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Black Book Vs Kelly Blue Book

Black Book Vs Kelly Blue Book Trade In Values

Is there a difference between Black Book Vs Kelley Blue Book trade in values? Are you looking to sell your vehicle or trade it in?

Keep reading to find out all about the 2 main sources for USED Car, Truck and other Vehicle pricing.

  • Kelley Blue Book
  • Black Book and more!!!

CAR DEALERS love to quote Blue Book this and Blue Book that, but what does it really mean?

You might hear things like

  • Blue Book Pricing
  • We sell below Blue Book
  • Get Blue Book value for your trade-in

BLACK BOOK vs KELLY BLUE BOOK TRADE IN VALUES

BLACK BOOK – OVERVIEW

Black Book is what dealers usually refer to when trying to figure out how much a used vehicle or trade in is worth. Black Book originally began in 1955 literally as a black book containing weekly car values for every vehicle and every region in the country. Today Black Book (https://www.blackbook.com) is available via the web or mobile through a paid subscription.

Black Book offers various paid subscription options. The main subscription that Dealers use includes trade in values and information on cars and light trucks. These vehicle appraisals help dealers calculate vehicle leases and used car and truck prices.

  • Four wholesale values based on condition: Extra Clean, Clean, Average and Rough
  • History Adjusted Valuations – a more precise way to appraise vehicles. Instantly understand the impact of a vehicle’s history report on its value.
  • Four retail values based on condition: Extra Clean, Clean, Average and Rough
  • Three trade-in values based on condition: Clean, Average and Rough
  • Finance Advance™ value
  • Value adjustments for mileage and optional equipment
  • Value adjustments for region or state
  • Access auction sales data from over 162 auctions with our Complete Market Report (separate subscription required)
  • Over 32,000 used vehicle values for model years 1981- current.
  • Pull up to 1,000 valuations per month.

Black book offers subscriptions in both print and online and also via a mobile application. Mobile subscriptions start around $65 a month or over $700 annually.

If you want to know what the dealers know when buying a used car, the Black Book mobile application is a great tool to use. Because they offer monthly memberships, it will not cost a ton to be really informed.


KELLEY BLUE BOOK – OVERVIEW

While Black Book is mostly used by dealers, Kelley Blue Book (Not spelled Kelly Blue Book without the “e”) is mostly used by individuals looking to trade in or sell their vehicles. Since 1926, Kelley Blue Book has been one of the best-known names in the auto industry. Today, https://KBB.com or https://kelleybluebook.com extends the tradition, with trusted values and a reputation for innovation, including resources to help you research, price and shop for the car you’ve been looking for.

One advantage of using Kelly Blue Book is the service is free without monthly subscriptions.

Kelly Blue Book rates its used car evaluations as

Kelley Blue Book breaks it’s pricing guides into 2 main categories which include the KBB New Car Guide and KBB Used Car Guide.

BUYING NEW

If you are in the market for a new vehicle, the KBB New Car Guide contains pricing information for the current model year including

  • MSRP (Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price)
  • Dealer Costs
  • Extra Costs – includes other various costs (Example shipping costs)
  • Pricing Schedules – includes pricing for various options that buyers can select

BUYING USED

If you are in the market for a used vehicle, the KBB Used Car Guide contains pricing information for used vehicles made in the last 15 years. The Used Car Guide offers several different prices:

  • Retail Price – also known as the dealer price or what you could expect to pay at a dealer.
  • Trade-In Price – also known as the dealer trade-in value
  • Private Sale Price – Is the price for selling by owner. The Private Sale Price is almost always lower than the Trade-In Price and is a good estimate of what to expect to pay for or sell a used vehicle from a non-dealer.

The Used Car Guild includes various charts and tables for calculating price based on

  • Vehicle Condition
  • Car Mileage
  • Vehicle Options

If you are looking to buy or sell an older vehicle, motorcycle or RV, that information is published separately and may only be available in guidebooks and not via the KBB website.

Historically Kelley Blue Book gathered vehicle cost data information through vehicle auctions, which often can inflate the price compared to how Black Book calculates their trade in and used vehicle prices.


NATIONAL APPRAISAL GUIDES

Beyond both Black Book and Kelly Blue Book, another useful tool for figuring out vehicle price is NADA (http://www.nadaguides.com). National Appraisal Guides, Inc. is the largest publisher of vehicle pricing, information and tools for new and used cars.

BLUE BOOK VS BLACK BOOK | BEST ADVISE

As a rule of thumb Kelley Blue Book values are a pretty good indicator to use when buying vehicle from an individual or when selling a vehicle to an individual. The Blue Book values tend to be a little on the high side when buying used vehicles from a dealership or when trading in a vehicle.

Best advice is to do your homework and don’t go into a buying or selling situation blind.

If you happen to be in the Wyoming or Nebraska neighborhood, check out out Fremont Motors for loads of new and used cars, truck and SUVs.

KELLEY BLUE BOOK Vs BLACK BOOK | FAQ

What Are Black Book Car Values?

Black Book Vehicle Pricing. The Black Book is what dealerships typically use to lookup pricing information about new, used car, truck, and recreational vehicle prices. Black Book updates the Dealer invoice and Manufacturers Suggested Retail Prices (MSRP) weekly. Dealers also use the Black Book loan values for finance purposes.

Black Book publishes weekly publications in print and online is still going strong today.

What Is The Difference Between Black Book and Kelley Blue Book?

As stated above, the Black Book is what dealers usually refer to when trying to figure out how much a used vehicle or trade in is worth. Consumers will typically use Kelley Blue Book values when estimating new and use vehicle costs.

Is Edmunds Or KBB More Accurate?

In realistic terms both Kelley Blue Book (KBB) and Edmunds give an approximation of vehicle value based on various sources. Both the Kelley Blue Book and Black Book are generally used when buying a car from a dealership.

What Is The Value Of My Car In Kelley Blue Book?

The Kelley Blue Book is a good estimation of what a car might sell for and how much it is worth. The price doesn’t include warranties and other options that may increase the a cars value. Ultimately the KBB value is often used as a starting point for negotiation and not the final price.

What Does The Black Book Value Mean?

You can think of the Black Book values as an estimated wholesale value of a vehicle that dealers use to ensure profits when buying or selling used cars. From a consumer standpoint, a dealer will always look to make a profit, so you can expect to pay over the Black Book value when buying used and under the Black Book value when trading in or selling your vehicle to a dealer.

Sours: https://www.fremontmotors.com/black-book-vs-kelly-blue-book-trade-in-values.html

Kelley Blue Book Car Values - a Trusted Resource?

How Accurate are Kelley Blue Book® Car Values When Selling Your Car?

Car sellers often turn to Kelley Blue Book® to find out how much is my car worth. Kelley Blue Book or KBB is a respected used car price guide often quoted by used car dealers to demonstrate that prices of cars on their lots are fair. When it comes to realizing the Blue Book price when selling a used car outright, sellers often find their expectations are set too high.

When trading in your car for a new car, you'll usually be offered an attractive price for your car. Dealers use questioning techniques to find out whether you're more interested in a great trade-in price or are looking for a big discount on a new car and will tailor the deal to give you the perception of value. The most important factor for you as a buyer, however, is the cost to change. Attractive trade-in prices are usually subsidized by reducing the discount on your new car. The dealer is looking at the overall profit on the deal.

If you want to sell your car privately or get a bigger discount on your next car by avoiding the dealer's trade-in math, the Blue Book trade-in price may not be the best benchmark for you. Kelley Blue Books's trade-in price assumes you're buying another car and the dealer has some profit to play with. Selling privately, you're unlikely to get the Kelley Blue Book trade in price, but that doesn't mean you're getting a bad deal, simply a fair market price. A dealer paying Blue Book for a trade-in is either going to retail the car (more profit) or push it back through the auto auctions, often at a loss. How can a dealer pay Blue Book and afford to sell your trade-in at a loss? The answer's simple, the trade-in math favors the dealer.

For a fair value for your car, try the fast, safe and fair way to sell your car today at webuyanycar.com®. Need convincing that the KBB value may not be as accurate as you think? Check out KBB Instant Cash Offer. This is where KBB gives you a better idea of your car's true value which may be much lower if you're not trading in against a shiny new car with a very high profit margin. Remember, KBB makes money from selling leads (your personal information) to dealers.

Sours: https://www.webuyanycarusa.com/landing/content/5/kelley-blue-book-trade-in-prices
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Are Kelley Blue Book Values Accurate and Reliable?

When buying or selling a used car, many people rely on the Kelley Blue Book (KBB), which has been around since 1926. One sign of its popularity: Roughly 20 million unique visitors per month log on to the Kelley Blue Book website.

Although automotive experts acknowledge that the Kelley Blue Book is one of the most popular and trusted guides in automotive pricing, the question remains: Is it accurate and reliable? Here’s a look at how Kelley determines car pricing, an assessment of some issues consumers might encounter with KBB pricing, and a brief review of some of the top competitors in the industry.

Key Takeaways

  • The Kelley Blue Book—and its equally popular website—is one of the most trusted guides for automobile pricing, used by those who are buying or selling cars.
  • Kelley assesses the following values: private party value, trade-in value, suggested retail value, and certified pre-owned (CPO) value.
  • Kelley determines Blue Book values by analyzing pricing information from real-world used car prices, as well as industry developments, economic conditions, and location.
  • Potential problems with Blue Book values include a delay as price information is assessed, the consumer tendency to overrate the value of the car they are selling or trading in, and a mismatch between wholesale values listed by Kelley and the prices used by dealers, who access special industry-only pricing info.

How Kelley Blue Book Determines Car Values

Kelley Blue Book receives real-world used car prices on a daily basis from wholesale auctions, independent and franchised dealers, rental fleets, auto manufacturers, lessors, and private party transactions.

Kelley’s proprietary algorithm analyzes pricing data along with historical trends, current economic conditions, industry developments, time of year, and location to determine Kelley Blue Book values.

That process results in the following values for used cars:

  • Private-party value refers to how much you will have to pay for a specific used car from a private seller.
  • Trade-in value is the amount you are likely to get from a dealer for a trade-in.
  • Suggested retail value refers to what dealers are typically asking for a specific used car.
  • Certified pre-owned (CPO) value tells us how much cars covered by the CPO program are worth. 

Some Issues With KBB Pricing

Some factors that could affect the accuracy of KBB values are lag time, consumer bias, and mismatched data.

Lag Time

It takes time for data and analysis to make its way through KBB. Prices listed may not always reflect the very latest trends and economic conditions.

Consumer Bias

Most people think the car they are selling or trading in is in better condition than it really is. If you misjudge the condition of a car for trade-in or purchase, your expectations may not match the reality of KBB’s valuation structure.

Mismatched Data 

Most dealers do not use KBB for trade-in (wholesale) values. Instead, many rely on National Auto Research’s Black Book or the Manheim Market Report, neither of which is available to the public. More important, both tend to skew lower than KBB in wholesale pricing.

1926

The year Les Kelley, a Los Angeles car dealer, published the first Kelley Blue Book.

Solutions for Consumers

If you use KBB as a general guide and follow the suggestions below, Kelley Blue Book data can be very useful.

Print out Definitions

If negotiating to buy a used car from a private seller, show KBB’s car condition definitions to the seller, especially if you believe the car is priced too high. 

Negotiate 

KBB’s pricing structure tends to favor dealers, meaning listed retail prices can be higher than other guides. Start with the listed retail price and bargain down. 

Ask for Sources 

Be aware that insider guides like Manheim or Black Book tend to show lower wholesale prices than KBB. Ask about the source of the trade-in offer or wholesale price.

Consult Other Guides 

Consult one or more other websites or pricing guides to get an “average” for the vehicle you are trading in, selling, or planning to buy.

Since the three main consumer guides—KBB, Edmunds.com, and NADA—use different algorithms, your best bet is to check all three and calculate an average price.

Additional Resources

The following are several sources you can check for pricing and rating information before buying, trading in, or selling a used car.

Edmunds:This website offers an appraisal engine that includes five car condition categories compared with KBB’s four. This can be helpful—or generate confusion—depending on how realistic you are about your car’s condition. Many experts believe Edmunds' values are more accurate than KBB's. That’s not always the case, of course, which is why getting several estimates and averaging still makes the most sense.

NADA Guides: One of the oldest guides, NADA guides were designed for dealer members of the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) trade group. NADA pricing is often higher than Kelley Blue Book since the algorithm has a standard that calls for all trade-ins to be in very clean condition. As a result, you may need to adjust NADA prices down. 

J.D. Power: Although the ratings are only for new cars, the used car search provides dealer pricing based on ZIP code. This information could be valuable if you are planning to sell a car outright and want to know what typical pricing in your area looks like.

Consumer Reports: The well-respected, noncommercial (no advertising accepted) publication offers lots of information if you buy an online subscription, less if you don’t. The website features general pricing on used cars, information on reliability, cars to avoid, and much more.

The Bottom Line

Kelley Blue Book is a very good resource, but it should not be the only one you consult. Although none of the top used car buying guides is perfect, when taken together—along with additional information gained from other websites and tools, such as auto loan calculators—they can provide reasonably reliable and accurate information for your used car transaction.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/personal-finance/113015/are-kelley-blue-book-values-accurate-and-reliable.asp

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