Peak bagger

Peak bagger DEFAULT

Extracted from Hike Aid 16, dated January 2016
Note: In the event of a conflict between this web page and the Hike Aid, the Hike Aid takes precedence.

Introduction

Peak Bagger PatchesThe Peak Bagger Program is designed to stimulate a greater appreciation of the alpine wilderness, while persons experience the beauty, peace and majesty of the mountains. Each peak has been carefully selected so that a variety of locations may be reached on backpacking treks, without the use of mountaineering skills. The Peak Bagger Award is a cumulative award series that recognizes High Adventure achievement, and is shown on the front cover. While few people are privileged to make first ascents, it is possible to experience the thrill of standing on the windswept summit and carry the memory forever. Look upon the lush, flower-starred greenness of alpine meadows, the harsh purity of rocky landscapes above timberline, or the almost supernatural touch of alpenglow upon the peaks, and you will surely join the growing ranks of those who love the mountains.

Careful planning is a must before climbing each of the peaks listed here. Unit leadership must consult trail guides or booklets on the area and forest service and topographic maps, and seek information from fellow backpackers. Route descriptions and profiles for most of these peaks are to be found in the books listed in Reference Materials. Many sources of information should be used diligently to ensure the success of hiking and climbing experiences.

The Peak Bagger Program is graduated to fill the needs of all, from the relative novice to the experienced mountaineer. The Basic Award is easy enough for the newcomer who is ready and willing to put forth that extra effort required. But, even the Basic Award is more than just climbing five mountains. The groups of peaks are such that a Scout has the opportunity to enjoy various sections of the California wilderness as an Award is earned. It is also a learning experience, that is, learning the effects of high altitude, the need for carrying the ten essentials, and the rewards and sense of achievement from standing on a mountain top.

Once the Basic Peak Bagger has been earned, any peak in a higher group may be substituted for a peak requirement in a lower group, e.g., a Group F peak for a Group D peak. The list of qualifying peaks is considered sufficiently extensive that most Units should find it relatively easy to select mountains that satisfy their particular needs. For this reason, there should be no need for substitutes beyond the approved list. Substitutes may be granted only in unusual circumstances after a written request is submitted for consideration of the Greater Los Angeles Area Council High Adventure Team prior to climbing a peak.

There is no time limit for earning these awards. Therefore, it is essential that an accurate record be maintained to ensure that each participant receives proper credit. The Peak Bagger Award Record is suggested for this purpose. It is also to be used in applying for an award. Happy climbing, and remember -

"Nothing of worth or weight can be
achieved with half a mind, with a faint
heart, or with lame endeavor
" - Barrow

Specific Requirements

  1. Earn two weekend awards (as defined in Hike Aid 6, "High Adventure Awards Program"), before beginning to climb peaks that qualify for these awards.
  2. Plan and complete each trip conforming to the following:
    1. The trip (including the final ascent) must be distributed over two or more consecutive days with an overnight stay (trail or dispersed site camp preferred). For weekend trips, at least four scheduled backpack hours must be planned.
    2. The ascent to the summit must be as part of a trek from the designated trailhead or approach.
    3. On the final ascent, carry the Ten Essentials-Plus and other clothing and equipment appropriate to the conditions.
    4. Only one peak is allowed for a weekend outing. Two peaks are the maximum for credit on a week-long hike (seven days, six nights minimum duration).
  3. Awards are earned as follows:
    1. Basic - Climb 5 peaks, consisting of no more than two from any Group.
    2. 10 peak - Climb five additional peaks consisting of one each from Groups A, B, C and two from Group D.
    3. 15 peak - Climb five additional peaks consisting of two from Group C, two from Group D and one from Group E.
    4. Senior (20) - Climb five additional peaks consisting of two from Group D and three from Group E.
    5. Mountaineer (25) - Climb five additional peaks consisting of two from Group E and three from Group F.
    No peak may be climbed more than once for credit.
  4. Upon completion of the requirements for the Basic, 10-Peak, and 15-Peak Awards, submit the Award Record to the GLAAC Scout Shop to purchase them. The Senior and Mountaineer Awards require approval of a member of the High Adventure Team before purchase.
  5. Once the Mountaineer Award is earned, the process may be repeated to earn an additional set of awards.

"Climb the mountains and get their glad tidings" - John Muir

Rating System

Although people of varied capabilities will be using this guide, an attempt is made here to provide uniform ratings for the trips to the peaks. The rating system is based on two factors, (1) the approach, and (2) the class of climb. The "Rating" column for the Approved Peaks list shows a letter and number, for each peak.

Approach rating:
This considers the difficulty of the ascent and the time required.

"M" = an easy to moderate, two day trip.
"H" = a strenuous two, day trip.
"S" = a moderate to strenuous, three day trip.
"L" = a peak normally climbed as part of a week-long hike.

Class of Climb Rating:
The Sierra Club uses these classifications.

1 = A trail leads all the way to the summit. Almost any footgear could be used, but boots are recommended for more comfortable hiking.

2 = The final ascent (usually above your camp site) has no maintained trail; however, a "climber's route" may sometimes be followed. The terrain is rougher and proper footgear, such as lug-soled boots with good traction, are strongly recommended. Hands may occasionally be used for balance in climbing.

3 = Handholds and footholds are used; lug-soled boots are required. Exposure is such that some persons may wish to be belayed at times, so a rope, and knowledge of its use, should be taken.

Although experienced persons in good physical condition may find that they can make some of these climbs more easily and quickly than indicated by the ratings here, these ratings are intended for the average Scout Unit that has a continuing backpack program. Even though some mountains involving Class 3 climbing have been included, they are relatively easy for persons with considerable experience in route finding and climbing Class 2. When in doubt, turn back! It is usually more difficult to climb down Class 3 routes than to go up. Always carefully research and plan the ascent of such a peak.

Peak climbing may be attempted most seasons, provided every safety precaution is observed! However, since snow pack conditions vary, travel over ice and snow will require additional time, capability, and proper snow and ice travel equipment. The approach rating will usually be raised by at least one letter where travel over them will be encountered.

Approved Peaks - Southern California

NameElev.Topo mapRatingTrailhead/Approach
Group A
Alto Diablo (1)10500Big Bear LakeM2Poopout Hill; Forsee Creek
Charlton10806San Gorgonio MtnM2Poopout Hill
Grinnell10284MoonridgeM2Aspen Grove (4); Poopout Hill
Lake Peak10161San Gorgonio MtnM2Aspen Grove (4); Poopout Hill
Little Charlton10696San Gorgonio MtnM2Fallsvale
Peak 9971 (2)9971San Gorgonio MtnM2Aspen Grove (4); Poopout Hill
Peak 10067 (2)10067San Gorgonio MtnM2Aspen Grove (4); Poopout Hill
Red Tahquitz8720San Jacinto PeakM2Humber Park/Saddle Jct
South Peak7840IdyllwildM2Humber Park/Saddle Jct
Tahquitz8846San Jacinto PeakM1Humber Park/Saddle Jct
Zahniser (3)10156San Gorgonio MtnM2Poopout Hill; Dry Lake
  1. East of Shields Flat (approximately 0.6 mile)
  2. ESE of Lake Peak
  3. North of Mine Shaft Saddle
  4. Fish Creek Meadow trailhead does not meet minimum hiking hours for Peak Bagger trip.
Group B
Anderson Peak10840Big Bear LakeM1Barton Flats; Forsee Creek
Dobbs Peak10459San Gorgonio MtnM2Poopout Hill
E. San Bernardino10691Big Bear LakeM1Barton Flats; Forsee Creek
Jepson Peak11205San Gorgonio MtnM2Poopout Hill; Vivian Creek
Mt. San Gorgonio11499San Gorgonio MtnM1Poopout Hill; Vivian Creek
Shields Peak10680Big Bear LakeM1Barton Flats; Forsee Creek
Sugarloaf Mtn9952MoonridgeM1Hwy. 38; Wildhorse Creek
Group C
Big Horn*10997San Gorgonio Mtn.M2Poopout Hill; Vivian Creek
Folly Peak10480San Jacinto PeakM2Round Vly; Little Round Vly
Jean Peak10670San Jacinto PeakM2Round Vly; Little Round Vly
Mt. San Jacinto10804San Jacinto PeakM1Round Vly; Little Round Vly
San Bernardino10649Big Bear LakeM1Angelus Oaks
* SSE of Mt. San Gorgonio, about 0.7 miles.

Approved Peaks - Sierras

NameElev.Topo mapRatingTrailhead/Approach
Group A
Blackrock Mtn9635Casa Vieja MeadowsM2Kennedy Meadows
Kaiser Peak10320Kaiser PeakH1Lakeshore
Mono Dome10614Mt. DanaM2Log Cabin Mine
Peak 9870*9870Mt. SillimanM2Horse Corral Creek
Shell Mountain9594Muir GroveM2Stoney Creek Campground
* Between Pond Meadow and Mitchell Peak.
Group B
Corral Mtn9680Courtwright ReservoirM2Courtwright Reservoir
Hoffman Mtn9622Rough SpurM2Wishon Reservoir
Tioga Peak11513Mt. DanaM2Warren Fork; Saddlebag Lake
Twin Peaks10485Mt. SillimanH2Lodgepole
Group C
Alta Peak11204LodgepoleM2Wolverton; Giant Forest
Blacktop Peak12668Koip PeakH2Crest Creek; Alger Lakes
Brown Mt.9958Templeton MountainL2Sage Flats; Cottonwood
Castle Peak10677Tehipite DomeM2Wishon Reservoir; Chain Lakes
ue Peak12900Cirque PeakH2Cottonwood; New Army Pass*
Coyote Peak10892Kern LakeL2Mineral King/Coyote Lake
Deer Mt.9410Haiwee PassM2Kennedy Mdw
Fleming Mtn10796Mt. HenryL2Courtwright Reservoir
Goode, Mt.13092North PalisadeH2South Lake
Gould, Mt.13005Mt. Clarence KingM2Onion Valley
Iron Mtn11149Cattle MtnH1Ashley Lake
"""L2Iron Lake
Julius Caesar, Mt.13196Mt. HilgardH2Pine Creek
Kearsarge Peak12598Kearsarge PeakM2Onion Valley
Kern Peak11510Kern PeakS2Cottonwood/Ramshaw Mdw
Kettle Peak10041Mt. SillimanH2Lodgepole
Lamark, Mt.13417Mt. DarwinH2North Lake; Lake Sabrina
Lee Vining Peak11691Mt. DanaM2Log Cabin Mine
Loper Peak10059Courtwright ReservoirM2Wishon Reservoir
Maggie Mt.10042Quinn PeakL2Maggie Lakes
Mitchell Peak10365Mt. SillimanM1Horse Corral Mdw; Lodgepole
Monache Mtn9410Monache MtnM2Kennedy Mdw
Morgan, Mt.13748Mt. MorganM2Rock Creek
Muah Mtn11016BartlettM2Cottonwood; Mulkey Mdw
Nelson Mtn10220Nelson MtnM2Dinkey Creek Road
Spanish Mtn10051Rough SpurH2Wishon Reservoir; Spanish Lakes
Starr, Mt.12870Mt. AbbottM2Rock Creek
Templeton Mtn9932Templeton MtnS2Cottonwood
Three Sisters10619Dogtooth PeakL2Dinkey Creek Road
Vandever Mtn11947Mineral KingM2Mineral King
Warren, Mt.12327Mt. DanaH2Warren Fork; Log Cabin Mine
White Chief Peak11020Mineral KingM2Mineral King
* Cirque is a D peak when approached from Chicken Spring Lake.
Group D
Agassiz, Mt.13891North PalisadeH2South Lake/Bishop Pass
Angora Mtn10202Kern LakeL2Mineral King
Bago, Mt.11869Mt. Clarence KingL2Charlotte Lake
Banner Peak12945Mt. RitterS3Thousand Island Lake
Basin Mtn13240Mt. TomH2Horton Creek
Blackcap Mtn11559Blackcap MtnL2Wishon Reservoir; Kings River
Cirque Peak12900Cirque PeakH2Chicken Spring Lake, Long Lake*
Dade, Mt.13600Mt. AbbottH2Rock Creek/Treasure Lakes
Dana, Mt.13053Mt. DanaH2Tioga Pass
Davis, Mt.12311Mt. RitterS2Thousand Island Lake
Florence Peak12432Mineral KingH2Mineral King/Franklin Pass
Gayley, Mt.13510Split MtnH3So. Fork Big Pine Creek
Graveyard Peak11494Graveyard PeakH2Edison Lake/Graveyard Lakes
Guyot, Mt.12300Mt. WhitneyL2Cottonwood/Guyot Flat
Hitchcock, Mt.13184Mt. WhitneyL2Crabtree Lakes
Hutchings, Mt.10785The SphinxS2Kings Canyon
Johnson Peak11371Johnson PeakL2Mineral King
Kennedy Mtn11433Slide BluffsS2Kings Canyon
Langley, Mt.14042Mt. LangleyH2Cottonwood/ New Army Pass
Lone Pine Peak12944Mt. LangleyH2Whitney Portal/Meysan Lake
Mallory, Mt.13850Mt. WhitneyH2Whitney Portal/Meysan Lake
Muir, Mt.14015Mt. WhitneyL3Crabtree Mdw
Red Mtn11951Mt. HenryL2Courtwright Reservoir/Flemming Creek
Sawtooth Peak12343Mineral KingS2Mineral King/Sawtooth Pass
Silver Peak11878Sharktooth PeakL2Edison Lake
Tom, Mt.13652Mt. TomH2Horton Creek
Tyndall, Mt.14018Mt. WilliamsonS2Symmes Creek/Shepherd Pass
Whitney, Mt.14495Mt. WhitneyL1Crabtree Mdw
"""S1Whitney Portal
* Cirque is a C peak when approached from Cottonwood.
Group E
Arrow Peak12958Mt. PinchotL2Bench Lake
Baldwin, Mt.12614Convict LakeH2Lake Dorothy; Mildred Lake
Barnard, Mt.13990Mt. WilliamsonL2Wallace Lakes
Black Giant13330Mt. GoddardL2Muir Pass
Bradley, Mt.13289Mt. WilliamsonL2Center Basin
Crocker, Mt.12457Mt. AbbottS2McGee Creek; Rock Creek
Donohue Peak12023Koip PeakS2June Lake
Eagle Scout Peak12040Triple Divide PeakL2Crescent Mdw; Kaweah Gap
Electra Peak12442Mt. LyellL2Twin Lakes
Emerson, Mt.13225Mt. DarwinH2North Lake/Piute Pass
Fiske, Mt.13524Mt. DarwinL2Helen Lake; Sapphire Lake
Florence, Mt.12561Mt. LyellS2Yosemite Valley
Foerster Peak12058Mt. LyellL2Blue Lake
Gabb, Mt.13711Mt. AbbottL2Lake Italy
Henry, Mt.12196Blackcap MtnS2Courtwright Reservoir
Hilgard, Mt.13361Mt. ElgardL2Lake Italy
Hopkins, Mt.12302Mt. AbbottS2Rock Creek
Huntington, Mt.12405Mt. AbbottH2Rock Creek
"""L2Pioneer Lake
Marion Peak12719Marion PeakL2Marion Lake
Merced Peak11726Merced PeakS2Yosemite Valley
Midway Mtn13666Mt. BrewerL3Milestone Creek; Colby Lakes
Morrison, Mt.12268Convict LakeH2Convict Lake
Pinchot, Mt.13495Mt. PinchotL3Pinchot Pass
Red Slate Mtn13163Convict LakeS2McGee Creek
Rixford, Mt.12890Mt. Clarence KingS2Onion Valley
Sill, Mt.14162North PalisadeL3Palisade Basin
Silliman, Mt.11188Mt. SillimanS2Lodgepole/Twin Lakes
Stanford, Mt.12851Mt. AbbottS2McGee Creek; Rock Creek
Striped Mtn13189Mt. PinchotL2Taboose Pass
Triple Divide Peak12634Triple Divide PeakL3Tamarack Lake; Nine Lake Basin
Woodworth, Mt.12219North PalisadeL2Middle Fork Kings River
Group F
Brewer, Mt.13570Mt. BrewerS2Cedar Grove
Conness, Mt.12590Tioga PassS3Young Lakes
"""H3Saddlebag Lake
Goddard, Mt.13568Mt. GoddardL2Wanda Lake
Kaweah, Mt.13802Mt. KaweahL2Big Arroyo
Lyell, Mt.13114Mt. LyellL2Tuolumne Mdw
Maclure, Mt.12988Mt. LyellS3Tuolumne Mdw
Matterhorn Peak12264Matterhorn PeakH2Twin Lakes
Olancha Peak12123Olancha PeakH2Sage Flats
"""L2Cottonwood
Ritter, Mt.13157Mt. RitterS31000 Island Lake
Split Mtn14058Split MtnS3Red Mtn Creek
"""L2Upper Basin
University Peak13632Mt. WilliamsonS2Onion Valley
"""L2Center Basin
Williamson, Mt.14375Mt. WilliamsonS2George Creek

Approved Peaks - Philmont

Peaks from the following list that are climbed while on a trek may be used to satisfy the requirements for a Peak Bagger Award.

Group A
PeakElev
Bear Mtn10663
Big Red11024
Black Mtn10892
Bonita Peak10676
Mt. Phillips11711
Trail Peak10242

Group B
PeakElev
Baldy Mtn12441
Cimarroncito10468

There are also peaks that may be climbed for Mini-Peak Bagger credit. However, only two peak climbs on a single Philmont trek may be used toward earning an GLAAC sponsored award. Both may be Peak Bagger or Mini-Peak Bagger, or one for each award. Crew leaders must advise Philmont - Logistics, before beginning the trek, of any peak climb to be taken that is not on the route of its approved itinerary.

Sours: https://glaac-hat.org/PeakBagger.html

Mountain climbing is a dangerous sport that kills hundreds of people every year, and the author(s) of this site assume no liability whatsoever for any information presented on Peakbagger.com. The material presented here can have many factual errors and is often purely subjective opinion. Before going into the mountains, it is your responsibility to obtain the necessary experience, skills, and gear.

In particular, use trip reports, route descriptions, and GPS tracks with extreme care. They may not be accurate and many not reflect current conditions in a changeable environment. Material downloaded from any internet site is not a substitute for mountain knowledge gained by experience.

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Peak bagging

Goal to reach a collection of summits, published in the form of a list

Peak bagging or hill bagging[1] is an activity in which hikers, climbers, and mountaineers attempt to reach a collection of summits, published in the form of a list. This activity has been popularized around the world, with lists such as 100 Famous Japanese Mountains, the Sacred Mountains of China, the Seven Summits, and the eight-thousanders becoming the subject of mass public interest.

There are numerous lists that a peakbagger may choose to follow. A list usually contains a set of peaks confined to a geographical area, with the peaks having some sort of subjective popularity or objective significance, such as being among the highest or most prominent of the area. Some maps and lists may be inaccurate, however, which has implications for climbers and peak-baggers who rely on publicly reported data. [2]

Although peak bagging is a fundamental part of the sport of mountaineering, the term is strongly associated with hiking and other non-technical activities like snowshoeing. Most people who bag peaks lack technical mountaineering skills, and in fact often avoid peaks that require such knowledge. A handful of lists, such as the eight-thousanders and the Alpine four-thousanders, have an extremely high reputation among mountaineers, but in general the term "peak bagging" is a pejorative to many climbers.[3][4][5]

History[edit]

During the Silver Age of Alpinism in the late 19th century, most of the unclimbed major mountaineering objectives were reached. With the "closing" of the age of discovery of mountain peaks, interest shifted towards finding enjoyable ways to climb already-ascended mountains. In the 1890s, Sir Hugh Munro created Munro list of the highest peaks of Scotland; summiting the peaks on such lists soon became known as peak bagging.[6][7] Peak bagging was brought to the United States by Robert and George Marshall in 1918.[citation needed]

Aspects[edit]

A central part of peak bagging is the list, which details all the summits one must obtain to complete or finish the list. In some cases, a climber who finishes a list may receive some form of award, such as an emblem or badge. In the case of the eight-thousanders list, some mountaineers may become famous within the mountaineering community.[citation needed]

Clubs[edit]

Clubs are often formed to gather people who share an interest in bagging peaks on a list. Some clubs are specialized, such as the Sierra Peaks Section or the Adirondack Forty-Sixers. Alpine clubs may include peak bagging as one of the activities in which its members may participate; notable alpine clubs that maintain peak bagging lists include the Scottish Mountaineering Club, the Mazamas of Oregon and the Mountaineers of Washington. Other clubs may promote the climbing of peaks on a peak bagging list they do not maintain, or they may create an authoritative version of a list that is already popular; a reflection of this is the relationship between the 4000m peaks of Alps and the UIAA.[citation needed]

Clubs maintain listings of people who have completed peak bagging lists, and also provide opportunities for social interaction, such as through outings and club events.[citation needed]

Books[edit]

Another source of lists come from mountaineering guidebooks that detail information about how to climb peaks in a certain region. Mountaineers will often try to climb all or some of the peaks described in these books. 100 Famous Japanese Mountains, Fifty Classic Climbs of North America, and the Alpine Club Guides are notable examples of such books.[citation needed]

Reaching a summit[edit]

A topic of discussion within peak bagging circles is under what circumstances someone may consider a peak summited. Generally, the summit block has to be reached and the climber must touch or be within a few horizontal meters of the highest point. However this convention is not universal, due to the varying objectives of individual peak baggers; most peak baggers are not traditional climbers, but rather hikers who have no technical skills. Thus, a common pain point are summits may be mostly technically easy, but contain relatively small obstacles on top that nonetheless cannot be easily negotiated without being subject to exposure. Furthermore, many summits have flat tops that make discerning where the highest point is very difficult. Many clubs have special rules that attempt to address these considerations.

Alternatively, some climbers and mountaineers may consider a route to be unworthy if no technical skills are needed.

Some peak baggers increase the challenge of summiting a list of peaks in various ways, such as by requiring a minimum vertical climb per peak, climbing within a time limit, climbing in different seasons (such as winter),[8] or climbing the same peak multiple times by different routes. Traditional mountaineers and climbers may elect to only go up routes with certain climbing grades

Various organizations have adopted rules for what to do when a peak is on private land or otherwise inaccessible, whether off-road vehicles may be used, etc.

Peak bagging is distinguished from highpointing. In peak bagging, the targets are the peaks of mountains or hills, and the popular lists usually require that the target pass some threshold of elevation or prominence. In highpointing, the goal is only to reach the highest point in some geographic area (e.g. county, state, or country), whether or not it is a peak.

Summit logs[edit]

In some parts of the world, a summit register or summit log may be located in a watertight container such as a jar or can, stashed in a protected spot. Peak baggers often will write a note or log entry and leave it in the "summit log" as a record of their accomplishment. Increasingly, peak baggers are also logging their summits online by signing virtual summit logs.[9] One popular website is peakbagger.com, founded by Greg Slayden, which lists mountains and regional highpoints. It allows peak baggers to record their summits.[10][11]

Arguments for and against[edit]

The term "peak bagging" can have a negative connotation among traditional mountaineers.[3][4] Traditional climbers or adventurers may argue that peak bagging devalues the experience of climbing in favour of the achievement of reaching an arbitrary point on a map; that bagging reduces climbing to the status of stamp collecting or train spotting; or that is seen as obsessive and beside the point. For example, in explaining why he chose to remove some minor peaks from his guidebook, climber Steve Roper wrote:

Most of the peaks had as their first ascenders those who in a former day would have been called explorers but now could only be thought of as peakbaggers, interested primarily in trudging endlessly over heaps of stones, building cairns, and inserting their business cards into specifically designed canisters especially carried for this purpose. But perhaps I am being too harsh. They’re having their fun.[12]

Some peak baggers say peak bagging is a motivation to keep reaching new summits. For mountain range peak lists, attaining the goal provides the peak bagger with a deeper appreciation for the topography of the range. For example, each peak is typically enjoyed from multiple aspects as the peak bagger also climbs the major neighboring summits.[citation needed]

There is also concern that encouraging the climbing of certain mountains has caused trail damage from erosion through heavy use and, where mountains have no trails, created trails. Proponents note that many peak baggers become active in maintaining trails and more aware about mitigating damage than casual hikers.[citation needed]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Hill Bagging". www.hill-bagging.co.uk.
  2. ^Michal Apollo, Joanna Mostowska, Kamil Maciuk, Yana Wengel, Thomas E. Jones & Joseph M. Cheer (2020) Peak-bagging and cartographic misrepresentations: a call to correction, Current Issues in Tourism, https://doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2020.1812541
  3. ^ abDavid Reuther; John Thorn (1 October 1998). The Armchair Mountaineer. Menasha Ridge Press. ISBN .
  4. ^ abMeyer, John (2019-11-21). "Colorado woman first to climb all 846 peaks above 13,000 feet in every state but Alaska". The Know. Retrieved 2020-03-29.
  5. ^Frick-Wright, Peter (2019-01-15). "The Mad, Obsessive Quest to Summit the World's Highest Points". Outside Online. Retrieved 2020-03-29.
  6. ^Lew, Alan A. and Han, Guosheng (2015). A World Geography of Mountain Trekking. In G. Musa, A. Thompson-Carr and J. Higham, eds., Mountaineering Tourism, pp. (forthcoming). Oxford: Routledge. (pre-publication copy)
  7. ^Michal Apollo, Joanna Mostowska, Kamil Maciuk, Yana Wengel, Thomas E. Jones & Joseph M. Cheer (2020) Peak-bagging and cartographic misrepresentations: a call to correction, Current Issues in Tourism, https://doi.org/10.1080/13683500.2020.1812541
  8. ^"4000 footers in a single winter season".
  9. ^Andrew Becker. "I Was Here - A High Sierra search for the voices of climbers past - Sierra Club, Sierra Magazine, July/August 2008". Retrieved 2008-10-30.
  10. ^{{cite news|url=https://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/17/travel/maine-mt-baker-hiking.html%7Ctitle=Bushwhacking Up Maine's Baker Mountain|work=The New York Times|last=Axelson|first=Gustave|date=April 13, 2016|access-date=September 18, 2021}
  11. ^Rodriguez, Joe (August 20, 2014). "Silicon Valley 'peak bagger' leads pursuit of Sierra Nevada". The Mercury News. Retrieved September 18, 2021.
  12. ^Steve Roper, The Climber’s Guide to the High Sierra, copyright ©1976 by Sierra Club Books

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peak_bagging
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Peakbagger

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3) Open a GPX file in your Web browser, then click "Share" in the browser's menu, then select "Peakbagger"

4) Download or copy a GPX, KML, or KMZ file to your phone manually, then open it with a file browsing app (such as Discoverer)

Sours: https://play.google.com/

Bagger peak

Screenshots

Description

Bring the mountains with you wherever you go!

* Search the huge database of mountains and trip reports from Peakbagger.com and ListsOfJohn.com
* Keep track of your climbs, even when offline
* Measure your progress against hundreds of peak lists
* Get route information and directions from SummitPost and ListsofJohn.com
* Find peaks near your current location, or near other peaks
* Filter peaks by prominence, or climbed vs. unclimbed, or inclusion on a peak list
* See what other peaks are often climbed together with your target peak
* Create custom peak lists and order them by your personal priorities

* See weather forecasts for all U.S. peaks from the National Weather Service, and for 11,000+ major peaks worldwide from mountain-forecast.com
* See topographic maps for anywhere in the world (+/- 60 degrees latitude)
* See protected land area coverage in North America, Europe, Japan, and Australia and New Zealand
* US Forest Service maps
* Save a peak to your device for offline use, including topographic maps
* Download topographic maps along a route for offline use

* Import and display GPS tracks and waypoints instantly
* On-screen compass keeps you oriented along your track

* Long click on the map to get Street View, elevation, and driving directions
* Record your starting elevation, distance, and information about the gear and route you used
* Leaderboards show the top climbers for each peak list
* See peaks your Peakbagger buddies have climbed recently
* Update your buddy list from right in the app

* Automatically upload your ascents to ListsOfJohn (U.S. peaks)
* Show daily satellite imagery for any location on any day since 2011
* Display elevation profile for a GPS track, and show your current location along the profile
* See sunrise and sunset times at a peak, even when offline
* Daily forest fire coverage, and historical coverage for the last 20 years (U.S.)
* Constantly updated weather radar and smoke layers on the map

* Record GPS tracks, including timestamps, and add them to your ascents
* Record waypoints along your route
* Organize your tracks in folders
* Create and edit tracks right in the app

* Automatically find survey benchmarks near peaks (U.S.)
* Hunt benchmarks and get your finds recorded in the official government benchmark data sheets

HOW TO IMPORT GPS TRACKS - 2 OPTIONS

1) Click on the "Load GPS track" link on the ascent details page for an ascent that has a GPS track.

2) Click on a GPX, KML, KMZ or FIT file on your phone, for example, in an email attachment or on Google Drive


Continued use of GPS running in the background can dramatically decrease battery life.

Version 1.46.3

- Show prominence on climbed peaks on the map
- See what peaks on a list one of your buddies has climbed ("View as buddy" from menu when viewing a list)
- Filter option to see all nearby peaks above a prominence threshold, or peaks on a list, at the same time
- Sort list of peak lists by distance to you
- Indicate which peaks are saved when looking at a list
- German, Russian, Lithuanian translations
- Update offline peak databases
- Add 2021 fire layer

Ratings and Reviews

Great app

I love this app, i use it to keep track of my mountains and also bushwhacking. This last updating unfortunately is giving me issues on saving the peak for offline. If there is a track to download it works just fine.

Amazing!

Can’t believe this is free, so much functionality, has really added a whole new dimension to hiking and backpacking. I would pay >$100 for this. Thank you!

Favorite app on my phone

This app is easy to use, very in depth, and extremely useful. I can’t recommend it enough.

The developer, Andrew Kirmse, indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

Data Linked to You

The following data may be collected and linked to your identity:

Data Not Linked to You

The following data may be collected but it is not linked to your identity:

Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

Information

Seller
Andrew Kirmse

Size
68.8 MB

Category
Health & Fitness

Compatibility
iPhone
Requires iOS 12.0 or later.
iPad
Requires iPadOS 12.0 or later.
iPod touch
Requires iOS 12.0 or later.
Mac
Requires macOS 11.0 or later and a Mac with Apple M1 chip.
Languages

English, French, German, Lithuanian, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish

Age Rating
4+

Location
This app may use your location even when it isn’t open, which can decrease battery life.

Copyright
© 2014-2021 Andrew Kirmse

Price
Free

Supports

  • Family Sharing

    With Family Sharing set up, up to six family members can use this app.

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Sours: https://apps.apple.com/us/app/peakbagger/id1040718067
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