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2021 NCAA bracket: Printable March Madness bracket .PDF

Here is the official and printable NCAA bracket for the 2020-21 NCAA Division I men's basketball tournament, also known as March Madness. Baylor beat Gonzaga to win the national championship.

The 2022 NCAA tournament is scheduled to start with the First Four on March 15 and 16.

🚨 You can click or tap here to open the March Madness bracket as a .PDF in a new window.

NCAA bracket 2021: Printable March Madness bracket

Here is the complete schedule for the tournament, including times, links to live streams and TV networks:

2021 NCAA TOURNAMENT RESULTSLOCATION
First Four — Thursday, March 18
(16) Texas Southern 60, (16) Mount St. Mary's 52Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall
(11) Drake 53, (11) Wichita State 52Mackey Arena
(16) Norfolk State 54, (16) Appalachian State 53 Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall
(11) UCLA 86, (11) Michigan State 80Mackey Arena
First Round — Friday, March 19
(7) Florida 75, (10) Virginia Tech 70 (OT)Hinkle Fieldhouse
(3) Arkansas 85, (14) Colgate 68Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(1) Illinois 78, (16) Drexel 49Indiana Farmers Coliseum
(6) Texas Tech 65, (11) Utah State 53Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall
(15) Oral Roberts 75, (2) Ohio State 72 (OT)Mackey Arena
(1) Baylor 79, (16) Hartford 55Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)
(8) Loyola Chicago 71, (9) Georgia Tech 60Hinkle Fieldhouse
(12) Oregon State 70, (5) Tennessee 56Bankers Life Fiieldhouse
(4) Oklahoma State 69, (13) Liberty 60Indiana Farmers Coliseum
(9) Wisconsin 85, No. 8 North Carolina 62Mackey Arena
(2) Houston 87, (15) Cleveland State 56Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall
(13) North Texas 78, (4) Purdue 69 (OT)Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)
(10) Rutgers 60, (7) Clemson 56Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(11) Syracuse 78, (6) San Diego State 62Hinkle Fieldhouse
(3) West Virginia 84, (14) Morehead State 67Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)
(5) Villanova 73, (12) Winthrop 63Indiana Farmers Coliseum
First Round — Saturday, March 20
(5) Colorado 96, (12) Georgetown 73Hinkle Fieldhouse
(4) Florida State 64, (13) UNC Greensboro 54Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(3) Kansas 93, (14) Eastern Washington 84Indiana Farmers Coliseum
(8) LSU 76, (9) St. Bonaventure 61Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall
(1) Michigan 82, (16) Texas Southern 66Mackey Arena
(5) Creighton 63, (12) UC Santa Barbara 62Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)
(2) Alabama 68, (15) Iona 55Hinkle Fieldhouse
(6) USC 72, (11) Drake 56Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(2) Iowa 86, (15) Grand Canyon 74Indiana Farmers Coliseum
(10) Maryland 63, (7) UConn 54Mackey Arena
(13) Ohio 62, (4) Virginia 58Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall
(8) Oklahoma 72, (9) Missouri 68Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)
(1) Gonzaga 98, (16) Norfolk State 55Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(11) UCLA 73, (6) BYU 62Hinkle Fieldhouse
(14) Abilene Christian 53, (3) Texas 52Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)
(7) Oregon vs. (10) VCU — NO-CONTEST DUE TO COVID-19 PROTOCOLS--
Second Round — Sunday, March 21
(8) Loyola Chicago 71, (1) Illinois 58Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(1) Baylor 76, (9) Wisconsin 63Hinkle Fieldhouse
(11) Syracuse 75, (3) West Virginia 72Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(3) Arkansas 68, (6) Texas Tech 66Hinkle Fieldhouse
(2) Houston 63, (10) Rutgers 60Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)
(15) Oral Roberts 81, (7) Florida 78Indiana Farmers Coliseum
(5) Villanova 84, (13) North Texas 61Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(12) Oregon State 80, (4) Oklahoma State 70Hinkle Fieldhouse
Second Round — Monday, March 22
(7) Oregon 95, (2) Iowa 80Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(1) Gonzaga 87, (8) Oklahoma 71Hinkle Fieldhouse
(11) UCLA 67, (14) Abilene Christian 47Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(5) Creighton 72, (13) Ohio 58Hinkle Fieldhouse
(1) Michigan 86, (8) LSU 78Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)
(4) Florida State 71, (5) Colorado 53Indiana Farmers Coliseum
(2) Alabama 96, (10) Maryland 77Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(6) USC 85, No. 3 Kansas 51Hinkle Fieldhouse
Sweet 16 — Saturday, March 27
(12) Oregon State 65, No. 8 Loyola Chicago 58Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(1) Baylor 62, (5) Villanova 51Hinkle Fieldhouse
(3) Arkansas 72, (15) Oral Roberts 70Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(2) Houston 62, (11) Syracuse 46Hinkle Fieldhouse
Sweet 16 — Sunday, March 28
(1) Gonzaga 83, (5) Creighton 65Hinkle Fieldhouse
(1) Michigan 76, (4) Florida State 58Bankers Life Fieldhouse
(11) UCLA 88, (2) Alabama 78 (OT)Hinkle Fieldhouse
(6) USC 82, (7) Oregon 68Bankers Life Fieldhouse
Elite Eight — Monday, March 29
(2) Houston 67, (12) Oregon State 61Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)
(1) Baylor 81, (3) Arkansas 72Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (South)
Elite Eight — Tuesday, March 30
(1) Gonzaga 85, (6) USC 66Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)
(11) UCLA 51, (1) Michigan 49Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (South)

We tracked verifiable perfect brackets from all major bracket games throughout the entire tournament. The last perfect ones busted on Saturday. No one came within shouting distance this season of Gregg Nigl, who picked the first 49 games correctly in 2019 before his first miss.

2022 March Madness: Complete schedule, dates

Here are the dates, locations and tournament information for each round, including Selection Sunday:

ROUNDDATECITY/SITEVENUE
Selection SundayMarch 13N/AN/A
First FourMarch 15 and 16Dayton, OhioUD Arena
First/SecondMarch 17 and 19Buffalo, New YorkKeyBank Center
First/SecondMarch 17 and 19Indianapolis, IndianaBankers Life Fieldhouse
First/SecondMarch 17 and 19Fort Worth, TexasDickies Arena
First/SecondMarch 17 and 19Portland, OregonModa Center
First/SecondMarch 18 and 20Greenville, South CarolinaBon Secours Wellness Arena
First/SecondMarch 18 and 20Milwaukee, WisconsinFiserv Forum
First/SecondMarch 18 and 20Pittsburgh, PennsylvaniaPPG Paints Arena
First/SecondMarch 18 and 20San Diego, CaliforniaViejas Arena
Sweet 16/Elite EightMarch 24 and 26San Antonio, TexasAT&T Center
Sweet 16/Elite EightMarch 24 and 26San Francisco, CaliforniaChase Center
Sweet 16/Elite EightMarch 25 and 27Chicago, IllinoisUnited Center
Sweet 16/Elite EightMarch 25 and 27Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaWells Fargo Center
Final FourApril 2 and 4New OrleansMercedes-Benz Superdome

2021 NCAA Basketball Tournament Bracket

Here's a quick guide to how teams earn a spot in the NCAA tournament.

How are March Madness teams selected?

There are two ways that a team can earn a bid to the NCAA tournament. The 32 Division I conferences all receive an automatic bid (there were 31 in 2021), which they each award to the team that wins the postseason conference tournament. Regardless of how a team performed during the regular season, if they are eligible for postseason play and win their conference tournament, they are selected to receive a bid to the NCAA tournament. These teams are known as automatic qualifiers.

The second avenue for an invitation is an at-large bid. The selection committee (more on them in a second) convenes on Selection Sunday, after all regular season and conference tournament games are played, and decides which 36 teams (37 in 2021) that are not automatic qualifiers have the pedigree to earn an invitation to the tournament.

What is the March Madness selection committee?

The 10-member NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Committee is responsible for selecting, seeding and bracketing the field for the NCAA Tournament. School and conference administrators are nominated by their conference, serve five-year terms and represent a cross-section of the Division I membership.

How do they decide which teams get an at-large bid?

There are a multitude of stats and rankings that the Selection Committee takes into account, but there is no set formula that determines whether a team receives an at-large bid or not.

What's this thing called the NCAA evaluation tool?

The NCAA Evaluation Tool, or NET, is a tool for the committee to evaluate the strength of individual teams. It replaces the RPI and was approved after months of consultation with the Division I Men’s Basketball Committee, the National Association of Basketball Coaches, top basketball analytics experts and Google Cloud Professional Services. It includes game results, strength of schedule, game location, scoring margin (capped at 10 points per game), and net offensive and defensive efficiency.

What is the importance of seeding in March Madness?

The men’s college basketball tournament is made up of 68 teams. On Selection Sunday, before any tournament game is played, those teams are ranked 1 through 68 by the Selection Committee, with the best team in college basketball — based on regular season and conference tournament performance — sitting at No. 1. Four of those teams are eliminated in the opening round of the tournament (known as the First Four), leaving us with a field of 64 for the first round.

Those 64 teams are split into four regions of 16 teams each, with each team being ranked 1 through 16. That ranking is the team’s seed.

In order to reward better teams, first-round matchups are determined by pitting the top team in the region against the bottom team (No. 1 vs. No. 16). Then the next highest vs. the next lowest (No. 2 vs. No. 15), and so on. In theory, this means that the 1 seeds have the easiest opening matchup to win in the bracket.

What is a Cinderella?

Much like the titular character from the fairy tale, a Cinderella team is one that is much more successful than expected. Examples in March would be Villanova’s 1985 championship run, when the eighth-seeded Wildcats became the lowest seeded team to ever win the title, knocking off the heavy favorite Georgetown.

Who has won every NCAA tournament?

Thirty-six different teams have won a championship, but no team has won more than UCLA, which has 11, 10 of which came a span of 12 years from 1964 to 1975.

Previous March Madness winners

Here is the list of every men’s basketball national championship since the NCAA tournament began in 1939:

YEARCHAMPION (RECORD)HEAD COACHSCORERUNNER-UPSITE
2021Baylor (28-2)Scott Drew86-70GonzagaIndianapolis, Ind.
2020Canceled (COVID-19)N/AN/AN/AAtlanta, Ga.
2019Virginia (35-3)Tony Bennett85-77 (OT)Texas TechMinneapolis, Minn.
2018Villanova (36-4)Jay Wright79-62MichiganSan Antonio, Tex.
2017North Carolina (33-7)Roy Williams71-65GonzagaPhoenix, Ariz.
2016Villanova (35-5)Jay Wright77-74North CarolinaHouston, Texas
2015Duke (35-4)Mike Krzyzewski68-63WisconsinIndianapolis, Ind.
2014Connecticut (32-8)Kevin Ollie60-54KentuckyArlington, Texas
2013Louisville (35-5)*Rick Pitino82-76MichiganAtlanta, Ga.
2012Kentucky (38-2)John Calipari67-59KansasNew Orleans, La.
2011Connecticut (32-9)Jim Calhoun53-41ButlerHouston, Texas
2010Duke (35-5)Mike Krzyzewski61-59ButlerIndianapolis, Ind.
2009North Carolina (34-4)Roy Williams89-72Michigan StateDetroit, Mich.
2008Kansas (37-3)Bill Self75-68 (OT)MemphisSan Antonio, Texas
2007Florida (35-5)Billy Donovan84-75Ohio StateAtlanta, Ga.
2006Florida (33-6)Billy Donovan73-57UCLAIndianapolis, Ind.
2005North Carolina (33-4)Roy Williams75-70IllinoisSt. Louis, Mo.
2004Connecticut (33-6)Jim Calhoun82-73Georgia TechSan Antonio, Texas
2003Syracuse (30-5)Jim Boeheim81-78KansasNew Orleans, La.
2002Maryland (32-4)Gary Williams64-52IndianaAtlanta, Ga.
2001Duke (35-4)Mike Krzyzewski82-72ArizonaMinneapolis, Minn.
2000Michigan State (32-7)Tom Izzo89-76FloridaIndianapolis, Ind.
1999Connecticut (34-2)Jim Calhoun77-74DukeSt. Petersburg, Fla.
1998Kentucky (35-4)Tubby Smith78-69UtahSan Antonio, Texas
1997Arizona (25-9)Lute Olson84-79 (OT)KentuckyIndianapolis, Ind.
1996Kentucky (34-2)Rick Pitino76-67SyracuseEast Rutherford, N.J.
1995UCLA (31-2)Jim Harrick89-78ArkansasSeattle, Wash.
1994Arkansas (31-3)Nolan Richardson76-72DukeCharlotte, N.C.
1993North Carolina (34-4)Dean Smith77-71MichiganNew Orleans, La.
1992Duke (34-2)Mike Krzyzewski71-51MichiganMinneapolis, Minn.
1991Duke (32-7)Mike Krzyzewski72-65KansasIndianapolis, Ind.
1990UNLV (35-5)Jerry Tarkanian103-73DukeDenver, Colo.
1989Michigan (30-7)Steve Fisher80-79 (OT)Seton HallSeattle, Wash.
1988Kansas (27-11)Larry Brown83-79OklahomaKansas City, Mo.
1987Indiana (30-4)Bob Knight74-73SyracuseNew Orleans, La.
1986Louisville (32-7)Denny Crum72-69DukeDallas, Texas
1985Villanova (25-10)Rollie Massimino66-64GeorgetownLexington, Ky,
1984Georgetown (34-3)John Thompson84-75HoustonSeattle, Wash.
1983North Carolina State (26-10)Jim Valvano54-52HoustonAlbuquerque, N.M.
1982North Carolina (32-2)Dean Smith63-62GeorgetownNew Orleans, La.
1981Indiana (26-9)Bob Knight63-50North CarolinaPhiladelphia, Pa.
1980Louisville (33-3)Denny Crum59-54UCLAIndianapolis, Ind.
1979Michigan State (26-6)Jud Heathcote75-64Indiana StateSalt Lake City, Utah
1978Kentucky (30-2)Joe Hall94-88DukeSt. Louis, Mo.
1977Marquette (25-7)Al McGuire67-59North CarolinaAtlanta, Ga.
1976Indiana (32-0)Bob Knight86-68MichiganPhiladelphia, Pa.
1975UCLA (28-3)John Wooden92-85KentuckySan Diego, Calif.
1974North Carolina State (30-1)Norm Sloan76-64MarquetteGreensboro, N.C.
1973UCLA (30-0)John Wooden87-66Memphis StateSt. Louis, Mo.
1972UCLA (30-0)John Wooden81-76Florida StateLos Angeles, Calif.
1971UCLA (29-1)John Wooden68-62VillanovaHouston, Texas
1970UCLA (28-2)John Wooden80-69JacksonvilleCollege Park, Md.
1969UCLA (29-1)John Wooden92-72PurdueLouisville, Ky.
1968UCLA (29-1)John Wooden78-55North CarolinaLos Angeles, Calif.
1967UCLA (30-0)John Wooden79-64DaytonLouisville, Ky.
1966UTEP (28-1)Don Haskins72-65KentuckyCollege Park, Md.
1965UCLA (28-2)John Wooden91-80MichiganPortland, Ore.
1964UCLA (30-0)John Wooden98-83DukeKansas City, Mo.
1963Loyola (Ill.) (29-2)George Ireland60-58 (OT)CincinnatiLouisville, Ky.
1962Cincinnati (29-2)Ed Jucker71-59Ohio StateLouisville, Ky.
1961Cincinnati (27-3)Ed Jucker70-65 (OT)Ohio StateKansas City, Mo.
1960Ohio State (25-3)Fred Taylor75-55CaliforniaDaly City, Calif.
1959California (25-4)Pete Newell71-70West VirginiaLouisville, Ky.
1958Kentucky (23-6)Adolph Rupp84-72SeattleLouisville, Ky.
1957North Carolina (32-0)Frank McGuire54-53 (3OT)KansasKansas City, Mo.
1956San Francisco (29-0)Phil Woolpert83-71IowaEvanston, Ill.
1955San Francisco (28-1)Phil Woolpert77-63LaSalleKansas City, Mo.
1954La Salle (26-4)Ken Loeffler92-76BradleyKansas City, Mo.
1953Indiana (23-3)Branch McCracken69-68KansasKansas City, Mo.
1952Kansas (28-3)Phog Allen80-63St. John'sSeattle, Wash.
1951Kentucky (32-2)Adolph Rupp68-58Kansas StateMinneapolis, Minn.
1950CCNY (24-5)Nat Holman71-68BradleyNew York, N.Y.
1949Kentucky (32-2)Adolph Rupp46-36Oklahoma A&MSeattle, Wash.
1948Kentucky (36-3)Adolph Rupp58-42BaylorNew York, N.Y.
1947Holy Cross (27-3)Doggie Julian58-47OklahomaNew York, N.Y.
1946Oklahoma State (31-2)Henry Iba43-40North CarolinaNew York, N.Y.
1945Oklahoma State (27-4)Henry Iba49-45NYUNew York, N.Y.
1944Utah (21-4)Vadal Peterson42-40 (OT)DartmouthNew York, N.Y.
1943Wyoming (31-2)Everett Shelton46-34GeorgetownNew York, N.Y.
1942Stanford (28-4)Everett Dean53-38DartmouthKansas City, Mo.
1941Wisconsin (20-3)Bud Foster39-34Washington StateKansas City, Mo.
1940Indiana (20-3)Branch McCracken60-42KansasKansas City, Mo.
1939Oregon (29-5)Howard Hobson46-33Ohio StateEvanston, Ill.

*Louisville’s participation in the 2013 tournament was later vacated by the Committee on Infractions.

Sours: https://www.ncaa.com/news/basketball-men/mml-official-bracket/ncaa-bracket-printable-march-madness-bracket-pdf
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NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament

"NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament" redirects here. For other division tournaments, see NCAA basketball tournament.

"March Madness" redirects here. For other uses, see March Madness (disambiguation).

"NCAA March Madness" redirects here. For CBS & Turner Sports' coverage of the tournament, see NCAA March Madness (TV program).

United States top collegiate-level basketball tournament

The NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament, also known and branded as NCAA March Madness, is a single-elimination tournament played each spring in the United States, currently featuring 68 college basketball teams from the Division I level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), to determine the national championship. The tournament was created in 1939 by the National Association of Basketball Coaches, and was the idea of Ohio State coach Harold Olsen.[1] Played mostly during March, it has become one of the most famous annual sporting events in the United States.[citation needed]

It has become extremely common in popular culture to predict the outcomes of each game, even among non-sports fans; it is estimated that tens of millions of Americans participate in a bracket pool contest every year. Mainstream media outlets such as ESPN, CBS Sports and Fox Sports host tournaments online where contestants can enter for free. Also, there are many sites that cater to corporate marketing and public relations to get in on the excitement such as BigTourney.com.[2] Employers have also noticed a change in the behavior of employees during this time: they have seen an increase in the number of sick days used, extended lunch breaks and even the rescheduling of conference calls to allow for more tournament watching.[3] There are also many handicappers and pundits which offer advice for winning their own bracket.[4][5]

The tournament teams include champions from 32 Division I conferences (which receive automatic bids), and 36 teams which are awarded at-large berths. These "at-large" teams are chosen by an NCAA selection committee, then announced in a nationally televised event on the Sunday and dubbed Selection Sunday. The 68 teams are divided into four regions and organized into a single-elimination "bracket", which pre-determines, when a team wins a game, which team it will face next. Each team is "seeded", or ranked, within its region from 1 to 16. After the First Four round, the tournament occurs during the course of three weekends, at pre-selected neutral sites across the United States. Teams, seeded by rank, proceed through a single-game elimination bracket beginning with the First Four round, a first round consisting of 64 teams playing in 32 games over the course of a week, the "Sweet Sixteen" and "Elite Eight" rounds the next week and weekend, respectively, and – for the last weekend of the tournament – the "Final Four" round. The Final Four is usually played during the first weekend of April. These four teams, one from each region (East, South, Midwest, and West), compete in a preselected location for the national championship.

The tournament has been at least partially televised on network television since 1969.[6] Currently, the games are broadcast by CBS, TBS, TNT, and truTV under the trade name NCAA March Madness. These networks paid the NCAA to broadcast the games in 2011. The contract was for 14 years and they paid $10.8 billion. However, in 2018 that contract was extended for another seven years making it valid through the year 2032. The average payment over the years comes out to be $891 million annually.[7] Since 2011, all games are available for viewing nationwide and internationally. As television coverage has grown, so too has the tournament's popularity. Currently, millions of Americans fill out a bracket,[8] attempting to correctly predict the outcome of 63 games of the tournament (not including the First Four games).

With 11 national titles, UCLA has the record for the most NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championships; John Wooden coached UCLA to 10 of its 11 titles. The University of Kentucky (UK) is second, with eight national titles. The University of North Carolina is third, with six national titles, and Duke University and Indiana University are tied for fourth with five national titles. The University of Connecticut (UConn) is sixth with four national titles. The University of Kansas (KU) & Villanova University are tied for seventh with three national titles. The University of Cincinnati, the University of Florida, University of Louisville,[a] Michigan State University, North Carolina State, Oklahoma State, and the University of San Francisco all have two national titles. The tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985, 65 in 2001, and 68 in 2011.

Both 2020 men's and women's tournaments were cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[9] The 2021 tournament was subsequently played at various venues in Indiana, the first time that a tournament has been hosted in its entirety by one state.

Current tournament format[edit]

A ticket from the 1988 tournament held in Kansas City, Missouri

The NCAA has changed the tournament format several times since its inception, most often being an increase of the number of teams. This section describes the tournament as it has operated since 2011.

Qualifying[edit]

A total of 68 teams qualify for the tournament played during March and April. Thirty-two teams earn automatic bids as their respective conference champions. All 32 Division I "all-sports" conferences (defined as those that sponsor men's and women's basketball) currently hold championship tournaments to determine which team receives the automatic qualification. The Ivy League was the last Division I conference to not conduct a tournament; through the 2015–16 season, it awarded its tournament berth to the regular-season champion. If two or more Ivies shared a regular-season championship, playoffs were used to decide the tournament participant. Since 2017, the league conducts their own postseason tournament.[10]

The remaining 36 tournament slots are granted to at-large bids, which are determined by the Selection Committee in a nationally televised event on the Sunday, dubbed Selection Sunday by the media and fans, by a group primarily of conference commissioners and school athletic directors who are appointed into service by the NCAA. The committee also determines where all sixty-eight teams are seeded and placed in the bracket.

Regions[edit]

The tournament is divided into four regions and each region has at least sixteen teams. Regions that do not include First Four games have exactly sixteen teams. The committee is charged with making each of the four regions as close as possible in overall quality of teams from wherever they come from.

The names of the regions vary from year to year, and are broadly geographic (such as "East", "South", "Midwest" & "West"). From 1957 to 1984, the "Mideast", roughly corresponding to the Southeastern region of the United States, designation was used. From 1985 to 1997, the Mideast region was known as "Southeast" and again changed to "South" starting from 1998. The selected names roughly correspond to the location of the four cities hosting the regional finals. From 2004 to 2006, the regions were named after their host cities, e.g. the Phoenix Regional in 2004, the Chicago Regional in 2005, and the Minneapolis Regional in 2006, but reverted to the traditional geographic designations beginning in 2007. For example, during 2012, the regions were named South (Atlanta, Georgia), East (Boston, Massachusetts), Midwest (St. Louis, Missouri), and West (Phoenix, Arizona).[11]

Seeding and bracket[edit]

Further information: NCAA basketball tournament selection process

The selection committee ranks the whole field of 68 teams from 1 to 68. (It did not make this information public until 2012.) The committee then divides the teams amongst the regions. The top four teams will be distributed among the four regions, and each will receive a No. 1 seed within that region. The next four ranked teams will then be distributed among the four regions, each receiving a No. 2 seed in their region, and the process continues down the line, with some exceptions (as is explained below). Thus, each region seeds from No. 1 to No. 16. There are four seeds that are "doubled up" and populated by the winners of the First Four games. As can be seen below, the actual seeding depends on (among other factors) the rankings of the eight teams that the committee selects for the First Four opening round (see the next paragraph and the First Four section below).

The selection committee is also instructed to place teams so that whenever possible, teams from the same conference cannot meet until the regional finals. Additionally, it is also instructed to avoid any possible rematches of regular-season or previous year's tournament games during the First and Second rounds.[12] Further restrictions are listed in the Venues section below. To comply with these other requirements, the selection committee may move one or several teams up or down one seed from their respective original seed line.[12] Thus, for example, the 40th overall ranked team, originally slated to be a No. 10 seed within a particular region, may instead be moved up to a No. 9 seed or moved down to a No. 11 seed. In addition, the rankings of the eight teams selected for the First Four round will likewise affect the final seedlings.

The bracket is thus established, and during the semifinals, the champion of the top-ranked number 1 seed's region will play against the champion of the fourth-ranked number 1 seed's region, and the champion of the second-ranked number 1 seed's region will play against the champion of the third-ranked number 1 seed's region.[12]

Venues[edit]

In the men's tournament, all sites are nominally neutral; teams are prohibited from playing tournament games on their home courts prior to the Final Four (though in some cases, a team may be fortunate enough to play in or near its home state or city). By current NCAA rules, any court on which a team hosts more than three regular-season games (in other words, not including conference tournament games) is considered a "home court".[13] The exception to this rule is the University of Dayton, which would be allowed to play a game in the First Four round in their home arena[14] as they did in 2015.

However, while a team can be moved to a different region if its home court is being used during any of the first two weeks of the tournament, the Final Four venue is determined years in advance, and cannot be changed regardless of participants. For this reason a team could potentially play in a Final Four on its home court, though this is unlikely, since the Final Four is staged at venues larger than most college basketball arenas. (The most recent team to play the Final Four in its home city was Butler during 2010; its home court then seated only 10,000, as opposed to the 70,000-plus capacity of Lucas Oil Stadium, the Final Four venue.)

Rounds[edit]

The tournament consists of several rounds. They are currently named, in order of first to last:

  • The First Four
  • The First Round (the Round of 64)
  • The Second Round (the Round of 32)
  • The Regional Semi-finals (participating teams are known popularly as the "Sweet Sixteen")
  • The Regional Finals (participating teams are known commonly as the "Elite Eight")
  • The National Semi-finals (participating teams are referred to officially as the "Final Four")
  • The National Championship

The tournament is single-elimination, which increases the chance of an underdog and lower-seeded "Cinderella team" advancing to subsequent rounds. Although these lower-ranked teams are forced to play stronger teams, they need only one win to advance (instead of needing to win a majority of games in a series, as in professional basketball).

First Four[edit]

Main article: First Four

The University of Dayton Arena, which has hosted all First Four games since the round's inception in 2011 (except 2021), as well as its precursor, the single "play-in" gameheld from 2001 to 2010. As of 2019, the arena has hosted 123 tournament games, the most of any venue.

First held during 2011, the First Four are games between the four lowest-ranked at-large teams and the four lowest-ranked automatic-bid (conference-champion) teams.

First Four At-large seeds
Note: Each year, the four lowest-ranked automatic-bid teams compete as No. 16 seeds, while the four lowest-ranked at-large teams compete as higher seeds. From 2011 through 2014, the at-large teams competed in the First Four round as No. 11, 12, 13, or 14 seeds. The table below shows the years in which at-large teams competed as each of those four seeds. From 2015 through 2021, the at-large teams competed in the First Four round as No. 11 seeds.
Seed Count Years
11 3 2011, 2013, 2014
12 3 2011, 2012, 2014
13 1 2013
14 1 2012

First and Second Rounds[edit]

During the First Round (the Round of 64), the No. 1 seed plays the No. 16 seed in all regions; the No. 2 team plays the No. 15, and so on. The effect of this seeding structure ensures that the better a team is ranked (and therefore seeded), the worse-ranked (and presumably weaker) their opponents will be. Sixteen first-round games are played on the Thursday following the First Four round. The remaining sixteen first-round games are played Friday. (In 2021 the First Four was played on a Thursday and the First Round on the following Friday and Saturday.) At this point the tournament is reduced to 32 teams.

The Second Round (the Round of 32) is played on Saturday and Sunday immediately after the first round. (In 2021 the Round of 32 was played on the Sunday and Monday immediately following the First Round.) The Second Round consists of Thursday's winners playing in eight games on Saturday, followed by Friday's winners playing in the remaining eight Second Round games on Sunday. Thus, after the first weekend, 16 teams remain, commonly known as the "Sweet Sixteen."

Unlike hockey, teams are not re-seeded in such a manner where the highest remaining seed in each region would always play the lowest-ranked remaining seed. Instead, the brackets for the first four rounds are arranged so as to match the highest possible remaining seed from each round against the winner of the game involving the lowest possible "highest" seed from the previous round. Thus, for the second round, the winner of the 1 vs 16 game plays the winner of the 8 vs 9 game, the winner of the 2 vs 15 game plays the winner of the 7 vs 10 game, and so on.

Regional semifinals and finals[edit]

The teams that are still competing after the first weekend advance to the regional semifinals (the Sweet Sixteen) and finals (the Elite Eight), which are played during the second weekend of the tournament (again, the games are split into Thursday/Saturday and Friday/Sunday). Four regional semi-final games are played Thursday and four are played Friday. After Friday's games, 8 teams (the Elite Eight) remain. Saturday features two regional final games matching Thursday's winners and Sunday's two final games match Friday's winners. After the second weekend of the tournament, the four regional champions are the "Final Four."

Final Four[edit]

Main article: NCAA Men's Division I Final Four appearances by school

For a list of teams advanced to Final Four, see List of NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament Final Four participants.

The winners of each region advance to the Final Four, where the national semifinals are played on Saturday and the national championship is played on Monday. As is noted above, which regional champion will play which, and in which semifinal they play, is determined by the overall rankings of the four No. 1 seeds in the original bracket, not on the ranks of the eventual Final Four teams themselves.

Winners[edit]

Titles by year[edit]

Main article: List of NCAA Division I men's basketball champions

Titles by school[edit]

NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament is located in the United States
UCLA

UCLA

Kentucky

Kentucky

North Carolina

North
Carolina

Duke

Duke

Indiana

Indiana

UConn

UConn

Kansas

Kansas

Louisville

Louisville

USF

USF

Villanova

Villanova

Florida

Florida

NC State

NC State

Oklahoma State

Oklahoma State

Cincinnati

Cincinnati

Michigan State

Michigan State

Arkansas

Arkansas

Holy Cross

Holy
Cross

La Salle

La Salle

Loyola

Loyola

Marquette

Marquette

UTEP

UTEP

Arizona

Arizona

UNLV

UNLV

Stanford

Stanford

California

California

Georgetown

Georgetown

Maryland

Maryland

Ohio State

Ohio State

Utah

Utah

CCNY

CCNY

Wyoming

Wyoming

Michigan

Michigan

Syracuse

Syracuse

Wisconsin

Wisconsin

Oregon

Oregon

Virginia

Virginia

Baylor

Baylor

Schools that have won the NCAA Championship
Gold pog.svg– 11 championships, Purple pog.svg– 8 championships, Blue pog.svg– 6 championships, Red pog.svg– 5 championships, Green pog.svg– 4 championships, Pink pog.svg– 3 championships, Black pog.svg– 2 championships, White pog.svg– 1 championship
The following is a list of all schools that have won at least one NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament, along with the year(s) in which they won their championship(s).

For non-NCAA championships claimed by schools, see National Invitation Tournament, Helms Athletic Foundation, and Mythical national championship.

School Titles Years
UCLA11 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1995
Kentucky8 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1996, 1998, 2012
North Carolina6 1957, 1982, 1993, 2005, 2009, 2017
Duke5 1991, 1992, 2001, 2010, 2015
Indiana5 1940, 1953, 1976, 1981, 1987
UConn4 1999, 2004, 2011, 2014
Kansas3 1952, 1988, 2008
Villanova3 1985, 2016, 2018
Cincinnati2 1961, 1962
Florida2 2006, 2007
Louisville2* 1980, 1986, 2013*
Michigan State2 1979, 2000
NC State2 1974, 1983
Oklahoma State2 1945, 1946
San Francisco2 1955, 1956
Arizona1 1997
Arkansas1 1994
Baylor1 2021
California1 1959
CCNY1 1950
Georgetown1 1984
Holy Cross1 1947
La Salle1 1954
Loyola–Chicago1 1963
Marquette1 1977
Maryland1 2002
Michigan1 1989
Ohio State1 1960
Oregon1 1939
UNLV1 1990
Stanford1 1942
Syracuse1 2003
UTEP1 1966
Utah1 1944
Virginia1 2019
Wisconsin1 1941
Wyoming1 1943

* 2013 title vacated by NCAA.

Tournament history[edit]

Mid-major teams[edit]

Mid-major teams—which are defined as teams from the America East Conference (America East), ASUN Conference (ASUN), Atlantic 10 (A-10), Big Sky Conference (Big Sky), Big South Conference (Big South), Big West Conference (Big West), Colonial Athletic Conference (CAA), Conference USA (C-USA), Horizon League (Horizon), Ivy League (Ivy), Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC), Mid-American Conference (MAC), Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC), Missouri Valley Conference (MVC), Mountain West Conference (MW), Northeast Conference (NEC), Ohio Valley Conference (OVC), Patriot League (Patriot), Southern Conference (SoCon), Southland Conference (Southland), Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC), Summit League (Summit), Sun Belt Conference (Sun Belt), West Coast Conference (WCC), and the Western Athletic Conference (WAC)—have experienced success in the tournament at various times.[15]

The last time, as of 2021, a mid-major team won the National Championship was 1990 when UNLV won with a 103–73 win over Duke, since UNLV was then a member of the Big West and since 1999 has been a member of the MW; the Big West was not then considered a power conference, nor is the MW today. However, during the tenure of UNLV's coach at the time, Jerry Tarkanian, the Runnin' Rebels were widely viewed as a major program despite their conference affiliation (a situation similar to that of Gonzaga since the first years of the 21st century). Additionally, the Big West received three bids in the 1990 tournament. The last time, as of 2021, an independent mid-major team won the National Championship was 1977 when Marquette won 67–59 over North Carolina. However, Marquette was not considered a "mid-major" program at that time. The very term "mid-major" was not coined until 1977, and did not see wide use until the 1990s. More significantly, Marquette was one of several traditional basketball powers that were still NCAA Division I independents in the late 1970s. Also, Marquette has been a member of widely acknowledged "major" basketball conferences since 1991, and is currently in the undeniably major Big East Conference. The last time, as of 2021, a mid-major team from a small media market (defined as a market out of the top 25 television markets in the United States in 2019) won the National Championship was arguably 1962 when Cincinnati, then in the MVC, won 71–59 over Ohio State of the Big Ten, since Cincinnati's TV market is listed 35th in the nation as of 2021. However, the MVC was generally seen in that day as a major basketball conference.

The last time the Final Four was composed, as of 2021, of at least 75% mid-major teams (3/4), i.e. excluding all present-day major conferences or their predecessors, was 1979, where Indiana State, then as now of the Missouri Valley Conference (which had lost several of its most prominent programs, among them Cincinnati, earlier in the decade); Penn, then as now in the Ivy League; and DePaul, then an independent, participated in the Final Four, only to see Indiana State lose to Michigan State. The last time, as of 2021, the Final Four has been composed of at least 50% mid-major teams (2/4) was 2011, when VCU, then of the Colonial Athletic Association, and Butler, then of the Horizon League, participated in the Final Four, only to see Butler lose to Connecticut. Three of the four most recent Final Fours have involved a single "mid-major" team by the definition used here—the 2017, 2018, and 2021 tournaments, with Gonzaga appearing in both 2017 and 2021 and Loyola–Chicago appearing in 2018 (although by 2017 Gonzaga, which has appeared in every NCAA tournament in the 21st century, was generally considered a major program despite its membership in the mid-major WCC[b]). To date, as of 2021, no Final Four has been composed of 100% mid-major teams (4/4), therefore guaranteeing a mid-major team winning the National Championship.

Arguably the tournament with the most mid-major success was the 1970 tournament, where the Sweet Sixteen, Elite Eight, Final Four, and National Championship Game had 63% representation of mid-major teams in the Sweet 16 (10/16), 75% representation in the Elite 8 (6/8), 75% representation in the Final 4 (3/4), and 50% representation in the National Championship Game (1/2). Jacksonville lost to UCLA in the National Championship, with New Mexico State defeating St. Bonaventure for third place.

Below is a table that shows the performance of mid-major teams from the Sweet Sixteen round to the National Championship Game from 1939—the tournament's first year—to the present day.

Notes
  • The first column is a list of every mid-major conference. For the conferences that have predecessor names, a footnote (below the table) lists those names and years. Opposite each conference's name are the schools that have appeared in the tournament from the Sweet Sixteen onwards when the school was a member of the conference or a predecessor conference.
  • Some of the conferences that are now considered mid-majors were regarded as major conferences in the past. For example:
    • The Missouri Valley Conference was considered a major basketball conference until many of its most prominent members left in the mid-1970s (before Indiana State's 1979 run to the title game).
    • Conference USA was considered a major conference at its formation in 1995. It arguably became a mid-major in 2005, when several of its more prominent teams left for the Big East Conference, and unquestionably became a mid-major during the early-2010s realignment cycle.
    • The WAC was considered a major conference until 1999, when 8 of its 16 members left to form the Mountain West Conference.
    • The MW was considered a major basketball conference until 2011, when two of its most prominent basketball programs (BYU and Utah) left for other conferences (West Coast Conference and Pac-12, respectively).
  • As alluded to above, certain programs that were members of "mid-major" conferences during deep tournament runs are nonetheless widely viewed as having been major programs at that time. The same applies to many programs that were independent before the 1980s. Examples include (but are not limited to) San Francisco in the 1950s, Marquette in the 1970s, UNLV in the last part of the 20th century, and Gonzaga today.
Mid-Major ConferenceSweet SixteenElite EightFinal FourChampionship GameNational Champion
America East[nb 1]
ASUN[nb 2]Florida Gulf Coast (2013)
Big SkyWeber State (1969, 1972), Montana (1975), Idaho (1982)Idaho State (1977)
Big South
Big West[nb 3]Long Beach State (1973), UNLV (1975, 1976, 1984, 1986), Fresno State (1982), New Mexico State (1992)Long Beach State (1972), Cal State Fullerton (1978), UNLV (1989)UNLV (1977, 1987, 1991)UNLV (1990)
CAA[nb 4]Richmond (1988)Navy (1986)George Mason (2006), VCU (2011)
C-USALouisville (1996), Cincinnati (2001), UAB (2004), Memphis (2009)Cincinnati (1996), Louisville (1997), Memphis (2006, 2007)Marquette (2003), Louisville (2005)Memphis (2008[nb 5])
Horizon[nb 6]Loyola (Chicago) (1985), Xavier (1990), Butler (2003, 2007), Milwaukee (2005)Butler (2010, 2011)
IvyPrinceton (1967), Columbia (1968), Cornell (2010)Dartmouth (1958)Princeton (1965), Penn (1979)
MAAC
MACBowling Green (1963), Central Michigan (1975), Western Michigan (1976), Toledo (1979), Ball State (1990), Eastern Michigan (1991), Miami (Ohio) (1999), Ohio (2012)Ohio (1964), Kent State (2002)
MEAC
MVCSaint Louis (1957), Cincinnati (1958, 1966), Creighton (1962, 1964, 1974), Tulsa (1994, 1995), Southwest Missouri State (1999), Southern Illinois (1977, 2002, 2007), Wichita State (2006, 2015), Bradley (2006), Northern Iowa (2010), Loyola–Chicago (2021)Creighton (1941), Saint Louis (1952), Bradley (1955), Wichita State (1964, 1981), Drake (1970, 1971)Oklahoma A&M (1949), Cincinnati (1960), Wichita State (1965, 2013), Drake (1969), Loyola–Chicago (2018)Bradley (1950, 1954), Cincinnati (1963), Indiana State (1979)Oklahoma A&M (1945, 1946), Cincinnati (1961, 1962)
MWUtah (2005), UNLV (2007), BYU (2011), San Diego State (2011, 2014), Nevada (2018)
NEC[nb 7]
OVCMorehead State (1961), Austin Peay (1973)
Patriot[nb 8]
SoConEast Tennessee State (1968), Furman (1974), VMI (1977), Chattanooga (1997)VMI (1976), Davidson (1968, 1969, 2008)
SouthlandLamar (1980), Louisiana Tech (1985)
SWAC
Summit[nb 9]Cleveland State (1986), Valparaiso (1998), Oral Roberts (2021)
Sun BeltWestern Kentucky (1993, 2008)UAB (1982)UNC Charlotte (1977)
WCC[nb 10]Santa Clara (1970), Pacific (1971), Pepperdine (1976), San Francisco (1979), Gonzaga (2000, 2001, 2006, 2009, 2016, 2018), St. Mary's (California) (2010)St. Mary's (California) (1959), Pacific (1967), Santa Clara (1969), San Francisco (1974), Loyola Marymount (1990), Gonzaga (1999, 2015, 2019)Santa Clara (1952), San Francisco (1957)Gonzaga (2017, 2021)San Francisco (1955, 1956)
WACColorado State (1969), New Mexico (1974), Wyoming (1987), Utah (1991, 1996), UTEP (1992), Nevada (2004)BYU (1981), Utah (1997), Tulsa (2000)Utah (1966)Utah (1998)Texas Western (1966)
  1. ^Known as the Eastern College Athletic Conference-North from 1979 to 1988 and the North Atlantic Conference from 1988 to 1996.
  2. ^Known as the Trans America Athletic Conference (TAAC) from 1978 to 2001 and as the Atlantic Sun Conference from 2001 to 2015.
  3. ^Known as the Pacific Coast Athletic Association (PCAA) from 1969 to 1988.
  4. ^Known as the Eastern College Athletic Conference-South from 1979 to 1985.
  5. ^Vacated due to academic ineligibility and impermissible benefits given to Derrick Rose
  6. ^Known as the Midwestern City Conference from 1979 to 1985 and the Midwestern Collegiate Conference from 1985 to 2001.
  7. ^Known as the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference Metro from 1979 to 1988.
  8. ^Known as the Colonial League from 1986 to 1990, a period in which it was a football-only conference.
  9. ^Known as the Association of Mid-Continent Universities from 1982 to 1989 and the Mid-Continent Conference (MCC) until 2007.
  10. ^Known as the California Basketball Association from 1952 to 1956 and the West Coast Athletic Conference (WCAC) from 1956 to 1989.

Defunct conferences and independents[edit]

This table shows teams that saw success in the tournament from now-defunct conferences or were independents.

One conference listed here, the Southwest Conference, was universally considered a major conference throughout its history. Of its final eight members, five are now in conferences typically considered "major" in basketball—three in the Big 12, one in the SEC, and one in The American. Another member that left during the SWC's last decade is now in the SEC. The Metro Conference, which operated from 1975 to 1995, is not listed here because it was considered a major basketball conference throughout its history. Most notably, Louisville, which was a member for the league's entire existence, won both of its NCAA-recognized titles (1980, 1986) while in the Metro. It was one of the two leagues that merged to form today's Conference USA. The other league involved in the merger, the Great Midwest Conference, was arguably a major conference; it was formed in 1990, with play starting in 1991, when several of the Metro's strongest basketball programs left that league.

Mid-Major ConferenceSweet SixteenElite EightFinal FourChampionship GameNational Champion
Border Intercollegiate Athletic Conference[nb 1]New Mexico State (1952)Arizona State (1961)
East Coast Conference[nb 2]Saint Joseph's (1981)
Eastern Intercollegiate Basketball League[nb 3]Dartmouth (1941)Dartmouth (1942, 1944)
Great Midwest Conference[nb 4]Marquette (1994), Memphis (1995)Memphis State (1992), Cincinnati (1993)Cincinnati (1992)
Metropolitan New York Conference[nb 5]NYU (1943, 1946, 1951, 1962, 1963), Manhattan (1958)City College of New York (1947)NYU (1960)NYU (1952)City College of New York (1950)
Middle Atlantic Conference[nb 6]Saint Joseph's (1959, 1960, 1962, 1965, 1966)Saint Joseph's (1963)Saint Joseph's (1961)
Mountain States Conference[nb 7]BYU (1950, 1951, 1957)Wyoming (1941)Utah State (1939)Wyoming (1943)
New Jersey-New York 7 Conference[nb 8]St. John's (1979)
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association[nb 9]Western Kentucky (1940)
Southwest Conference[nb 10]Texas A&M (1956, 1969, 1980)Texas (1939, 1943, 1947, 1990), Rice (1940, 1942)Texas (1943, 1947)Houston (1983, 1984)
Western New York Little Three Conference[nb 11]Canisius (1957)Canisius (1955, 1956)
Yankee Conference[nb 12]UConn (1956, 1976)UConn (1964)
IndependentsMontana State (1951), Dayton (1952, 1965, 1966, 1974), DePaul (1953, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1976, 1984, 1986[nb 13], 1987[nb 13]), Seattle (1953, 1955, 1956, 1964), Butler (1962), Utah State (1962, 1964), St. Bonaventure (1968), Niagara (1970), Cincinnati (1975), Detroit (1977)Brown (1939), Springfield (1940), Oklahoma City (1957), Boston University (1959), Utah State (1970), DePaul (1978), Dayton (1984)Duquesne (1940), DePaul (1943, 1979), Bradley (1955), New Mexico State (1970), St. Bonaventure (1970), Rutgers (1976)Bradley (1954), La Salle (1955), Seattle (1958), Dayton (1967), Jacksonville (1970)Utah (1944), Holy Cross (1947), La Salle (1954), Loyola (Chicago) (1963), Texas Western (1966), Marquette (1977)
  1. ^Established in 1931 and dissolved in 1962.
  2. ^Established in 1958 and dissolved in 1994.
  3. ^Established in 1901 and dissolved in 1955, though claimed by the Ivy League as a part of its own history.
  4. ^Established in 1990 and merged into Conference USA in 1995.
  5. ^Established in 1933 and dissolved in 1963.
  6. ^Established in 1912 and became a Division III conference after 1974.
  7. ^Established in 1938 and known as the Skyline Conference from 1951 to 1962 before the conference dissolved in early 1962.
  8. ^Established in 1976 and dissolved in 1979.
  9. ^Established in 1894 and dissolved in 1942.
  10. ^Established in 1914 and dissolved in 1996.
  11. ^Established in 1946 and dissolved in 1958.
  12. ^Established in 1946 by former members of the New England Conference, which was founded in 1938 but never placed a team in the NCAA Tournament; became a football-only conference in 1976 and dissolved in 1997.
  13. ^ abVacated by the NCAA

Tournament appearances streaks[edit]

  • List of schools with the longest streaks of appearances in the NCAA tournament. Because no tournament was held in 2020, that year does not count as an interruption.
  • Bold Indicates an active current streak as of the 2021 tournament.
  1. ^Louisville won three tournaments on the court; however, the third title in 2013 was vacated by the NCAA due to sanctions stemming from a sex scandal that became public in 2015.
  2. ^In a 2019 story on the rise of Murray State point guard Ja Morant, veteran sportswriter Pat Forde argued that as early as 2006, Gonzaga was no longer a mid-major program. Forde stated that Morant could be the first "true mid-major" player to be selected in the top five of the NBA draft since 1998, specifically saying that 2006 third pick Adam Morrison was from "decided non-mid-major Gonzaga."[16]
  3. ^Two of Arizona's appearances in this period (1999, 2008) were later vacated due to NCAA sanctions.

Tournament droughts[edit]

  • List of schools with the longest time between NCAA tournament appearances (minimum 20-year drought).
  • Bold Indicates an active current streak as of the 2021 tournament:

As of 2021, four schools that were considered "major college" by the Associated Press when it published its first college basketball rankings in 1948, and have been continuously in the AP's "major" classification, have yet to reach the national tournament. While the NCAA did not split into divisions until 1956 (university and college), the AP has distinguished "major colleges" from "small colleges" throughout the history of its basketball rankings.

Evolution of the tournament[edit]

The NCAA tournament has changed its format many times over the years, many of which are listed below.

Expansion of field[edit]

The NCAA tournament field has expanded a number of times throughout its history.

YearsTeamsByesPlay-in
games
1939–19508
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NCAA_Division_I_Men%27s_Basketball_Tournament
2021 March Madness Best Moments - 2021 NCAA Tournament Highlights

2022 March Madness: Complete schedule, dates, TV times

First Four — Thursday, March 18(16) Texas Southern 60, (16) Mount St. Mary's 52Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall(11) Drake 53, (11) Wichita State 52Mackey Arena(16) Norfolk State 54, (16) Appalachian State 53 Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall(11) UCLA 86, (11) Michigan State 80Mackey ArenaFirst Round — Friday, March 19(7) Florida 75, (10) Virginia Tech 70 (OT)Hinkle Fieldhouse(3) Arkansas 85, (14) Colgate 68Bankers Life Fieldhouse(1) Illinois 78, (16) Drexel 49Indiana Farmers Coliseum(6) Texas Tech 65, (11) Utah State 53Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall(15) Oral Roberts 75, (2) Ohio State 72 (OT)Mackey Arena(1) Baylor 79, (16) Hartford 55Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)(8) Loyola Chicago 71, (9) Georgia Tech 60Hinkle Fieldhouse(12) Oregon State 70, (5) Tennessee 56Bankers Life Fiieldhouse(4) Oklahoma State 69, (13) Liberty 60Indiana Farmers Coliseum(9) Wisconsin 85, No. 8 North Carolina 62Mackey Arena(2) Houston 87, (15) Cleveland State 56Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall(13) North Texas 78, (4) Purdue 69 (OT)Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)(10) Rutgers 60, (7) Clemson 56Bankers Life Fieldhouse(11) Syracuse 78, (6) San Diego State 62Hinkle Fieldhouse(3) West Virginia 84, (14) Morehead State 67Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)(5) Villanova 73, (12) Winthrop 63Indiana Farmers ColiseumFirst Round — Saturday, March 20(5) Colorado 96, (12) Georgetown 73Hinkle Fieldhouse(4) Florida State 64, (13) UNC Greensboro 54Bankers Life Fieldhouse(3) Kansas 93, (14) Eastern Washington 84Indiana Farmers Coliseum(8) LSU 76, (9) St. Bonaventure 61Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall(1) Michigan 82, (16) Texas Southern 66Mackey Arena(5) Creighton 63, (12) UC Santa Barbara 62Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)(2) Alabama 68, (15) Iona 55Hinkle Fieldhouse(6) USC 72, (11) Drake 56Bankers Life Fieldhouse(2) Iowa 86, (15) Grand Canyon 74Indiana Farmers Coliseum(10) Maryland 63, (7) UConn 54Mackey Arena(13) Ohio 62, (4) Virginia 58Simon Skjodt Assembly Hall(8) Oklahoma 72, (9) Missouri 68Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)(1) Gonzaga 98, (16) Norfolk State 55Bankers Life Fieldhouse(11) UCLA 73, (6) BYU 62Hinkle Fieldhouse(14) Abilene Christian 53, (3) Texas 52Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)(7) Oregon vs. (10) VCU — NO-CONTEST DUE TO COVID-19 PROTOCOLS--Second Round — Sunday, March 21(8) Loyola Chicago 71, (1) Illinois 58Bankers Life Fieldhouse(1) Baylor 76, (9) Wisconsin 63Hinkle Fieldhouse(11) Syracuse 75, (3) West Virginia 72Bankers Life Fieldhouse(3) Arkansas 68, (6) Texas Tech 66Hinkle Fieldhouse(2) Houston 63, (10) Rutgers 60Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)(15) Oral Roberts 81, (7) Florida 78Indiana Farmers Coliseum(5) Villanova 84, (13) North Texas 61Bankers Life Fieldhouse(12) Oregon State 80, (4) Oklahoma State 70Hinkle FieldhouseSecond Round — Monday, March 22(7) Oregon 95, (2) Iowa 80Bankers Life Fieldhouse(1) Gonzaga 87, (8) Oklahoma 71Hinkle Fieldhouse(11) UCLA 67, (14) Abilene Christian 47Bankers Life Fieldhouse(5) Creighton 72, (13) Ohio 58Hinkle Fieldhouse(1) Michigan 86, (8) LSU 78Lucas Oil Stadium Unity (South)(4) Florida State 71, (5) Colorado 53Indiana Farmers Coliseum(2) Alabama 96, (10) Maryland 77Bankers Life Fieldhouse(6) USC 85, No. 3 Kansas 51Hinkle FieldhouseSweet 16 — Saturday, March 27(12) Oregon State 65, No. 8 Loyola Chicago 58Bankers Life Fieldhouse(1) Baylor 62, (5) Villanova 51Hinkle Fieldhouse(3) Arkansas 72, (15) Oral Roberts 70Bankers Life Fieldhouse(2) Houston 62, (11) Syracuse 46Hinkle FieldhouseSweet 16 — Sunday, March 28(1) Gonzaga 83, (5) Creighton 65Hinkle Fieldhouse(1) Michigan 76, (4) Florida State 58Bankers Life Fieldhouse(11) UCLA 88, (2) Alabama 78 (OT)Hinkle Fieldhouse(6) USC 82, (7) Oregon 68Bankers Life FieldhouseElite Eight — Monday, March 29(2) Houston 67, (12) Oregon State 61Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)(1) Baylor 81, (3) Arkansas 72Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (South)Elite Eight — Tuesday, March 30(1) Gonzaga 85, (6) USC 66Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (North)(11) UCLA 51, (1) Michigan 49Lucas Oil Stadium Equality (South)
Sours: https://www.ncaa.com/news/basketball-men/article/2022-march-madness-schedule

Bracket ncaam

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The Boy Who Broke the March Madness Bracket

To live a long time. I dont presume to point out the exact reason, whether my wifes jealousy towards her friend, or Romas attitude, or something else that I dont know about, but the fact remains. My birthday was approaching, the date was round, and although I am not a special fan of noisy parties, it was decided this time to celebrate the holiday on a grand scale.

Moreover, the gray everyday routine has firmly settled in our heads, and this was, at least some chance will dissipate.

Now discussing:

Drop of gel onto it and smeared her finger along the blunt end. Then she turned on the vibrator at the smallest stroke - such that just at the limit of sensitivity. - raised her knees and, holding her breath, touched the end of the plug to her lips; moving up and down, she opened them and slowly plunged.



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