Amish photos

WillardAmish woman in blue dress and black cape in field

Willard

maxymPennsylvania Farmland With Rainy Sky

maxym

vladislavgajicAmish farm and laundry

vladislavgajic

DelmasLehmanAmish Carriage in Fog

DelmasLehman

kanarevaSale, colorful fabrics in the store.

kanareva

WillardLow angle view of Amish girl walking in a field

Willard

DelmasLehmanAmish Horse and Carriage

DelmasLehman

WillardAmish woman standing in grassy field with afternoon sunlight

Willard

vladislavgajicAmish carriage

vladislavgajic

WillardAmish man's straw hat hangs on a red barn door

Willard

RebeccajwAmish Buggy

Rebeccajw

appalachianviewHome and barn on the farm fields and rolling hills of Southern Y

appalachianview

WillardAmish bonnet and straw hat hanging on wall

Willard

urban_lightAmish Girls

urban_light

ImageSupplyMachine in Amish Country

ImageSupply

WollwerthAmish horse cart

Wollwerth

StephanieFreyAmish Child

StephanieFrey

appalachianviewVintage processed photo of farm fields and homes in Southern Yor

appalachianview

SOMATUSCANIAmish Farmers

SOMATUSCANI

kiyyahAmish Country Road

kiyyah

SOMATUSCANIAmish Farmer

SOMATUSCANI

vladislavgajicAmish farm and laundry

vladislavgajic

WillardDefocused Amish woman walking in a field

Willard

kathyclarkAmish Wheat Stacks

kathyclark

juice_teamColorful fabrics in the store. close up

juice_team

LeeSniderLancaster County, PA: Two Amish Ben Riding in Buggy

LeeSnider

zenmaster8Amish Man and Boy

zenmaster8

WillardDefocused Amish woman walking in a field

Willard

paulbradyphotoAmish Carriage Along Pennsylvania Road

paulbradyphoto

WillardSelective focus of Amish man's straw hat on barn door

Willard

izanbarAmish while farming with horses at sunset

izanbar

paulbradyphotoAmish horse drawn carriage

paulbradyphoto

woodkernAmish Farmer and Plow Horses

woodkern

StephanieFreyAmish Clothing

StephanieFrey

juice_teamSale - colorful fabrics in the store, close up

juice_team

woodkernTraditional Amish Farming

woodkern

WillardYoung barefoot Amish girl isolated on a background

Willard

DelmasLehmanAmish Farm at Sunrise

DelmasLehman

maxymAmish Country

maxym

georgeburbaFragment of country home

georgeburba

DelmasLehmanAn Amish carriage in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

DelmasLehman

WillardYoung barefoot Amish girl isolated on a background

Willard

urban_lightAmish Girl

urban_light

DelmasLehmanAmish Benefit Auction in Pennsylvania

DelmasLehman

ImageSupplyRoadside produce stall

ImageSupply

DelmasLehmanAmish Carriage

DelmasLehman

DelmasLehmanAmish Carriages in Rural Pennsylvania

DelmasLehman

georgeburbaFragment of country home

georgeburba

appalachianviewFarm fields along a country road in rural Lancaster County, Penn

appalachianview

AnetlandaYoung man retro style sitting on bench in park

Anetlanda

DelmasLehmanAmish Horse and Carriage

DelmasLehman

WollwerthAmish cart

Wollwerth

DelmasLehmanAn Amish Horse and Carriage Travels on a Rural Road

DelmasLehman

appalachianviewHome and barn on the farm fields and rolling hills of Southern Y

appalachianview

PrystaiBeautiful woman wearing authentic handmade sweeter and brown hat stay near chopped woods wall.

Prystai

ByelikovaAmish buggy in Lancaster County, PA. USA

Byelikova

Vadim_777Amish country, PA

Vadim_777

appalachianviewInterior of a covered bridge in rural Lancaster County, Pennsylv

appalachianview

fisknessAmish buggy and semi meet on highway.

fiskness

izanbarAmish while farming with horses at sunset

izanbar

WillardAmish buggy turns a corner in Lancaster County Pennsylvania

Willard

maxymAmish Country

maxym

kathyclarkClassic Amish Farm Wheat Stacks

kathyclark

maikampOld windmill

maikamp

juice_teamSale - colorful fabrics in the store, close up

juice_team

Wollwerth
Sours: https://depositphotos.com/stock-photos/amish.html

Amish Photography

Richard has a full-color gift book entitled, The Amish Quilt, which contains numerous Amish quilt designs and inspirational sayings. He also has a gift book called A Portrait of Amish Life, containing several of his photographs. In addition to the gift books, Richard has a perpetual calendar, The Simple Life, filled with sayings, Scriptures and quotes. It also includes numerous photos he’s taken in Amish country. Find out more about these items here.

Click on a photograph to see a larger version and to purchase prints or greeting cards. All photographs are available in the following sizes: 4×6 print matted to 5×7; 5×7 print matted to 8×10; and 8×10 print matted to 11×14. Greeting cards are 5×7 with a 4×6 photo on the front and blank inside. Greeting cards are available in a package of six. Shipping is $8 for the first item and $1 per item beyond that. If you prefer to pay by check or money order, click here to download a printable order form.

NOTE: Richard is only accepting USA orders at this time.

Washington State residents will be charged 8.2% tax during checkout.

Become a fan of Richard’s pictures on Facebook.

More pictures will be added soon.

Sours: https://wandabrunstetter.com/photos-and-videos/amish-photography/
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What do Amish think about photography?

Amish attitudes to picture-taking vary

amish no photosIt is commonly said that Amish don’t like having their photos taken.  “No photos please” signs are common in Amish communities.  Amish dislike zoo-exhibit treatment, and most avoid picture-seeking tourists and photojournalists seeking to capture their likenesses.   At the same time, there is a variety of thought on picture-taking among Amish.

Posed vs. unposed photos

Some Amish completely refuse to allow themselves to be photographed.  Posed photos in particularly may be seen as a show of pride.  On the other hand, some Amish make a distinction between having one’s photo taken in a natural setting, vs. posing for a photo.  Some have no problem with allowing themselves to be filmed or photographed, as long as it is obvious that they are not posing.

amish worker photo

Unposed photo of an Amish wood worker

This is how documentarians and photographers of the Amish often work.  Dirk Eitzen, in “The Amish and the Media”, explains the idea of “plausible deniability”—if an Amish person can plausibly deny that he was complicit, filming may be acceptable.  This often requires shooting from the side or at a distance but not directly.  Were an Amish person to be captured posing or speaking into a camera, then obviously he would not be able to deny willing participation.

Amish are typically wary of showing one’s face direct on camera.  When Amish do agree to interviews on camera, they are often done from the side or with face obscured.  The reluctance to show one’s face in a photo is also a reason that Amish identification is usually issued without a photograph.  This practice however has been problematic in recent years with new requirements mandating IDs with photos at United States border crossings.  As Amish sometimes travel to settlements in Canada, or to Mexico for cheaper medical treatment, this new mandate has been an obstacle for some.

Aggressive tourists

Despite the well-known reluctance of the Amish to be photographed, some visitors to Amish communities ignore etiquette and may aggressively pursue a photo.  Signage outside of Amish businesses in tourist areas may reflect frustration that comes from being treated as an attraction.  A particularly direct sign on an equestrian shop in the tourist center of Intercourse in Lancaster County unequivocally bans tourists from the premises.

Understandably, no one likes a camera pointed in their face, and in some settlements this behavior is worse than in others.  Eager tourists can sometimes behave recklessly in pursuit of a shot.  A car with a New York license plate was observed coming to a full stop in the middle of a busy county highway, in order to capture a shot of an oncoming buggy.  Such behavior is not uncommon, particularly in heavy Amish tourist areas such as Lancaster County.

Photos of Amish children

Amish often consider photos of their children different than photos of adults.  Opinions vary but many Amish allow photos of children.  One reason is that children are not yet baptized members of the church, and not necessarily bound by the stricture against posing for photos.  Numerous professional photographers have featured photos of Amish children.

amish children photo

Photos of children, or shots taken from the side, are often acceptable to Amish

Children are sometimes even used by the Amish themselves in business advertisements.  At the same time, other Amish do not allow photos of their children to be taken.

Photos of Amish businesses, farms, homes, buggies, etc.

Most Amish have little problem with photos taken of their land, dwellings, businesses, carriages, and so on.  Amish typically feature images of their businesses, products or farms and homes in advertisements for their products.  Calendars produced by Amish businesses, popular among Amish themselves, often feature such images as well.  At Amish America, we stick to shots of farm scenes, buggies, photos taken from a distance or ones that do not directly show the individual’s face.

Changing attitudes to photography?

While the stricture against posed photography generally holds, general attitudes towards photography may be changing, at least among a segment of the Amish population.  This may be due to increased Amish contact with the world, due to an occupational shift that has seen them opening businesses requiring greater contact with outsiders.  As Amish have come under the eye of the media, there have been examples of Amish appearing direct on camera for television shows and news pieces.

Attitudes to photography typically vary among individuals as well as between Amish affiliations.  Amish also acknowledge different approaches to taking photos.  On the whole, the Amish remain wary of picture-taking, but it’s probable that Amish attitudes to photography are softer today than they might have been 50 years ago.

For further information, see:

The Amish and the Media, eds. Diane Zimmerman Umble and David L. Weaver-Zercher, Chapter Two, “Reel Amish: The Amish in Documentaries”, Dirk Eitzen




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Question on the Amish? Get answers to 300+ questions in 41 categories at the Amish FAQ.


Sours: https://amishamerica.com/what-do-amish-think-about-photography/

Photography and the Amish

Gene-Wintersole-Amish-and-photos

Ohio’s Amish Country Magazine’s Facebook page and website get a lot of comments about photography and the Amish. Most non-Amish think it’s against their religion to be photographed. It’s actually NOT against an Amish person’s religion to be photographed. The Amish religion does, however, prohibit POSING for photographs.

Some Amish completely refuse to allow themselves to be photographed. Posed photos in particular may be seen as a show of pride. On the other hand, some Amish make a distinction between having one’s photo taken in a natural setting vs. posing for a photo. Some have no problem with allowing themselves to be filmed or photographed as long as it is obvious they are not posing.

If you ask an Amish person for permission to take their picture, most will politely say no, as this could be construed as a willingness to pose. Most Amish say they could care less if people take their picture, provided the photographers are respectful. Some Amish have recounted stories of tourists driving up their driveway and boldly walking onto their front lawn to take a photograph. One woman recalled a time when a tourist stopped her buggy and held the reins of the horse until his wife could get a photo! Stories like these aren't the norm, but keep in mind a few disrespectful photographers can generate a great deal of bad feeling within the Amish community.

Amish often consider photos of their children different than photos of adults. Opinions vary, but many Amish allow photos of children. One reason is that children are not yet baptized members of the church and not necessarily bound by the rules against posing for photos. Numerous professional photographers have featured photos of Amish Children.

Most Amish have little problem with photos taken of their land, dwellings, businesses, carriages, and so on. Amish typically feature images of their businesses, products or farms and homes in advertisements for their products.

While the rule against posed photography generally holds, general attitudes toward photography have been evolving, at least among certain segments of the Amish population. This may be due to increased Amish contact with the world, due to an occupational shift that has seen them opening businesses requiring greater contact with outsiders.

Attitudes to photography typically vary among individuals as well as between the different Amish orders. Amish also acknowledge different approaches to taking photos. On the whole, the Amish remain wary of picture-taking, but it’s probable that Amish attitudes to photography are softer today than they might have been 10 years ago.

Here in Ohio’s Amish Country, being a high tourist area, the photography rules are a little less strict. That doesn’t mean a photographer or tourist can be disrespectful. No means no, a turn of a head means don’t photograph my face and by all means do not trespass on private property.

Sours: https://ohiosamishcountry.com/articles/photography-and-the-amish

Photos amish

Down, he liked to watch the expression on his mother's face when he manipulated her nipples. Having played enough, he untied the belt of his mother's robe and opened it abruptly. Lydia was somewhat shy of her fullness and protruding belly, but Andrei, on the contrary, liked her magnificent figure.

I ask her, when I go to the boss's office, she often comes to his work, as she says at home it's boring to look at people. Our team is young. It just so happened that this direction was new, the elderly or aged could not delve into the topic of what to do here.

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I never had a problem with her. I tried to do everything on time. Many people asked me to help. I did not refuse most of them, if I had the time and opportunity, I always helped classmates and also students of my stream.



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