1950 dollar value vs today

Calculate the Value of $100 in 1950

What is $0.1k in 1950 worth in today's money?

$1,104

Adjusted for inflation, $100 in 1950 is equal to $1,104 in 2021.

Annual inflation over this period was 3.44%.

Value of a dollar. Calculates inflation to see what a U.S. dollar was worth in the past and today. View historical and today's current inflation rates, using the CPI provided by the United States government. Inflation data is updated regularly, so results may differ from other websites. How much has the cost of living increased? What was inflation for a specific period?

How much is $100 in 1950 dollars worth?

YearEquivalent
2021$1,104
2020$1,089
2019$1,065
2018$1,045
2017$1,023
2016$1,002
2015$995
2014$987
2013$973
2012$956
2011$929
2010$915
2009$891
2008$890
2007$855
2006$834
2005$806
2004$781
2003$767
2002$749
2001$737
2000$713
1999$694
1998$683
1997$672
1996$650
1995$634
YearEquivalent
1994$618
1993$601
1992$584
1991$567
1990$534
1989$511
1988$489
1987$468
1986$463
1985$446
1984$429
1983$414
1982$398
1981$366
1980$325
1979$287
1978$263
1977$247
1976$235
1975$220
1974$196
1973$180
1972$174
1971$169
1970$160
1969$150
1968$144
YearEquivalent
1967$139
1966$135
1965$132
1964$131
1963$129
1962$127
1961$126
1960$125
1959$122
1958$120
1957$117
1956$114
1955$113
1954$114
1953$113
1952$112
1951$106
1950$100
1949$102
1948$99
1947$91
1946$77
1945$75
1944$74
1943$72
1942$66
1941$60
YearEquivalent
1940$59
1939$59
1938$61
1937$59
1936$58
1935$57
1934$56
1933$56
1932$62
1931$68
1930$73
1929$72
1928$73
1927$75
1926$76
1925$73
1924$73
1923$72
1922$73
1921$82
1920$80
1919$70
1918$58
1917$49
1916$44
1915$43
1914$42
Sours: https://www.dollartimes.com/inflation/inflation.php?amount=100&year=1950

Inflation Calculator

What’s a dollar worth?

Find out here. Use the consumer price index (CPI), which measures the average change in prices over time using a market basket of goods and services, to see how far your dollar goes today, compared with previous years.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics releases CPI data monthly, as well as the following historical indexes:

You can also use the inflation calculator app

  • Download “What is a Dollar Worth” in the iTunes store. The free app will work on your iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad.

Here’s how you can use the CPI to make calculations. For example, what would an item or service purchased in 2021 be worth in 1950 dollars?

Let’s say you have $7 in your pocket to purchase some goods and services today. How much money would you have needed in 1950 to buy the same amount of goods and services?

The CPI for 1950 = 24.1

The CPI for 2021 = 271.4*

Use the following formula to compute the calculation:

1950 price = 2021 price x (1950 CPI / 2021 CPI*)

$0.62 = $7.00 x (24.1 / 271.4)

Going the other way, what would an item or service purchased in 1950, for example, be worth in 2021 dollars?

Let's say your parents told you that in 1950 a movie cost 25 cents. How could you tell if movies have increased in price faster or slower than most goods and services? To convert that price into today’s dollars, use the CPI.

The CPI for 1950 = 24.1

The CPI for 2021 = 271.4*

A movie in 1950 = $0.25

Use the following formula to compute the calculation:

2021 price = 1950 price x (2021 CPI* / 1950 CPI)

$2.81 = $0.25 x (271.4 / 24.1)

A full-price movie at a Minneapolis theater these days is likely to cost between $7.00 and $11.00, or even more. It looks like movies have increased in price faster than most other goods and services.

*An estimate for 2021 is based on the change in the CPI from second quarter 2020 to second quarter 2021.

Sours: https://www.minneapolisfed.org/about-us/monetary-policy/inflation-calculator
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$100 in 1950 is worth $1,017.10 in 2017

👉 You may be interested in Inflation from 1950 to 2021

Value of $100 from 1950 to 2017

$100 in 1950 is equivalent in purchasing power to about $1,017.10 in 2017, an increase of $917.10 over 67 years. The dollar had an average inflation rate of 3.52% per year between 1950 and 2017, producing a cumulative price increase of 917.10%.

This means that prices in 2017 are 10.17 times higher than average prices since 1950, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics consumer price index.

The 1950 inflation rate was 1.26%. The inflation rate in 2017 was 2.13%. The 2017 inflation rate is lower compared to the average inflation rate of 2.85% per year between 2017 and 2021.


Cumulative price change 917.10%
Average inflation rate 3.52%
Converted amount ($100 base) $1,017.10
Price difference ($100 base) $917.10
CPI in 1950 24.100
CPI in 2017 245.120
Inflation in 1950 1.26%
Inflation in 2017 2.13%
$100 in 1950 $1,017.10 in 2017

USD Inflation since 1913

Annual Rate, the Bureau of Labor Statistics CPI

Download

Buying power of $100 in 1950

This chart shows a calculation of buying power equivalence for $100 in 1950 (price index tracking began in 1635).

For example, if you started with $100, you would need to end with $1,017.10 in order to "adjust" for inflation (sometimes refered to as "beating inflation").

Download

When $100 is equivalent to $1,017.10 over time, that means that the "real value" of a single U.S. dollar decreases over time. In other words, a dollar will pay for fewer items at the store.

This effect explains how inflation erodes the value of a dollar over time. By calculating the value in 1950 dollars, the chart below shows how $100 is worth less over 67 years.

Download

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, each of these USD amounts below is equal in terms of what it could buy at the time:

YearDollar ValueInflation Rate
1950$100.001.26%
1951$107.887.88%
1952$109.961.92%
1953$110.790.75%
1954$111.620.75%
1955$111.20-0.37%
1956$112.861.49%
1957$116.603.31%
1958$119.922.85%
1959$120.750.69%
1960$122.821.72%
1961$124.071.01%
1962$125.311.00%
1963$126.971.32%
1964$128.631.31%
1965$130.711.61%
1966$134.442.86%
1967$138.593.09%
1968$144.404.19%
1969$152.285.46%
1970$161.005.72%
1971$168.054.38%
1972$173.443.21%
1973$184.236.22%
1974$204.5611.04%
1975$223.249.13%
1976$236.105.76%
1977$251.456.50%
1978$270.547.59%
1979$301.2411.35%
1980$341.9113.50%
1981$377.1810.32%
1982$400.416.16%
1983$413.283.21%
1984$431.124.32%
1985$446.473.56%
1986$454.771.86%
1987$471.373.65%
1988$490.874.14%
1989$514.524.82%
1990$542.325.40%
1991$565.154.21%
1992$582.163.01%
1993$599.592.99%
1994$614.942.56%
1995$632.372.83%
1996$651.042.95%
1997$665.982.29%
1998$676.351.56%
1999$691.292.21%
2000$714.523.36%
2001$734.852.85%
2002$746.471.58%
2003$763.492.28%
2004$783.822.66%
2005$810.373.39%
2006$836.513.23%
2007$860.342.85%
2008$893.373.84%
2009$890.20-0.36%
2010$904.801.64%
2011$933.363.16%
2012$952.672.07%
2013$966.631.46%
2014$982.311.62%
2015$983.470.12%
2016$995.881.26%
2017$1,017.102.13%
2018$1,042.452.49%
2019$1,060.821.76%
2020$1,073.911.23%
2021$1,138.225.99%*
* Compared to previous annual rate. Not final. See inflation summaryfor latest 12-month trailing value.

Click to show 61 more rows

This conversion table shows various other 1950 amounts in 2017 dollars, based on the 917.10% change in prices:

Initial valueEquivalent value
$1 dollar in 1950 $10.17 dollars in 2017
$5 dollars in 1950 $50.85 dollars in 2017
$10 dollars in 1950 $101.71 dollars in 2017
$50 dollars in 1950 $508.55 dollars in 2017
$100 dollars in 1950 $1,017.10 dollars in 2017
$500 dollars in 1950 $5,085.48 dollars in 2017
$1,000 dollars in 1950 $10,170.95 dollars in 2017
$5,000 dollars in 1950 $50,854.77 dollars in 2017
$10,000 dollars in 1950 $101,709.54 dollars in 2017
$50,000 dollars in 1950 $508,547.72 dollars in 2017
$100,000 dollars in 1950 $1,017,095.44 dollars in 2017
$500,000 dollars in 1950 $5,085,477.18 dollars in 2017
$1,000,000 dollars in 1950 $10,170,954.36 dollars in 2017

Inflation by City

Inflation can vary widely by city, even within the United States. Here's how some cities fared in 1950 to 2017 (figures shown are purchasing power equivalents of $100):

  • San Francisco, California: 3.85% average rate, $100 → $1,253.08, cumulative change of 1,153.08%
  • Seattle, Washington: 3.71% average rate, $100 → $1,145.25, cumulative change of 1,045.25%
  • Boston, Massachusetts: 3.67% average rate, $100 → $1,116.82, cumulative change of 1,016.82%
  • New York: 3.63% average rate, $100 → $1,091.18, cumulative change of 991.18%
  • Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 3.51% average rate, $100 → $1,005.70, cumulative change of 905.70%
  • Atlanta, Georgia: 3.45% average rate, $100 → $970.53, cumulative change of 870.53%
  • Chicago, Illinois: 3.44% average rate, $100 → $963.35, cumulative change of 863.35%
  • Houston, Texas: 3.41% average rate, $100 → $944.93, cumulative change of 844.93%
  • Detroit, Michigan: 3.37% average rate, $100 → $922.93, cumulative change of 822.93%

San Francisco, California experienced the highest rate of inflation during the 67 years between 1950 and 2017 (3.85%).

Detroit, Michigan experienced the lowest rate of inflation during the 67 years between 1950 and 2017 (3.37%).

Note that some locations showing 0% inflation may have not yet reported latest data.


Inflation by Country

Inflation can also vary widely by country. For comparison, in the UK £100.00 in 1950 would be equivalent to £3,257.27 in 2017, an absolute change of £3,157.27 and a cumulative change of 3,157.27%.

In Canada, CA$100.00 in 1950 would be equivalent to CA$1,010.85 in 2017, an absolute change of CA$910.85 and a cumulative change of 910.85%.

Compare these numbers to the US's overall absolute change of $917.10 and total percent change of 917.10%.


Inflation by Spending Category

CPI is the weighted combination of many categories of spending that are tracked by the government. Breaking down these categories helps explain the main drivers behind price changes. This chart shows the average rate of inflation for select CPI categories between 1950 and 2017.

Compare these values to the overall average of 3.52% per year:

The graph below compares inflation in categories of goods over time. Click on a category such as "Food" to toggle it on or off:

For all these visualizations, it's important to note that not all categories may have been tracked since 1950. This table and charts use the earliest available data for each category.



How to Calculate Inflation Rate for $100, 1950 to 2017

Our calculations use the following inflation rate formula to calculate the change in value between 1950 and 2017:

CPI in 2017CPI in 1950

×

1950 USD value

=

2017 USD value

Then plug in historical CPI values. The U.S. CPI was 24.1 in the year 1950 and 245.12 in 2017:

245.1224.1

×

$100

=

$1,017.10

$100 in 1950 has the same "purchasing power" or "buying power" as $1,017.10 in 2017.

To get the total inflation rate for the 67 years between 1950 and 2017, we use the following formula:

CPI in 2017 - CPI in 1950CPI in 1950

×

100

=

Cumulative inflation rate (67 years)

Plugging in the values to this equation, we get:

245.12 - 24.124.1

×

100

=

917%


Comparison to S&P 500 Index

The average inflation rate of 3.52% has a compounding effect between 1950 and 2017. As noted above, this yearly inflation rate compounds to produce an overall price difference of 917.10% over 67 years.

To help put this inflation into perspective, if we had invested $100 in the S&P 500 index in 1950, our investment would be nominally worth approximately $147,825.79 in 2017. This is a return on investment of 147,725.79%, with an absolute return of $147,725.79 on top of the original $100.

These numbers are not inflation adjusted, so they are considered nominal. In order to evaluate the real return on our investment, we must calculate the return with inflation taken into account.

The compounding effect of inflation would account for 90.17% of returns ($133,291.68) during this period. This means the inflation-adjusted real return of our $100 investment is $14,434.11. You may also want to account for capital gains tax, which would take your real return down to around $12,269 for most people.

Original AmountFinal AmountChange
Nominal$100$147,825.79147,725.79%
Real
Inflation Adjusted
$100$14,534.1114,434.11%

Information displayed above may differ slightly from other S&P 500 calculators. Minor discrepancies can occur because we use the latest CPI data for inflation, annualized inflation numbers for previous years, and we compute S&P price and dividends from January of 1950 to latest available data for 2017 using average monthly close price.

For more details on the S&P 500 between 1950 and 2017, see the stock market returns calculator.


News headlines from 1950

Politics and news often influence economic performance. Here's what was happening at the time:

  • Jerusalem is proclaimed the capital of Israel by Knesset
  • North Korea invades South Korea.
  • Harry Truman announces that America will seek to develop a hydrogen bomb.
  • Chinese forces occupy Tibet.

Data Source & Citation

Raw data for these calculations comes from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Consumer Price Index (CPI), established in 1913. Inflation data from 1665 to 1912 is sourced from a historical study conducted by political science professor Robert Sahr at Oregon State University.

You may use the following MLA citation for this page: “1950 dollars in 2017 | Inflation Calculator.” Official Inflation Data, Alioth Finance, 13 Oct. 2021, https://www.officialdata.org/1950-dollars-in-2017.

Special thanks to QuickChart for their chart image API, which is used for chart downloads.


Ian Webster

About the author

Ian Webster is an engineer and data expert based in San Mateo, California. He has worked for Google, NASA, and consulted for governments around the world on data pipelines and data analysis. Disappointed by the lack of clear resources on the impacts of inflation on economic indicators, Ian believes this website serves as a valuable public tool. Ian earned his degree in Computer Science from Dartmouth College.

Email · LinkedIn · Twitter


Sours: https://www.officialdata.org/1950-dollars-in-2017
$1 bills

$1 bills | Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Living the good life didn’t cost a lot in 1950, at least at first glance. The average home was worth $7,354, a new Volkswagen Beetle could be yours for $1,280, and tuition at the University of Pennsylvania was $600.

All that sounds like a bargain until you realize the average family took home just $4,237 per year. Minimum wage was 75 cents an hour, and those with jobs in industries like manufacturing, finance, and government had an average hourly wage of $1.50. When you look at those numbers, $1,200 cars and college tuition doesn’t sound like such a bargain.

In hindsight, 1950s-era prices look low, but things even out quite a bit once you account for inflation. A dollar in 1950 gives you the same spending power as $10 today. So, yes, you may have been able to buy a cup of coffee for a nickel in 1950, but a nickel was worth considerably more back then (about 50 cents in today’s dollars). But that’s not to say some things haven’t gotten more expensive in the intervening 60-plus years.

If tuition prices at Penn had risen in line with inflation, undergrads would be paying $6,000 to attend; instead, the sticker price for an Ivy League education has ballooned to $42,176. The MSRP for a new Beetle is just under $20,000; the inflation-adjusted price of the 1950 car would be about $13,000. Real wages for American workers, meanwhile, have stagnated. Is it any wonder people are nostalgic for the good old days, when a dollar could buy you more than a cup of coffee at McDonald’s? To get a sense of how far $1 really used to go, check out this list of seven things you could get for a buck back in 1950.

1. Four gallons of gas

gas station

A 1950s era gas station | Photo by George Marks/Retrofile/Getty Images

A gallon of gas was 27 cents in 1950, according to historical data from the U.S. Department of Energy. Four gallons would have cost you $1.08. That sounds pretty cheap, but the 1950 price was equivalent to $2.14 a gallon in 2015, only 31 cents less than 2015’s average per-gallon price of $2.45.

2. A pound of coffee

making coffee

A woman making coffee at home in 1949 | Keystone Features/Getty Images

Back in the 1950s, you could pick up many of the items on your grocery list for less than $1. Vintage supermarket ads shared by the Houston Chronicle give you an idea of what it would have cost to stock your pantry, with 5 pounds of flour selling for 39 cents and 2 packages of spaghetti going for 27 cents at Lucky 7 Stores in 1950. Coffee was one of the more expensive items. You could get a pound of Bright & Early Coffee for 79 cents, the equivalent of $7.49 today.

3. Four books

jane russell

Actress Jane Russell reading at home in 1951 | Keystone Features/Getty Images

Cheap pulp paperbacks with their lurid covers and salacious taglines were big business in mid-century America. In 1950, you could pick up books like The Big Nightby Stanley Ellin (“eight savage hours of whiskey and women!”) or The Small Back Roomby Nigel Balchin (“the story of an inadequate man”) for a quarter each. In comparison, best-selling mass-market paperbacks like Game of Thronescost about $10 today, or the equivalent of $1 in 1950.

4. Two movie tickets

drive in movie theater

A drive-in movie theater in the 1950s | Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Catching the latest hit movie cost a lot less in the 1950s than it does today. In 1948, the average movie ticket cost 36 cents; by 1954 it had climbed 13 cents to 49 cents, according to the National Association of Theatre Owners. In today’s dollars, that’s less than $5 for a movie. In 2015, the average movie ticket would set you back $8.43.

5. A week’s worth of subway fares

subway station

A New York City subway station |Spencer Platt/Getty Images

In 1950, a dime got you a ride on the New York City subway. Commuters who made one round-trip every weekday would have spent $1 every week on subway fares. Today, a single ride subway ticket is $3, the equivalent of 30 cents in 1950. (Per-ride fares are slightly less if you buy a MetroCard, which didn’t exist in 1950.)

6. Half-a-dozen packs of cigarettes

smoking

Actors Danny Kaye, Laurence Olivier and Sid Field, lighting their cigarettes together | Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

A pack of cigarettes cost an average of 15 cents in 1950, the equivalent of $1.49 today, according to an analysis by Graphiq. At those prices, six packs of smokes would cost you 90 cents. You’ll shell out a lot more for your Marlboros and Lucky Strikes today. The average prices of a pack of cigarettes in the U.S. is now $7.26, according to The Awl.

7. A ticket to the MLB All-Star game

jackie robinson

Jackie Robinson in 1951. | Photo by Keystone/Getty Images

In 1950, you didn’t have to spend a small fortune to see baseball legends Jackie Robinson, Yogi Berra, and Ted Williams play in the MLB All-Star Game at Chicago’s Comiskey Park. Bleacher tickets for the big event sold for $1 – or about $10 in 2016 dollars. In comparison, tickets to the 2016 All-Star Game in San Diego went for an average of $506 on the resale market.

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Today vs dollar 1950 value

Value of 1950 New Zealand Dollars today

How to calculate today's value of money after inflation?

There are several ways to calculate the time value of money. Depending on the data available, results can be obtained by using the compound interest formula or the Consumer Price Index (CPI) formula.

Using the compound interest formula

Given that money changes with time as a result of an inflation rate that acts as a compound interest, the following formula can be used: FV = PV (1 + i)n, where:

  • FV: Future Value
  • PV: Present Value
  • i: Interest rate (inflation)
  • n: Number of times the interest is compounded (i.e. # of years)

In this case, the future value represents the final amount obtained after applying the inflation rate to our initial value. In other words, it indicates how much are $100 worth today. There are 71 years between 1950 and 2021 and the average inflation rate has been 5.1815%. Therefore, we can resolve the formula like this:

FV = PV (1 + i)n = $100 * (1 + 0.05)71 = $3,795.52

Using the CPI formula

When the CPI for both start and end years is known, the following formula can be used:

Final value = Initial value *

CPI final/CPI initial

In this case, the CPI in 1950 was 2.85 and the CPI today is 108.35. Therefore,

Final value = Initial value *

CPI final/CPI initial

= $100 *

108.26/2.85

= $3,795.52

New Zealand inflation - Conversion table

Initial ValueEquivalent value
$1 dollar in 1950$37.99 dollars today
$5 dollars in 1950$189.94 dollars today
$10 dollars in 1950$379.87 dollars today
$50 dollars in 1950$1,899.35 dollars today
$100 dollars in 1950$3,798.71 dollars today
$500 dollars in 1950$18,993.53 dollars today
$1,000 dollars in 1950$37,987.05 dollars today
$5,000 dollars in 1950$189,935.26 dollars today
$10,000 dollars in 1950$379,870.53 dollars today
$50,000 dollars in 1950$1,899,352.63 dollars today
$100,000 dollars in 1950$3,798,705.27 dollars today
$500,000 dollars in 1950$18,993,526.33 dollars today
$1,000,000 dollars in 1950$37,987,052.66 dollars today
Sours: https://www.inflationtool.com/new-zealand-dollar/1950-to-present-value

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