Mitered handrail return

Mitered handrail return DEFAULT

Handrails need to meet the wall (or a newel post) at each end. These "returns" alert people that the railing has ended. Returns also protect folks from bumping into a sharp edge of the rail. Our expert cuts returns so they die into the wall at a 45-degree angle instead of a 90-degree angle.


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Keeping this in view, are handrail returns required?

Handrail Return Requirements. Handrail extensions must return to a wall, itself or the walking surface. Note: While it is a common practice to leave a gap between a wall return and the wall, some inspectors have rejected this as they consider it a return toward the wall and not a return to the wall.

Similarly, which side should handrail be on stairs? Both sides are better and safer too for installing stair railings. There are no standard rules. But mostly It is suggested on the right hand side as you go down the stairs. Very few stairwells are full walled on both sides, so the wall-mount rail is usually same side as the banister rail.

In this way, how do you cut a handrail return?

Cut both pieces at the same time with a handsaw to assure a match (Image 2). Cut the upper and lower ends of the rail using a miter box to get a 45-degree angle. Measure and cut the return pieces, or pieces of railing that return to the wall so items will not catch on the ends of the rail.

Why do handrails return to the wall?

Handrails need to meet the wall (or a newel post) at each end. These "returns" alert people that the railing has ended. Returns also protect folks from bumping into a sharp edge of the rail. Our expert cuts returns so they die into the wall at a 45-degree angle instead of a 90-degree angle.

Sours: https://findanyanswer.com/what-is-a-return-on-a-handrail

How to Install a Stairway Handrail

measure and mark wall for handrail

locate wall studs with stud finder and mark them

Measure and Mark Important Locations

Check the local building codes for height requirements of a handrail. Measure and mark the wall at the bottom and top of the stairs. Connect the marks with a chalk line (Image 1). Locate wall studs with a stud finder and mark them along the chalk line. Use a level to mark the bracket locations to make sure that they are plumb (Image 2).

Mount the Brackets and Clamp the Rail

Have a friend help hold the railing in position at the correct height along the chalk line, then position the bracket on the wall. Use an awl to punch holes through the mounting holes of the brackets. Drill pilot holes and mount brackets on wall. Clamp the long rail to the brackets and use a level to position the shorter piece.

cut rail ends at same time to assure match

Cut the Rail Ends

Use a combination square to mark the angles for the cuts on both rails (Image 1). Make a paper template of the angles needed to join two lengths of railing together and mark the ends of the rails. Cut both pieces at the same time with a handsaw to assure a match (Image 2). Cut the upper and lower ends of the rail using a miter box to get a 45-degree angle. Measure and cut the return pieces, or pieces of railing that return to the wall so items will not catch on the ends of the rail.

Use tape to secure joint while glue dries

Attach Returns and Rail

Spread glue on the ends of the rail and the returns. Attach returns and secure with L-brackets and screws (Image 1). Attach rail to brackets and secure with screws. Spread glue on the top end of the rail and the short rail and attach short rail to wall brackets. Use tape to secure the joint while the glue dries (Image 2). Reinforce the joint with a metal plate underneath the railing.

Sours: https://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/outdoors/landscaping/how-to-install-a-stairway-handrail
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How to Install a Stair Railing With Two 45 Degree Angles

To install a safe stair railing, you have to first understand staircase parts names and know how to measure accurately. A strong, durable stair railing can be relied on for safety and will make the stairs easier to use. Before buying any materials, though, you will need to complete careful measurements and planning to be sure you purchase the proper quantities.

Staircase Parts Names

A beautiful staircase and stair railing serve as the heart of many homes. While it may not seem like it, there are many different parts in a staircase. CRD Design Build shares a helpful diagram that points out the different staircase parts names. The treads are the horizontal parts of every step, and risers are the vertical spaces between the treads.

A staircase landing is the spot at the top or bottom. However, some staircases have intermediate landings in the middle where the treads change direction.

Balusters or spindles are the narrower posts along one side of the staircase that encloses it; these are above a base rail and beneath a handrail. Newel posts are large posts at the top and foot of the base rail and handrail. Staircases can also have stringers, or lengths of wood that are attached to treads and risers. Stair nosings are tread overhangs that stick out over risers.

Installing the Stair Railing

Now that the parts of a staircase have been identified, you can measure the nosing at the top landing to the floor at the very bottom of the steps and add 2 feet. This number equals the length of stair railing material you should buy.

Make sure that you shop for materials that are code-approved. You will also need some wall-mounted handrail brackets, two-part 90-second epoxy and 4 feet of 2x4 lumber. Buy three brackets plus one more for every 48 inches that is between the top and bottom of the railing.

Use a stud finder to locate the studs in the wall and mark them off. You need to mark off the standard railing height at the top and bottom; this is normally 34 to 38 inches above the front edge of the stair nosing. According to Family Handyman, the next step is to plumb up from the front edge of your top stair nosing and adhere another piece of tape to the wall here. Create a vertical line that is even with that front of the nosing and a horizontal line at the standard railing height; repeat this at the bottom tread.

Finishing Stair Railing Installation

Now, you must think about making handrail angle cuts. Use a miter saw to cut the rails to the right length first and then measure 3 1/2 inches from both ends and mark it off. Adjust your power miter saw for a 16-degree angle and use it on the horizontal top part of the rail. Do the same thing on the bottom in the opposite direction.

Test the fit of this rail joint and recut until you have a tight fit. Next, cut your short horizontal railing section to the right length with 45 degrees on the end. It should extend out a few inches past the next stud. For joining handrail angles, put the 2x4s at the same angles and screw them in on the ends.

Apply the 90-second epoxy and hold the joint together until it is connected with no gaps. Wrap the joint with masking tape and let this sit for 24 hours. Have a friend help you align the top of the stair railing with the marks on the wall (including the joint mark) and mark out each stud location on the railing. Center the brackets vertically on the studs, mark the screw holes, drill the pilot holes and install the brackets. Finally, attach your stair railing to the brackets and check everything to make sure that it is secure.

Things You Will Need

  • Stair railing materials

  • Wall-mounted handrail brackets

  • Two-part 90-second epoxy

  • 4 feet of 2x4 lumber

  • Masking tape

  • Stud finder

  • Miter saw

  • Screws

  • Drill

References

Tips

  • Use a foam brush to apply an even layer of a combination of oil-based stain and polyurethane varnish onto an unfinished stair rail. After the stain dries, smooth the surface of the rail with superfine, grade-zero steel wool.
  • If you find steps that do not have a stud in the wall near them, use a metal toggle drywall anchor to mount the rail bracket instead.

Warnings

  • Always handle power tools with care.
  • Ensure your adhere to the pertinent building code regulations.

Writer Bio

Danielle Smyth is a writer and content marketer from upstate New York. She holds a Master of Science in Publishing from Pace University. She owns her own content marketing agency, <a href="https://www.wordsmythcontent.com/">Wordsmyth Creative Content Marketing</a>, and she enjoys writing home and DIY articles and blogs for clients in a variety of related industries. She also runs her own lifestyle blog, <a href="https://www.sweetfrivolity.com/">Sweet Frivolity</a>.

Sours: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/install-stair-railing-two-45-degree-angles-20084.html
How to cut baseboard returns!

How to Return Wood Handrails

The "return" on a handrail is a cap piece cut from the end of the handrail at 45 degrees. The cap is then glued and nailed back onto the end of the handrail. This covers the end grain of the handrail and wraps the profile or "returns" the handrail around the end. The return can be extended to the wall if desired.

Things You'll Need:

  • Cloth
  • Cordless Drill
  • Nail Set
  • 1/6-Inch Drill Bit
  • Miter Saw
  • Hammer
  • Putty
  • Glue
  • 2 Nails, 3-Inch

Set the miter saw at 45 degrees to the right side.

Place the handrail on the left side of the miter saw fence. Cut off the end of the handrail.

Swing the saw back to 90 degrees. Flip the handrail upside down. Place it against the fence on the left side. Bring the blade down slowly, but do not turn the saw on. Get down at eye level and position the blade above the short point of the mitered edge, on the inside of the mitered edge.

Pull the trigger on the miter saw to activate the power. Cut down the mitered edge. When the saw has cut through the handrail, continue holding the saw down. Release the trigger while the saw is in the down position. When the blade stops spinning, let the saw return to its upright position. Remove the piece you cut off (the return) from the table and set it aside.

Swing the blade to the left-hand 45-degree preset; it will be opposite the first miter you cut. Flip the molding upright and miter the end.

Lay the molding on a worktable. Spread glue on the mitered end of the handrail. Stick the mitered end of the return against the mitered end of the handrail. Squeeze them together with your fingers until glue oozes out. Align the molding profiles. Wipe away excess glue with a cloth.

Predrill two holes through the return, using a drill and 1/6-inch drill bit. Hammer the 3-inch nails into the return. Set the nails just below the surface with a nail set. Fill the nail holes with putty.

Tip

If possible, cut two or three returns and choose the one that fits best.

Warnings:

  • The return is small and can get caught in the saw blade, so go slowly when cutting it. If it appears the return can get caught in the blade, release the trigger on the blade and let the saw blade stop without moving the blade up or down. Always wear safety glasses when working with power tools.

References

Writer Bio

Specializing in hardwood furniture, trim carpentry, cabinets, home improvement and architectural millwork, Wade Shaddy has worked in homebuilding since 1972. Shaddy has also worked as a newspaper reporter and writer, and as a contributing writer for Bicycling Magazine. Shaddy began publishing in various magazines in 1992, and published a novel, “Dark Canyon,” in 2008.

Related Articles

Sours: https://ourpastimes.com/how-to-return-wood-handrails-12407096.html

Handrail return mitered

How to Install Handrails on Staircases

By Wade Shaddy

Install a simple handrail in about an hour.

Handrail installation is straightforward, especially when using pre-made brackets and parts. Don't be intimidated by this task. Almost anyone can install a staircase handrail. The important thing is to anchor it properly and follow local code. You should purchase your handrail at least 24 inches longer than you need it to allow for returns on both ends. Returns are 90-degree elbows that butt into the wall.

Measure and mark the handrail at the length you need. Set a miter saw at 45 degrees. Place the handrail on the miter saw and cut a left-hand miter on one end, and a right hand miter on the other end. These are for the returns. Use the long points of the miter as the measurement.

Measure up from the nose of each step and make a mark on the wall at 36 inches with a measuring tape. Place a straightedge along the marks and draw a line on the wall. This is the height of the handrail.

Run a stud finder along the wall. Mark each stud on the line. Select studs that are 32 inches apart along the length of the line. If it doesn't work out to 32 inches that's OK. Just use studs that are no farther apart than 32 inches.

Place one of the handrail supports on the wall directly on one of the selected studs as if it were already installed. The top of the support should be 3/4 inch below the line. Using a 5/35-inch drill bit and drill/driver, drill pilot holes through the three holes in the bracket. Place 2-inch screws in the holes and drive them in to secure the bracket to the wall. Do all of the supports the same way.

Place the handrail on top of the supports with the mitered angles facing the wall. Center it end to end. Place a clamp on the handrail and one of the supports to hold it there temporarily.

Place one of the "U" shaped brackets over the bottom of the support. It has two wings on either side with holes in each side that fit flush against the bottom of the handrail. Place 3/4-inch screws in the holes and drive them in tight to secure the bracket to the handrail. It pinches the support to hold the handrail solid. Do all of the supports the same way. Remove the clamp.

Cut one left-hand miter, and one right-hand miter on the ends of the leftover pieces from the original miter cuts. These will be the return pieces that butt into the wall at 90 degrees. Measure to the wall from the long points on the handrail miters. Using the measurement, cut both returns off at 90-degrees measuring from the long points of the miters.

Apply glue to all four mitered edges. Fit the returns on the mitered ends of the handrail. Join the mitered corners and butt the square end into the wall. Use a pin nailer to shoot three1 1/4-inch finish nails through the mitered corners to fasten the return ends onto the handrail. Fill the nail holes using a putty crayon.

References

Tips

  • The measurement for handrail height is an example. According to code, you can install your handrail anywhere between 34 and 38 inches.

Warnings

  • There are other code regulations that need to be adhered to. Railings must project at least 1 1/2 inches from the wall. If you use manufactured brackets, they should allow for this and fall within regulation, but check them first. Another regulation states that stairways less than 44 inches wide may have one handrail or stair railing except that such stairways open on one or both sides shall have stair railings provided on the open side or sides. Always consult local codes before installing your railing.
  • Wear safety glasses.

Writer Bio

Specializing in hardwood furniture, trim carpentry, cabinets, home improvement and architectural millwork, Wade Shaddy has worked in homebuilding since 1972. Shaddy has also worked as a newspaper reporter and writer, and as a contributing writer for Bicycling Magazine. Shaddy began publishing in various magazines in 1992, and published a novel, “Dark Canyon,” in 2008.

Sours: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/install-handrails-staircases-62581.html
How to Install a Stair Handrail on Stairs - This Old House

How do you cut a railing return?

To find the length of the return piece, cut a 45-degree angle on a scrap of wood, and then cut a block of wood to the thickness of the desired gap between the wall and the railing (1-5/8 inch in this case). Place the 45-degree angle up against the fence and slide the 1-5/8-inch block up to that.

Click to see full answer.


Similarly, how do you cut a handrail return?

Cut both pieces at the same time with a handsaw to assure a match (Image 2). Cut the upper and lower ends of the rail using a miter box to get a 45-degree angle. Measure and cut the return pieces, or pieces of railing that return to the wall so items will not catch on the ends of the rail.

Additionally, what angle is a stair railing? The angle should be between 20 and 38 degrees.

Beside this, how do you cut a railing?

You can get professional results on a do-it-yourself handrail project when you know how to properly cut a handrail on an angle.

  1. Set the miter saw on a 45-degree angle.
  2. Cut the end of the handrail on a 45 degree mitered angle.
  3. Mark the rail for the top cut.
  4. Cut the handrail on the mark at a 45 degree angle.

How many steps can you take without a handrail?

To get to your question - the code doesn't refer to the exterior in steps but states from finished floor or platform to finished grade in excess of 30" requires a guard rail. It's with interior they mention any stairway with more than 3 risers (2 steps) will require a handrail.

Sours: https://askinglot.com/how-do-you-cut-a-railing-return

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