken unto me: I will teach you the fear of the Lord.

12 What man is he that desireth life, and loveth many days, that he may see good?

13 Keep thy tongue from evil, and thy lips from speaking guile.

14 Depart from evil, and do good; seek peace, and pursue it.

15 The eyes of the Lord are upon the righteous, and his ears are open unto their cry.

16 The face of the Lord is against them that do evil, to cut off the remembrance of them from the earth.

17 The righteous cry, and the Lord heareth, and delivereth them out of all their troubles.

18 The Lord is nigh unto them that are of a broken heart; and saveth such as be of a contrite spirit.

19 Many are the afflictions of the righteous: but the Lord delivereth him out of them all.

20 He keepeth all his bones: not one of them is broken.

21 Evil shall slay the wicked: and they that hate the righteous shall be desolate.

22 The Lord redeemeth the soul of his servants: and none of them that trust in him shall be desolate.

Sours: https://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm%2034&version=KJV


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